I Need Help <3

Discussion in 'General Education' started by BrighterFutureAhead, May 25, 2020.

  1. BrighterFutureAhead

    BrighterFutureAhead Rookie

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    May 25, 2020

    There is a short summary at the bottom for those who are in a rush.

    Hey everyone! :)

    I want to be very honest and transparent when I write this.

    I want to thank all of you on this forum ahead of time for taking a moment out of their busy lives to read my post. I could use all the help and advice out there. I hope everyone is staying safe and healthy during these crazy times!

    I am in my mid twenties. I am currently living in south Florida (been here on and off for about two years now) but will be moving to New York about half an hour from the city in about a month or two once things calm down a bit more. Until I was laid off due to COVID19 I was a "permanent" substitute and a "permanent" aftercare tutor/counselor at a small local charter school. I was also tutoring and working with students on the side in addition to making a little bit of money online. I have worked from all grades anywhere from kindergarten to sixth grade. I love teaching very much.

    Due to uncertainty of when I would have been moving back to New York or possibly the D.C. Metro area I (foolishly) never became a full certified educator. I did take the Florida general knowledge teaching exam (the four sections) and passed it all the first time around though. But, that was the only test I ever took. I hold a two year degree in psychology and a four year degree in both psychology and criminal justice. Now though, I have confirmed that I will be able to move to New York sometime in the middle or late summer.

    I feel like my back is against the wall though. I currently don't have a job nor do I have one lined up in New York. I will be living with family. I will still be spending my own money from what I have saved up over the years to cover my own expenses. I want to understand the fastest way possible I could become a teacher in New York and I have been looking at perhaps teaching special education. I know it's not easy but I do believe in God (not going down a tangent I pinky promise) and I do in my heart feel like it is both rewarding and a blessing to teach those who have been born different.

    Unfortunately I feel very overwhelmed from what I am reading online. Could anyone give me guidance or advice on what direction I should be heading? I will be living in Yonkers New York. I don't want to come across like I am trying to jump to a high salary off the bat but it would be very good if I can land something at least $60k+ starting with room to grow.

    Please and thank you all! Much love! <3

    Summary:
    I am in my mid twenties. I have a two year degree in psychology and a four year degree in both psychology and criminal justice. I have about two years of work experience subbing, after care counseling, and tutoring kids ages k-6 at a small local charter school in south Florida. I am going to be moving to Yonkers New York sometime in the summer to live with family. I want to become a special education teacher but I am not sure where to begin. My goal is to either get a degree or do a program or take a certification exam(s) and have it all completed in two years or less to obtain a starting salary of at least $60k+ with potential and room to grow.
     
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  3. Tired Teacher

    Tired Teacher Groupie

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    It sounds like it is truly a calling for you. I don't know the answer, but will pray in agreement with you that God will show you the way. <3
     
  4. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    May 26, 2020

    Welcome to A to Z Forums, BrighterFutureAhead. Your three threads have been merged into one, in accordance with the A to Z site owner's position that allowing multiple threads on the same topic at the same time tends to dilute the discussion. (Yes, I'm a moderator. No, you're not in trouble. I'm just taking advantage of an opportunity to repeat the policy and to let you know a trick that A to Z Forums veterans use: we don't check for new threads by going forum by forum, but instead we use one of the Recent Posts links at the top of the page to bring up a list of all the threads that someone has either launched or posted in since the last time we checked.)

    Breathe, please, and best of luck going forward.
     
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  5. swansong1

    swansong1 Virtuoso

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    May 26, 2020

    I think your best bet is to contact the NY DOE and have a discussion with them about certification requirements. That will point you in a starting direction. Good luck.
     
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  6. TeacherNY

    TeacherNY Phenom

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    You need to have the NY DOE evaluate your transcripts and determine what you are deficient in. They will actually send you a detailed list of what you need to do to become certified. It's often difficult to reach them by phone but if you email them they can direct you pretty easily (from my experience). You might have to create an account on their website
    http://www.highered.nysed.gov/tcert/teach/.
     
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  7. BrighterFutureAhead

    BrighterFutureAhead Rookie

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    Hey everyone! :)

    Wow! I am so amazed to see so many people replying to my post! It really means a lot! :)

    1 - @ TeacherGroupie - Sorry about making three threads at once. Thank you for not banning/muting me for that. It wont happen again. :)

    2 - @ Tired Teacher - I appreciate you praying for me! I've definitely been doing a fair bit of that on my own end haha.

    3 - @ swansong1 - Thank you! I am on their web page and doing some reading right now.

    4 - @ TeacherNY - Thank you SO much for that link! I will create an account and email them right now. I have a silly question but I have been navigating through that website and I came across a section talking about people who already have a four year degree but it is not in teaching. I am looking at your username and I'm assuming you do teach in The Empire State. What do you specifically teach? How did you go down that path?
     
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  8. BrighterFutureAhead

    BrighterFutureAhead Rookie

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    I am unable to post links it seems.

    What should I complete on this website to be allowed to do that? I have a question about some reading material I came across from that specific website.

    Thanks all! <3
     
  9. TeacherNY

    TeacherNY Phenom

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    What is your degree in and what do you want to teach? It might just be a matter of taking certain education classes and then tests if your degree is in the field you want to teach.
     
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  10. BrighterFutureAhead

    BrighterFutureAhead Rookie

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    Thank you for the prompt response! :)

    Education:
    Associates of Science in Psychology (2 year degree)
    Bachelors of Arts in Psychology & Criminal Justice (4 year double major)

    Relevant Experience:
    Two years working at a local public charter school K-6 as a permanent substitute and aftercare counselor plus some tutoring on the side.

    I want to teach either elementary school (anything K-6 but I prefer 2nd or 3rd grade the most but I am not picky) or special education. I have worked with students from very diverse backgrounds. I have worked with individuals with ADHD and Autism but have never worked with anyone with more severe conditions but am willing to learn.

    *** EDIT ***

    I don't see myself teaching psychology or criminal justice. I would prefer to teach elementary aged students. I have worked with students from age five to age thirteen. I am open to working with special education (in the earlier grades such as K-6) because I know it is in huge demand and we are in need of teachers with compassion.
     
  11. vickilyn

    vickilyn Multitudinous

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    May 26, 2020

    Yeah - that is a factor of number of posts and how long you have been a member. Sorry to say that you may not be able to post links for quite a while and there is "nothing you can sign" to change that. Don't take it personally - it prevents spammers.

    Speaking of your education and desires: Your associates degree is trumped by your BA or BS, which ever you earned, since those credits were almost certainly counted towards your degree.

    SPED will be a wonderful addition, but will entail graduate school. I am in NJ, right next door, and the Teacher of Students with Disabilities requires a minimum of 21-28 credits, depending on the university you attend. I freely admit that I don't know about the NY requirements, but believe that a similar amount of classes will be required. The good news is that this is an endorsement that you can normally get as a provisional certificate (in NJ), but I don't know if you can get that while on a provisional teaching certificate for your primary certification, in this case, Elementary Education. I do, however, fully support the prior information given above about contacting NYDOE and getting all of this information right "from the horse's mouth", so to speak. Best of luck - at the very least, you may be able to get your substitute certificate, which will allow you to earn money while doing everything that may be necessary to earn your permanent teaching certificate.
     
    Last edited: May 26, 2020
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  12. BrighterFutureAhead

    BrighterFutureAhead Rookie

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    No worries at all! Makes perfect sense. I just wanted to post some links because I wasn't sure if I was on the right page for something but that's totally fine.

    Thank you for clarifying. :)
     
  13. RainStorm

    RainStorm Phenom

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    Glad you are with us.

    First of all, experience as a sub or as an afterschool person (while great) doesn't count for anything in getting your teaching certification, so just be aware of it. It can help though, later, by giving you some background when answering interview scenario questions, so in that way, it is good.

    You are most likely going to need to sign up for a "career switcher" teacher certification program. It is the fastest and cheapest way to become an elementary school teacher. These are also called alternative teacher preparation (ATP) pathways for educator certification for second career professionals.

    http://teachnyc.net/getting-started/alternative-routes-to-certification Lists all the available ways in New York to obtain an alternative certification. You need to realize that some of these are fast, but you are still talking at least a year full-time to do this. There is no quick alternative route to teaching elementary school.

    Also, I'd like to suggest one thing. Before you invest the money (and these programs do cost money) and so much of your time, make sure the area were you are moving in New York actually has jobs, and that they actually hire teachers who went through the alternative certification program. If they have a teacher's shortage, then they will be more likely to hire career switches. However, if teaching positions are few and far between in the area where you are going to live, then you may find that the have a huge preference to traditionally trained elementary teachers who had full student teaching experiences. I'm not saying this to discourage you, only to forewarn you. In places like here in Florida, they have a huge teacher shortage, and it is easy to get hired with an alternative certification. I've worked in other parts of the country where the HR departments wouldn't even consider interviewing an alternative certification person, because they were getting 500 applicants for each open position. Make sure you thoroughly understand the job market in your new area, and DON"T believe the people recruiting for the alternative certification program, because they will tell you what they think you want to hear, so they can make money of you! (Traditional brick and mortar colleges do the same thing.)

    A lot of people who want to become teachers don't realize that, at the elementary education level, there is no way to quickly do this, and you can't do it just by passing a test and having a college degree. You have to have college coursework in pedagogy, and all of the subjects, from an accredited program. The state will have specific course you have to have, and you will have had NONE of them in a psychology or criminal justice program.

    When I made teaching my second career, it was before they had career switcher programs. The only choice back then was to go back to college full-time for a year (and I already had a Master's in Education, they wouldn't those courses because they weren't specific to elementary education.) The people without the degree in education (with just another type of 4 year degree) had to go back for 2 years, full-time. I just want you to go into this with your eyes open.

    Best wishes!
     
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  14. RainStorm

    RainStorm Phenom

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    Just out of curiosity, I looked up the job outlook for teachers in New York state.
    These are the state’s 2019-20 shortage areas:

    • Art and Music Education
    • Library Media Specialist Staff
    • Blind/Visually Impaired
    • Literacy
    • Career and Technical Education, grades 7-12
    • Mathematics, grades 7-12
    • Deaf/Hard of Hearing
    • Science, grades 7-12
    • English as a Second Language (ESL)
    • Social Studies, grades 7-12
    • ESL with Bilingual Extension
    • Special Education with Bilingual Extension
    • English Language Arts, grades 7-12
    • Students With Disabilities, all grades
    • Health and Physical Fitness
    • World Languages
    • Language and Speech


    You'll notice that none of the areas needed are elementary school. It looks like that field is fairly saturated right now in New York state, though that may vary by specific areas.

    The do have shortages in special education for all grade levels. You may want to go that route if you have an interest in this area. It is a tough, high burnout job, though, so just be prepared for that. You will still have to do the career switcher route to get certified, but you may have more job opportunities.
     
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  15. vickilyn

    vickilyn Multitudinous

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    I've never heard it described better, RainStorm! Yes, I do teach SPED, and the words were dead on target.
     
  16. RainStorm

    RainStorm Phenom

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    Vickilyn,

    I always worry when I hear young education majors say "oh I'll get an endorsement in Special Ed and it will make me more marketable." Special Ed isn't something you just "do" to help you get a job. It is a calling.

    There is a special placed in heaven for Special Educators!
     
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  17. BrighterFutureAhead

    BrighterFutureAhead Rookie

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    WOW!

    I am completely blown away how much support and feedback all of you are providing me right now. It really (really) means a lot. I'm trying to put into works how thankful I am for all of your words of guidance and information. I also really appreciate everyone being up front and honest about not just the good stuff but also some more "negative" or "harsher truths" so to speak.

    I apologize for my delayed response. I was reading through what everyone wrote and was actually taking a few notes haha. I am such a nerd. This is really good stuff.

    Okay I'll put down some bullet points so that I can be very transparent. I am on the web page right now, but, I am currently a resident of Florida and want to keep my residency for as long as I can before I have officially moved into New York.

    Bullet Points

    1 - I am living in south Florida right now. I will be moving to Yonkers New York sometime in summer 2020 to live with family. It seems that for me to email teachnyc & nysed I have to create a NY residency account/profile but I am a Florida resident not a New York resident. Will there be a downside to this?

    2 - I don't mind going "back to school" whether for my masters or to get a certification or license. I have enough money saved that I can focus on school full time for about two years since I'll be living at home and making my own meals. If push comes to shove I can get a part time job somewhere but I want to complete all education in two years or less.

    3 - What is the difference between "students with disabilities" and "special education"? I apologize if this sounds foolish. Also, for ESL, I am a native English speaker but I know a bit of Russian and a tiny amount of Spanish. For math I have taught math up to grade six but I don't mind cramming to study for a higher level.

    4 - Rainstorm looks like you also reside in the sunny state so correct me if I am wrong please. I know from my experience in Florida that if you already have a bachelors in anything all you have to do is take three different state exams (general knowledge, teaching terminology, and a specific subject you wish to teach) and then boom! You can teach. Would there be a similar path I can do in New York if I want to teach, for example, middle school math? (I took the general knowledge exam and passed all four sections the first time around!)

    5 - My goal is to do whatever I have to do so that I can get a teaching job comes Fall (August 2022) in an environment where I have job security, benefits, and potential to grow. I would say I have to do more research on my end but it looks like I am leaning towards either SPED, ESL, or Math.
     
  18. BrighterFutureAhead

    BrighterFutureAhead Rookie

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    I couldn't agree more with your last sentence! I definitely can imagine how common burnout is when teaching SPED but I also was drawn to the idea because I do believe it is God's work.
     
  19. BrighterFutureAhead

    BrighterFutureAhead Rookie

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    @vickilyn

    I don't know much about NY vs NJ but is there a downside to getting a cert/degree in NY if I end up teaching in NJ?

    I am unsure if I can just take some exams and courses (online whether through a FL or NY school) and then begin teaching to get my full license. There seems to be extra steps in NY than FL from what I am reading online.
     
  20. RainStorm

    RainStorm Phenom

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    Brighter,
    It sounds like you have a reasonable time-table in mind.

    I think you might want to open another thread on this forum, asking career switchers which program they used to get licenses, and do they recommend it. You will get a lot of valuable information about what online programs are out there. Of course, then you want to look into the best ones, and you want to ask them specific questions, such as how much in-the-classroom time you will be spending, what kind of practicum they were require, do they offer direct student teaching and if so, what is the duration, and most importantly, do they help you set this up. (Some programs you are on your own, but the good ones help you arrange these things, and they have a network set up.) Of course the cost is important too.

    And of course, the most important piece of information you'll need -- is their program accepted by the NY DOE? (Don't take vague answers like "it's accepted almost everywhere," because I'm telling you, these places will tell you whatever they think you need to hear to pay them the money! ) Listen carefully to what they say, and ask where you can find that information IN WRITING! (and print it out for your records.)

    Best wishes!
     
  21. BrighterFutureAhead

    BrighterFutureAhead Rookie

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    I'm really lost for words and grateful for all of your help and information!

    (Along with everyone else pitching in here and helping me out. This has been so helpful you can't even imagine. It's a bit scary for me to be diving into this alone but this forum is providing a ton of support)

    I don't want to get into trouble with making posts in the wrong sections but where is the "career switchers" section? I can't seem to find it.

    Also, yes I agree, there are many "predatory" schools out there that seem to want to say anything they can to get money from people. I admit I am very cautious. I have worked my butt off for many years and I joke around how I spent far too much time and money on my two year degree and four year degree just not never be able to use them. I fell for the trap. Now I am in my mid twenties and will not allow myself to fall for another trick like that ever again. I will definitely do my research and find the correct school and program.

    From what I am understanding I have to work on my certification/license for about one to two years while getting my "practicum" hours then take a State exam? So in about two or three years I will be an actual "real" teacher with full pay and benefits? New York seems a bit more confusing than Florida, at least for me that's how it comes across haha.
     
  22. RainStorm

    RainStorm Phenom

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    You can post it in Elementary Education or in General Education. Either one will do the trick.

    I would imagine you could do a career switcher program with the practicum in 2 years, realistically. But the best people to check with are people who've gone through that type of program.
     
  23. BrighterFutureAhead

    BrighterFutureAhead Rookie

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    I thought this post was already in General Education but I will post in Secondary since I want to teach middle school math. :)

    Thank you again so much! Hopefully I can get just a bit more info but this has already been very helpful. :)
     
  24. TeacherNY

    TeacherNY Phenom

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    If you want to teach mathematics you will have to enroll in a program that will get you a BS in Applied Mathematics or Mathematics Education (which they had in my college). You can also get a MS in Mathematics and then get your teaching certification. Either way, I'm not sure your exact time frame of 2-3 years is doable.
    I have also had luck in getting some answers about certification from the SUNY certification departments (STATE UNIVERSITY OF NY) and there are several of those schools you could contact.
     
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  25. BrighterFutureAhead

    BrighterFutureAhead Rookie

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    Thank you! :)

    So there is no way to become an educator in two or three years? More likely a four year period? I'm not sure if I'm able to take that long. I will check out SUNY Certification Departments.

    Do you know any specific programs that can be done in two or three years? I was on the (I cant link it) site posted earlier in this thread and it was going over some programs that take seven weeks (NYC Teaching Follows) and then place you in a title-one school? I need to do more reading but I am looking for any route that can get me into education (middle school or high school - somewhere with block schedules) where there is a starting salary of at least $60k a year and with benefits. I am leaning towards math or possibly science. I am looking at special education routes as well but it seems that those are not on block schedules.
     
  26. TeacherNY

    TeacherNY Phenom

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    If you definitely want to teach in NYC then check that out but I can't see how much math you will learn in 7 weeks. Do you think you could pass the tests without taking actual classes???
     
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  27. BrighterFutureAhead

    BrighterFutureAhead Rookie

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    I apologize if I came across as dismissive of how difficult this path would be to complete. I am just overwhelmed by what I am reading since it seems I either have to go back to school for two or three years for a masters degree IN ADDITION to working for a year or two for practicum hours before obtaining even just a temporary license/certification.

    I feel like my back is against the wall because I'm just trying to figure out what I can do, whether it is teaching math or science or ESL or special education, and I am trying to figure out the fastest route (not cheapest or easiest) to being a full fledged educator by August (Fall) of 2023 at the latest.
     
  28. TeacherNY

    TeacherNY Phenom

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    Did you take any math classes at the college level? I'm only asking because I personally math wasn't my best subject and I can't imagine how difficult masters level math classes could be. If you think you are proficient enough in math to take masters level courses and then pass the required tests then I guess it's possible to be done in 2-3 years but you also have to take into account the education classes and, depending on which school you choose, the availability of each class each semester (I was only able to take certain education classes in the spring because that's ONLY when they were offered, etc). I wouldn't put a time limit on your studies until you speak with someone at the specific school you want to attend.
     
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  29. bella84

    bella84 Aficionado

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    I did a two year career changer masters program, complete with practicum hours and student teaching. It resulted in me being certified for elementary education and special education K-12. Becoming secondary certified for a general education content area courses would have taken me longer because my bachelors degree was not in a specific content area taught in K-12 schools. I’m unfamiliar with NY, but, based on my experiences, I would guess that the only way you’ll be able to do it as fast as you want is if you already have a bachelors degree in math or science, OR if you are willing to teach elementary (or maybe special education or ESL, depending on NY’s certification requirements). If you really want to teach secondary math or science, and you don’t already have a bachelors degree in those areas, then prepare for longer than a two year program.

    I did my program at a brick and mortar non-profit school that was clearly accepted by my state’s dept of ed. I would suggest that you do the same. I knew someone who went the online, out-of-state route and then found out that it wasn’t accepted for certification by our state. I’ve also never heard good things about teacher education programs in a for-profit school. To get the best experience, go local and in-person/hybrid.
     
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  30. RainStorm

    RainStorm Phenom

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    All of my advice was based on this post you made. Now I see you have changed your mind to middle school math? Do you realize that you need a degree in math to do that? That is a lot of coursework to go back and take, and will take quite a while to accomplish. That's the reason there is a shortage of upper level math teachers.

    If you have already taken lots of higher level college math (like trig, and calculus, geometry, and algebra) at the undergraduate level (and I'm not talking about "business math" or "statistics for pysch majors") then maybe you have a chance, but you are choosing one of the longest roads out there.

    I'm going to be honest -- you are all over the map on this. I think you are just grasping at "what would be the quickest" way to become a teacher, without necessarily looking at your unique gifts and talents, and what you can "bring to the table." If it has always been your dream to teach math to middle schoolers, and you can afford the time and expense to take all those foundation classes, then I'd say go for it, but that's not the feeling I got.

    Please take some time and think about what age group you specifically want to teach, and what subjects "set you on fire!" Then look around for a program.
     
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  31. TeacherNY

    TeacherNY Phenom

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    This is why I was confused. She didn't mention math at first. Math will take longer to get certified in if she has no background in it.
     
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  32. TeacherNY

    TeacherNY Phenom

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    But then this was in the first post. So....?
     
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  33. BrighterFutureAhead

    BrighterFutureAhead Rookie

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    I apologize for being all over the place and not consistent with my writing. I'm going through what everyone is writing here and in my other thread and it is very helpful.

    Let me answer some questions and put this information out there:

    1 - I have worked with students from K through 7 as a substitute, aftercare counselor, and a tutor. I have also specifically tutored mathematics for primarily fifth and sixth grade. That is why I was considering teaching math. Unfortunately if I have to go for a four year degree or master's degree in math I won't do that. If there are some certifications and exams/courses for me to pass then I can study for those.

    2 - I was interested in special education because I understand that the demand is high, society seems to not understand that those who are SPED are still human beings who deserve respect and love, and it seemed to be a quicker route than other options.

    3 - I understand now from what I was told that elementary is over saturated. Although I would prefer younger groups of kids I also want to make sure I can land a solid job once I am done with my studies.

    4 - From what I have been writing on here and the links provided it seems that I have no choice but to go get my Masters degree. My question now is should I pursue a masters in education, teaching theory, or special education? I need to do more research and find a school/program (although some have already been provided here) that would be accredited and accepted by New York even though I am still a Florida resident. Some of these programs seem to be anywhere from 35 to 45 credits which will take two years. I would like to know if these masters programs can include my "practicum" hours? That way once I finish the degree I can get my license and have my own classroom?

    5 - I am moving in with family in Yonkers in July/August of 2020 but need to be ready to move out sometime in the Fall of 2022 most likely. Possibly early Spring 2023 at the latest. That is my timeline. Although I have saved up a lot of money in Florida in the last two years I know that between paying for school and myself and a place to rent on my own it can be tough if I am not already an established teacher.
     
  34. bella84

    bella84 Aficionado

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    I agree with what you have been told already... You need to pick a focus based on what you're truly passionate about and not just whatever is the quickest. Teaching is a difficult job, and you need to actually WANT to teach what you're teaching.

    It sounds like secondary math is not for you. You don't already have a math degree, and you are not interested in getting one. Furthermore, your only pull towards math is that you've tutored fifth and sixth graders, plus it's a role that often has openings. You don't sound very passionate about math.

    It also sounds like sped might not be for you. You want to do it because you believe in supporting students with disabilities, and it's also a field that often has openings. But, again, it's a HARD job, one where teachers often burnout and look to leave (I am one who did). You have to REALLY want to do it - and not just because it's fast to get certified and easy to find a job.

    If your heart is really in elementary, then go for it. Just understand that, in some areas, it is there are more teachers than jobs to go around. That's not true everywhere, but it is in some places. Understand that you may need to work in a school that is not your first choice - or "give" a little somewhere else, if it's hard to find a job. But, at least in this role, you sound like it's something that you actually want to teach.

    If you are going to get a masters, then you need to look for an initial certification program, one that will lead to certification in the area that you ultimately decide that you want to teach. You need to find this school in New York, not in Florida. Your goal is to move to NY, and you likely won't begin your coursework until the fall anyway. At this point, summer grad school courses are about to begin, so it's too late to enroll in them. Honestly, you'll be lucky to clear all of the application and enrollment requirements in any grad school before August anyway. Since you're already planning to be moved to NY by August, you need to find a school in NY.

    Yes, most of these initial certification masters programs will include your practicum hours and student teaching as part of the degree/program requirements. When you finish the program, you'll be eligible to apply for a license/certification.
     
  35. bella84

    bella84 Aficionado

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    May 27, 2020

    These are just two examples of a program in NY that would suit your situation, assuming that you want elementary or special education:
    *https://steinhardt.nyu.edu/degree/ma-childhood-and-special-education-grades-1-6
    *https://www.tc.columbia.edu/curriculum-and-teaching/elementary-inclusive-education/

    I'm sure that there are others in New York, but I don't live there, and I don't know what other colleges to even look up.

    The key is that you find something that offers "initial certification" in New York and in an area that you actually want to teach. You are not going to be able to teach middle or high school, since your bachelors degree was not in a content area... unless you want to go back to school for a lot longer than two years.

    And, again, some of the application deadlines have already passed or are very close. You need to get on this immediately, if you're really hoping to stick to your timeline of having your own classroom in fall of 2022.
     
  36. bella84

    bella84 Aficionado

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    May 27, 2020

  37. RainStorm

    RainStorm Phenom

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    May 27, 2020

    If you are planning on starting a program for THIS fall (2020) you really need to jump on it. You've already missed most of the deadlines. But there still may be some programs that are still open, but those deadlines will be coming up quickly.

    Many of these programs won't even accept you unless you have already taken the basic teaching exam (in Virginia its the Praxis 1, I'm not sure what it is in NY) and those results have to be sent to the program before they will even admit you. So you may have to arrange to take those exams, schedule your appointment, actually take the test, wait for the results, and if you pass, have those scores sent to the programs where you want start. They may not even let you start taking classes until that is done. (I know my college didn't.)

    Lots of decisions to make and actions to take quickly.
     

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