I need help with 2 very fidgety students!

Discussion in 'Behavior Management' started by andi137, Jul 30, 2008.

  1. andi137

    andi137 Companion

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    Jul 30, 2008

    A little background I teach Primary Special education at a very small school. I only have 4 children on my caseload right now. I have two first graders who are with me full time. They are driving me crazy. They are very sweet tempered but we cannot stay on task on anything we are trying to do. If I have them sit on the carpet they are rolling around or sitting close to each other and laughing. I have them pull a card but I dont think they even comprehend that pulling a card is a bad thing. Today they missed out on 15 minutes of free choice time, but I am not sure they understood that they were being punished. It is only day 3 and I am already ready to pull my hair out. I try to talk to other teachers, but they are like oh your two kids are so sweet. They are sweet, but we just cant get through a single activity without them somehow interrupting or just completely going off-task. Any help or suggestions would be greatly appreciated.
     
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  3. Ghost

    Ghost Habitué

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    Jul 30, 2008

    Sounds like ADD or sensory disorders. I would try giving them some sort of physical activity to do before attempting a sit-down activity. I like to have the kids use scooter boards or jump on a mini-trampoline first. Another activity that I've used is having them pull me around the room in my chair. You could try sending one on an errand to the office....carrying a stack of heavy books. But let the office know it's a therapy thing and they can have something heavy for the child to carry back to the room. Um, chair dips, wall push-ups, even the old standby of donkey kicks and wheelbarrow or crab walk would help a little. If it is ADD or SI, then they probably can't control it. Make your consequences logical--if you don't sit still at circle, then you will walk/run a lap for each time I have to stop teaching.
     
  4. aautismj

    aautismj Rookie

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    Aug 14, 2008

    I agree with Trinda to do some pre-sit down exercise. Another suggestion that works with my students is giving positive reinforcement rather than giving consequences. My students don't understand consequences but they do understand that if they get 5 pennies for sitting nicely then they get to play with their favorite toy. Maybe start a system with pennies, or stickers, or something and every time you catch them "being good" give them a penny. When they get 5 pennies (or whatever number you designate) then they get a reward. It may be a little more work in the beginning because you may have to break every 5 minutes or so for a reward break but it may be worth it in the long term.
     
  5. rchlkay

    rchlkay Companion

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    Aug 14, 2008

    I definitely recommend something sensory for the kids to use. The chair cushions are good and I also have kids that sit on a chair ball. I've put velcro on the underside of a desk so the kids have something to rub on. Squishy balls, stress balls, or dough (can't think of a better word...I like silly putty) of some sort is great for kids to use while they work but you have to teach them how to use it. It can't just be a toy. Kids with disabilities as young as you have may not understand consequences for behavior. Try to reinforce the good behavior and give them breaks every ten minutes or so.
     
  6. Goldie

    Goldie Companion

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    Aug 14, 2008

    Great ideas! Reinforce the good behavior. Change activities frequently especially at the beginning of the year. Go from an active activity to a sit down to an active. Incorporate music...simple songs with movement. These strategies helped in my K-1 Comm. Disorders class.
     
  7. Samothrace

    Samothrace Cohort

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    Aug 22, 2008

    If you don't think they are understanding the pulling a card, the one mh class I taught in (as the art teacher on a cart) used smileys and frowns, which they might understand better. I think if they accumulated x number of frowns there was some other kind of consequence.

    I've also heard of people taking noodles for the swimming pool and cutting them in half for students with add or adhd to put under their feet and roll back and forth to expel the energy too.
     
  8. andi137

    andi137 Companion

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    Aug 22, 2008

    Thanks for all the great ideas. They are slowly getting better!
     
  9. steakroom

    steakroom Rookie

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    Aug 23, 2008

    help!

    I know that there are some subjects where there is no exciting way to present it. In that case-try using a ball instead of having them just raise their hand (of course-you have to set ground rules first). But I have found if it is a crazy looking squishy ball, the kids seem so pay more attention b/c they want a chance to catch and pass it.
     

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