I need behavior management help, pronto!

Discussion in 'Preschool' started by Miss J. Pre-K, Jan 6, 2009.

  1. Miss J. Pre-K

    Miss J. Pre-K Comrade

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    Jan 6, 2009

    So, I have a hard class and I'm a first year teacher. I would post this in the behavior section, but thought I'd get more help here.

    Problem # 1: In general, I've had trouble getting the class to settle down for circle time. We do a motion song or some body exercises before we do a large group, and I have rules for circle time that I say before we get to business. I also remind during circle, "Oh, I would love to call on you, child who's about to jump out of your skin with excitement, but I only call on friends who are sitting on their bottoms and raising a quiet hand. Still, it's a daily occurence, this battle of wills, and I've run out of strategies.

    Problem # 2: My class is having trouble cleaning up after centers. I am making them stay and clean up, and I try to schedule 5-10 minutes for it, but there are some who simply refuse or who act like they are cleaning up, but are really just standing near the kitchen set/block shelf/science table. I engage the ones who have cleaned up in a song then a book (assistant is getting out lunch). Clean-up, especially in blocks and housekeeping is taking 15-20 minutes. My assistant thinks I should ban some children from certain centers if they didn't clean up the previous day. I'm not sure if I agree.

    Problem # 3: I have one child who is very immature. He's four, but eats like a 1 1/2 to 2 year old. Picks up mashed potatoes with his hands and smears in hair, sticks hands in milk and splashes, scoots chair so far out that he drops all over the floor (and refuses to scoot up) or simply stands up to eat. I mentioned this to one of the therapists today and said he always seems to pick a seat beside me, and it's driving me crazy. She said, yeah, well, he wants your attention. Total lightbulb moment. So aside from giving positive attention, what in the name of no-mashed-potatoes in my hair can I do? I've tried praising other children for eating like they are supposed to, removing his milk/fork/whatever when used inappropriately, ignoring completely, and nothing has seemed to help. While he's one of my lower-level kids, he is smart enough to know that this is not acceptable behavior.

    Thanks in advance for any ideas you have. :hugs:
     
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  3. crayoncaper

    crayoncaper Rookie

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    I teach 5th grade, but it is my first year and I have a very hard group. And my personal life is hard, too. Haha. I don't know know if I can offer anything worthwhile, but I know how you feel. I just try to keep my head up everday. I keep praising and keep thanking those who do what they should and hope to keep them from following suit with those who stray. God Bless you and good luck.
     
  4. imat

    imat Rookie

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    I also had a hard time getting the children to clean up certain areas like the play house and block area. What we came up with was a clean up contract we called it. We had a clip board in the areas that the children did not want to clean up. At the top of the paper it stated, Clean Up Contract and under that it said “I will clean up the play house” and the children would sign it. We would remind the children as they signed the sheet of paper what they were signing that they would clean up. If that child went to another area I would say “Oh ---- you signed the clean up contract for the blocks will you go back and clean up before you move onto something else”. Every child agreed because they made that commitment to me. Not long after that they would tell me “I need to sign the clean up contract”. It worked great. Not only was the room kept clean as they moved onto something different but they all knew how to write their names and also read each others names. They would remind one another that they signed and forgot to clean up. :cool:

    http://kidsworldexploration.com
     
  5. hockeygirl39

    hockeygirl39 Rookie

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    How about taking some of the things out of the area for a little while- I find when there is too much stuff they make bigger messes and are really not playing with it at all anyway. I have been teaching for nearly 20 years I have done just about everything when it comes to clean up time- Some things work for some kids and other things work for other kids. maybe taking them out of an area for a day or 2 will work- it is a natural consequence- if you dont help clean up then you dont play the next day. bigger problem will be remembering who cant go in an area.

    as far as your group time goes- can you split the group into 2 smaller groups? one group do a "large group time" and one do an activity with your aide. then you can switch after say 15 min. I do this now mostly because of the size of our facility - I am not allowed to have all my children in one room except when we eat-so for large group times we split up. It is nice to be able to work with a slightly smaller group. you can group by age or by ability- skill you are working on ect... I really like this. We do sometimes sneak in a whole group activity but that is not till we have had time work in smaller groups and really know what is expected.

    Just my thoughts
    I am also a Head Start teacher
    Heidi in WI
     
  6. Blue

    Blue Aficionado

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    As a Head Start teacher, you should have an Education Manager to advise you.

    The Education Manager should have a list of items that you must have in the classroom. I agree that too many items creates a big mess. See if you can remove some. One of my pet peeves is having the room ultra organized. Like, do you have silouettes of the blocks, so the blocks are ultra organized? Keep clean up easy by storing the blocks in a big basket, just toss them in there. Keep the dress up clothes in tubs, not nicely hung on hangers. Put the play food in tubs, not on shelves. You get the idea.
     
  7. mrgrinch09

    mrgrinch09 Comrade

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    Jan 6, 2009

    OK, let's start out with problem #3.

    You first need to find out if the child has been evaluated in the past for developmental delays such as autism, ADHD, etc... The smearing mash potatoes in his hair, splashing in milk, not able to sit at the table, etc..., it sounds like he has some sensory issues that need addressing by a professional.

    Second, find out from the parents what his meal time behavior is at home. Do they still spoon feed him? Does he still drink from a sippy cup? Do they require him to sit at the table to eat, or does he roam around the house eating whenever he wants? Be prepared for the parents to lie to you about his behavior at home. They might be in denial about his behavior, or they could be embarrassed about his behavior and not willing to open up about it. Hopefully, they will see that you are trying to help and be honest with you.

    Some meal time strategies that you might try at school:

    1. If he needs to stand up while eating, and he can do it without making a mess, then let him eat his meals like that. There's no need to fight a battle that doesn't need to be fought. This child might not be capable of sitting down for an extended length of time, so don't force it on him right now.

    2. If he starts to play with his food then that means he's done eating. If he's splashing in his milk, take the cup away and say, "Milk is for drinking, not for playing." Give the cup back to him after a couple of minutes and give him a warning. "If you play with the milk I will take it away again". The same goes for the mashed potatoes and other food. "If you play with your food, I will take it away." Don't think of this a withholding food from a child. All you can do is provide the child with the food and give him the opportunity to eat it. If he's actually hungry he will eat the food and not play with it.
     
  8. WaProvider

    WaProvider Fanatic

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    I always thought that "ultra organized" rooms lead to issues w/cleaning up by making it too easy to get a reaction from authority!! I thought there was some magic statement in Creative Curric that said that rooms had to be that way!!! This thread is really helping me!!
     
  9. anna9868

    anna9868 Habitué

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    This sounds like a very smart approach. What age children did you work with?
     
  10. anna9868

    anna9868 Habitué

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    I'm in the same boat as you. Discipline issues is something that I deal with every day in the classroom and I'm starting to doubt that I would make a good teacher because I simply fail to accomplish things that other teachers are able to do.

    I notice in disciplining(or, having children do things) an AUTHORITATIVE kind of voice is important. I had an example of this just today. I've had a fellow teacher with 5 years experience come to my room a few weeks ago to talk and help me out. She noticed that one of my boys responds well to time-outs (whereas the director told me at the interview "we" don't use time-outs, go figure!), so she put him into time-out and then told him again to do what he refused before, and he did it.

    Today, I did the same thing. He refused to go wash his hands, I put him in a chair, he said dutifully in it, but then, when I told him to come and wash hands now, he refused again. I suspect that I'm not using the right kind of voice, the right intonation. The children can probably feel that nothing serious stands behind my tone.
     
  11. anna9868

    anna9868 Habitué

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    Has anyone read any books that were helpful in dealing with discipline at a preschool/day care?
    I like Jane Nelsen's books on discipline, but as far as her Positive Discipline for childcare providers, I didn't find it too useful.
     
  12. Sabby12s

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    1) What you are describing is what I call "waving to the monkeys in the airplane." When I child is hopping out of their seat at circle, waving their arms wildly I simply say, "I'm sorry, but I don't call on children who are waving to the monkeys in the airplane." It makes them laugh and they usually get the point. They also remember it for next time.

    2) I've done what your assistant is recommending you to do. First I use it as a consequence "If you choose not to clean up here, then during the next free play time you are choosing not to play here." Wording it this way gives them some control in the decision. You just have to make sure that you follow through.

    3) I have no real solid advice here, just more abstract. An above poster mentioned having a firm tone of voice. Its your first year teaching and it does sound like overall you need to find your teacher voice. Sometimes its not even a voice, its just a look that you give children to let them know the way they are behaving is not OK.
     
  13. imat

    imat Rookie

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    I work with 3 to 5. This worked really well. The children had fun doing it and it really did help them with the responsibility of cleaning up. I am still using it and others in the center have using it as well, with the same outcome. Children are cleaning up and making one another responsible when they see it.
     
  14. pre-k13

    pre-k13 Rookie

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    #1 Just a thought, but if you are telling the child who isn't paying attention that you would love to call on them if they would sit still, etc. you are still providing them attention for their misbehavior. I've found that it works better to point out the correct way another child is sitting. For example, today we were doing a song where the children are supposed to dance freely and then freeze when the music stops. In our classroom, the rules are that you can dance however you want as long as you stay on your letter. The kids seemed to have forgotten this, though, and I repeatedly asked them to stay on their spots. Finally I figured it out when I said, "I love how so and so and so and so are dancing on their spots! Thank you so much for following directions!" and I watched in amazement as every child scattered to their spots and stayed there the rest of the song. And also, to settle them down in the beginning, make sure you end your song session with the same song every day as a cue that it's the end of play time and time to listen.

    #2 I usually use the same method for clean up time and it seems to have worked. I've also had to explain that the longer it takes to clean up, the less time there is to play. For those who act like they are cleaning, but aren't I tell them "It is time to clean up now. Would you like me to help you put the blocks away?" and model for them how to do it, or ask another child to help. Usually the children who clean up quickly love to help and are glad to assist those who don't. I make sure to reiterate over and over that we are a class/community and we all work together to clean up.

    #3 I'm not so sure about this one, however I do have a child who sometimes has tendencies like this, but not every time. I give him a chance to sit with his friends at lunch, but watch him closely. If I see him do something that is inappropriate, I give him one warning and then tell him that if it happens again he will have to sit by himself. He has had to sit by himself a few times and does not like it so it has worked well for him. However, that's probably something that will not work for every child because some children don't mind to eat alone.
     
  15. Miss J. Pre-K

    Miss J. Pre-K Comrade

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    He was just evaluated today by a psychologist. I was hoping she was going to say he had some issues she would be able to work with, but she seems to think he's a little behind academically, but not socially/emotionally. I then went into the whole food scenario, and she suggested giving stickers/stamps to the children who are eating correctly. We can't do this . . . state (or federal?) regulations say we can't reward or punish based on food, sleep, toileting. So I'm back at square one.

    I haven't talked to mom about eating at home, but she is a single mom with three little boys . . . likely mealtimes are not consistent. I have done strategy #2 that you suggested and he usually just moves onto another food to play with. I also have to be careful, because if one of my bosses comes in, this is seen as withholding food. I thought about just letting him stand up (and I do for art or other activities), but if he's standing up at meals, all the kids want to, and spills ensue. Also, I think someone mentioned putting him by himself at a table . . . we can't legally do that. I feel like state and federal regulations dictate every decision I make.
     
  16. Miss J. Pre-K

    Miss J. Pre-K Comrade

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    An Education Manager! What the heck is that? I was not told what I have to have in my classroom until I try to move something out, and I get chewed out because "that has to stay in the classroom by law". I ask to see which law (yeah, I'm a bit of a smarta$#), but director cannot produce it. I just downsized manipulatives, and that helped, but I'm scared to move any blocks or housekeeping again. I had the blocks in tubs, but was told by director that they had to be lined up in the silouettes, and it was my job to clean up the blocks at the end of the day and make sure they're neat. Same with play food. Dress up clothes are in a three drawer unit, but I'm supposed to separate by type--clothes, shoes, accessories. Can you tell I'm about burned out?
     
  17. Miss J. Pre-K

    Miss J. Pre-K Comrade

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    Thanks everyone for replies.

    I like the clean-up contract idea. I'm not sure how it would work in my room, but it's worth a try. I've also considered having one or two clean-up supervisors each day as a job that would go around and encourage their friends to clean up and show them where toys go. Clean-up was marginally better today because I had a discussion about not dumping out everything while we were in group time.

    I'm thinking about rearranging large group times, I have two that are about 15 minutes each, but some of my kids can't sit that long. I just don't know if I should drop something or create another group time. I do need a "let's get down to business" song or chant to signal kids it's time to be quiet. Any suggestions?

    I do think I'm developing my teacher voice. Most of the kids do obey, and when they are doing something wrong, a few words or a look usually stops it. I think because I give a lot of choices, though, some are confused when it's not a choice, like cleaning up. I've also just let this one kid push my buttons.

    I recently went to a workshop on Love and Logic. It sounds similar to what I was already doing. Is it worth it to get the book?
     
  18. WaProvider

    WaProvider Fanatic

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    Can you serve his meal parts individually. Can you give him his milk, and then when he isn't interested than his bread and so on. All componenets are in front of him-but he only has one choice at a time to play with-rather than making a sensory table out of it all. It would be more work intially while you teach him that he has one at a time, but later it may make the messes more controllable-without punishing or withholding?
     
  19. Blue

    Blue Aficionado

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    Miss J; You don't have an Ed. Manager?!? Did you get any training or handouts or anything before you started your job?

    I know that there are a lot of regulations for Head Start. (If you have read many of my posts, you will know that I have held about every job in child care--and I was an Ed Manager for Head Start.) You should have check lists, and lots of support from a whole staff of people. There should be someone who can help you with each of your issues. There should be a system in place for a staffing on the "messy" eater.

    Since I assume you have no "people" support, I would recommend you go to the Head Start site and print off or order materials to provide you with guidance. As a Head Start teacher you should have a sign on code to get you into the detailed sections.

    At the very least, I would ask to see the contract your agency has with the Federal Government. It will list the types of obligations you have to meet.

    And yes, you can not do much about food--you can not reward or withhold food. Check the USDA regulations for more details. You should have a food service manager to help you.

    I will pull out my Head Start stuff and give you any support I can.
     
  20. Miss J. Pre-K

    Miss J. Pre-K Comrade

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    Blue,

    No, I've never heard of an Educational Manager. We have someone from the main office who does children's inital assessments and attends IEP meetings. Could this be her title? She only pops in to do assessments and to collect things that we have to turn in.

    My director is brand new at her job; they hired her after a year doing the "rotating" substitute job. She doesn't have her degree, is working on it. She's also in charge of two centers and divides her physical time between them. She also only talks to me to collect something or when I'm doing something wrong. Little help.

    We had about 3 days of training--we had to watch these boring videos on safety/health/etc. one day, one day we basically went over all the paperwork we had to fill out as teachers, one day was spend signing our life away with insurance and other paycheck related things. I was given maybe 15 minutes talking about lesson plans, basically when they would be turned in and what format I had to use. No information given on how the environment had to be.

    We JUST had a training on which materials we could have out in the room, which over 5 feet, which locked up. We also just found out about the food/toileting/napping regulations, although I had been pretty compliant on my own with that.

    As a first-year teacher, I was expecting a lot more support. That's why I'm on here constantly asking for ideas and support, because I don't get it in real life. I feel like I don't make enough money to justify this stuff, and this WILL be my last year in HS. I will make about the same amount if I have to substitute in public schools all next year (hoping of course to get a steady job, but if not . . .) Thank you for all of your time and support; this website has helped me stay afloat.
     
  21. Blue

    Blue Aficionado

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    How mny children do you have and do you have an aid?
     
  22. Miss J. Pre-K

    Miss J. Pre-K Comrade

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    Capacity is 18, right now we have 17, expected to get another within a week or so. 6 with IEPs, 3 ESLs, 4 children have moved and been replaced since I started in September. :dizzy: Yes, I have an aide, and she's the other reason (besides the children) that I'm still there. She's been with HS about 1 year, but still acts like a newbie sometimes. We're learning together.
     
  23. cmw

    cmw Groupie

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    .
     
  24. Blue

    Blue Aficionado

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    Okay, MsJ, I am going to give you HS 101 over the internet. Bear with me, as it is very difficult without seeing your room. Can you give me an idea of what centers you have in your room, and what your daily schedule is?

    Do you use Creative Curriculum?

    I will be back later with my first list of ideas, as I have to look up some things. We are here for you and your aide.
     
  25. Blue

    Blue Aficionado

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    Jan 9, 2009

    First do you have this form in your hands: nsnrc.org/CDI/pdfs/UGCO6.pdf

    It is the basic curriculum guide that defines your curriculum, and you must use it to plan your lessons. When you are linking children's goals to your lesson plan, this is what you use. Did anyone explain any of this to you?

    Here is a great article which might be of help:
    htt://eclk.ohs.acf.hhs.gov/hslc/resources_Bookstore/PDF/4DBIAEOF814DBIABEF.87EF38CE4C86E700B5847A.pdf

    If the links don't work, let me know.

    Now, it sounds like circle and transitions are hard for you. Here are my hints.

    1. Allow the children to choose whether to attend circle time or not. Your goal is to make it so fun, that they want to come. For the first couple of times, give out stickers or other incentives to those who come.

    2. Ease up about the quality of cleaning by each child at clean up time. Praise good behaviour and ignore those who do not help. The children will soon take care of the slackers. If a child puts one thing away, they have helped. I seldom see the children doing most of the clean up--the teacher is usually whirling through the room to get it done so they can go on to the next item. My advice is for you and your aide to "help" get it done fast to model. Then all of you move quickly to the next activity.

    Plan the transition as, "When you have cleaned your area, you may come to the art center." Each day you can transfer more of the clean up to the children. (I guess you need to choose your battles.)


    Circle time. I was taught in college that the circle time teacher simply carries on with the circle, and the aid is to manage the "waving monkies." Don't bore the children who know how to follow directions. You will loose them if you revert your attention to the behavior issues.

    When what you are doing is not working, change what you are doing.
     
  26. mrgrinch09

    mrgrinch09 Comrade

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    I see that you have the same problem that I run into often. People who are not actually in your classroom stop in from time to time and try to micromanage your classroom and tell you how things should be done.

    Ignore these people!! Don't worry about breaking their little rules and regulations. It's easier to beg for forgiveness than it is to ask for permission.

    If you think that it would work to hand out stickers during meal time then do it. If you think taking away his milk when he is splashing in it will work then do it. If you think rearranging your room will help with behaviors then do it. The micromanagers won't be able to argue with results when they see what you are doing works.

    You are the teacher in the classroom. You are in charge of your classroom. You have to be assertive with these "in charge" people the way you would with the children or else they will walk all over you. They aren't going to fire you in the middle of the year because they know that they will have trouble replacing you, or even worse they will have to be the one's who take your place. Then they will be dealing with everything you've been dealing with, and they don't want that. Besides, you said this will be your last year working for HS, so you might as well go out with a bang!
     
  27. sarzacsmom

    sarzacsmom Groupie

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    Jan 10, 2009

    first of all-- idf you are in a preschool age group then perhaps expecting them to sit perfectly still and raise their hand is expecting a little too much. Do you use circle cusions or anything to designate their seat? I use circle time cusions and my rules are this: bottom stays on the cushion, cushion stays on the floor, feet stay on the floor, hands to self. Instead of doing gross motor before sitting for circle, I integrate it into my circle time. For example-- we'll do attendance and when I hold up the child's name they get to jump up and say "here". After calendar we will do things like stretching our legs out straight and kicking our feet as fast as we can while we say the days of the week. We will jump up and down while we say the months, bend over and touch our toes while we count--things like that. this way they are not required to sit still for too long at a time. By the time we finish circle they are ready for snack time and are happy to line up for the bathroom to get ready.


    At lunch time I have a simple rule: If you are fooling around and playing with your food you are showing me you are not hungry and you pack up. It only takes a few times for them to get the message. I give them three warnings (this way they usually get some food into them). They are not going to starve to death if they don't eat all their lunch and it settles themdown ratehr quickly. If the child is trying to get your attention, it sure is working if you are having to clean up the whole mess everytime. Don't do it anymore. Food is not a toy. That's why I almost never do projects that use food unless it is something we are going to eat. Too many children go to bed hungry because they don't have enough to eat, I don't want my children to think that food is something we can play with. I tell them their lunch is not a toy, it's a tool to help your body grow strong. You need to eat it, not play with it.

    As far as cleaning up, I had the same issue earlier in this school year. I finally realized I had two choices---be frustrated all the tiem or change the environment. I took about half of the toys etc out of the room and put them in storage. things that they repeatedly took out and then didn't play with but just left laying everywhere went out. I stripped the kitchen/dramatic play area to just the barest neccessities. and I made signs for each area with pieces of velcro on them and name tags for all the kids. Each center has a certain number of velcro sptos and they have to put their name tag on the sign if they want to play in that area. If there are no more velcro spots they know the area is full and they have to play somewhere else. I have a total of 17 spots available and I have 8 children inthe class. So there is always something open. The book area and art supplies do not have limits becaue they take those things to the table and cando those things at their seats. If they go o a different center they take their name with them. so now I know who was in what area last and who is responsible for cleaning up the mess. If a child repeatedly does not clean up their mess, they are not allowed to play in that area for a few days. Each time they ask I tell them you would not clean up your mess in that area. That is not fair to me or your friends, so you may not play in there. After a day or two I give them antoher chance. Same i fthey do not use things appropriately. It doens't take very long for them to figure out that I mean it and they fix ti for themselves. Lesson learned.
    I do agree that the chiild with the sever behaviour issues at lunch time should be evaluated, but I would hesitate to automatically assume anything ---- ti may be a control and attention issue-- and right now he is in control--- I'd try to change that scenerio and if after a couple of weeks if there's no improvement I'd request an evaluation
     
  28. Blue

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    Jan 10, 2009

    I agree that it is your room and you need to manage it according to your standards. But, I would be careful about breaking some of the government regulations. For instance, any food issues are governed by USDA, and you can receive financial punishment for not following regs. If you want to give stickers at meal time and don't know if you can, call your USDA representative. Explain the issue, and s/he will let you know. We were giving food rewards for toileting, and had to stop due to regulations.

    If you have justification for re-arranging your room or removing toys, by all means do so. Anything that makes the room function better is appropriate. You must experiment with different ideas to learn what works. When you find it, you will know.
     
  29. Miss J. Pre-K

    Miss J. Pre-K Comrade

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    Jan 12, 2009

    Oh, I'm well aware that it is, in fact, NOT my room. That has been made very clear to me through the director and other boss people; when they come in over the weekend, without a word to me, and tear my room apart, moving things around, tearing down posters I had made, etc, then expect me to just come in like normal on Monday, then hell no, it's not my room. I'm just one of the occupants. When my director "helps" me rearrange my room so it suits her and the higher-ups, then no, it's not my room. As someone else mentioned, no they're not likely to fire me, because noone else with a bachelors degree would put up with this (and I feel for them next year--the position was posted about 4 months before they hired me). Still, I don't want to have constant battles with my superiors.

    It's been told to me that we can't give rewards for eating, toileting, napping at our most recent training in Jan. I'm not trying to break the law or the USDA regulations; I just had little idea what I can do and can't do before this training. I'm still not positive about everything.

    I have been trying to incorporate more movement at circle time. I do have the childrens' names on tape on the carpet, but I don't have enough room to do cushions or carpet squares. I wish I could have a bigger carpet so we could spread out, but again, I didn't make up the room layout.

    I've also been moving myself away from the messy eater. It's apparently one of my "buttons", and I refuse to make myself upset over it anymore. He has actually been doing better at a table with only his peers, instead of with a teacher.
     
  30. Miss J. Pre-K

    Miss J. Pre-K Comrade

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    Jan 12, 2009

    Blue,

    My centers are as follows: Writing, Books, Science, Manipulatives, Computer/Listening, Art, Blocks, Housekeeping. We have a sensory table outside that I try to fill with water or other sensory materials due to lack of space inside.

    My detailed schedule is on my computer at school, but from memory:

    Centers (limited to 2 centers up front) (30 min.)
    Breakfast (30 min.)
    Circle #1 (15 min.)
    Centers (kid's choice) (1 hour) (brush teeth, art project or free art available)
    Outside Play (30 min.)
    Circle #2 (15 min.)
    Lunch (30 min.)
    Bathroom, Brush Teeth, Nap (2 hours)
    Snack (15-30 min.)
    Pickup
    Extended Day (3 hours) (free play and teachers clean room)

    I would really like to see the curriculum guide. We aren't supposed to connect our lesson plans to anything--I thought it was weird--my last teaching experience I had to connect lessons to standard course of study (kindergarten). I can't seem to get your links to come up.
     
  31. teacherstuff1

    teacherstuff1 Rookie

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    Jan 12, 2009

    Everyone needs this behavior book in their library. It is Challenging Behavior in Young Children by Barbara Kaiser and Judy Sklar Rasminsky. It is a must read.
     
  32. Blue

    Blue Aficionado

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    Jan 12, 2009

    Mrs. J. All the HS I know use Creative Curriculum or High Scope. They are very similar. Somewhere along the line, your HS has failed. I don't blame you for wanting to leave. Your classroom should have copies of the major curriculum guides. I will look for the lesson plan form I uses in HS. If I can find it, I will PM it to you.
     
  33. Blue

    Blue Aficionado

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    Jan 12, 2009

    Miss J, sorry about calling you Mrs. J.

    I am very sorry that your supervisors come in and re-arrange your room. I have had that happen to me, and I was so mad I walked out, the only job I have quit on the spot. So when I say I understand, boy, I sure do. What are the other teachers like?

    Is this just a HS program, or is it a mixed program?
     
  34. Miss J. Pre-K

    Miss J. Pre-K Comrade

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    Jan 16, 2009

    No prob about the name, ha, wish I was a missus. There is one other teacher, and she's new too. She's only taught elementary before, and she only took this job because she had license transfer probs from another state. It's just HS. And I'm seriously considering quitting. I took substitute teacher training this week, and I've been poring over the net looking for jobs, openings, anything. I have some money saved up. I was yelled at three times this week for things that they *forgot* to tell me about beforehand. I hate to leave these kids in the lurch, but honestly, I just don't think I can do it anymore. I'm taking the long weekend to think it over.
     
  35. sarzacsmom

    sarzacsmom Groupie

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    Jan 16, 2009

    HOnestly my experience with headstart was that it was much easier to work there as a sub and I made good money doing it. Not that I would like to do it this way forever, but all I really ahd to do there is be there
     
  36. Blue

    Blue Aficionado

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    Jan 16, 2009

    Miss J, I am really sorry about your HS experiences. Is there another HS sponsor in your area? In my area we have 3 or 4, and I have worked for all of them. There manner of implemetation was very different. If you worked for a high quality program, you might be on here complaining about all the paperwork.
     
  37. Miss J. Pre-K

    Miss J. Pre-K Comrade

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    Jan 18, 2009

    Our HS has in-house subs called "rotators". When I said I took sub training, I meant for the public schools. Since I'm certified (have a teaching certificate) my daily sub rate would be almost the same as my HS rate, without the bus monitor duty, late days, crazy paperwork, no support, etc.

    The HS in my county and the neighboring county are run by the same agency and same staff people. I know the paperwork would still be unreal with another agency, but I think I would be able to do it if I was trained properly and knew what was expected. Right now I feel like I'm always in trouble because expectations are so unclear.
     
  38. Kase

    Kase Companion

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    Jan 18, 2009

    That's exactly how I was taught in college. We had children sit in a semi circle and while the lead teacher for that week carried out her lesson plan the aide would walk behind quietly patting a back for good behavior or if a child would act up, the aide would just pull his/her body back about a foot and then when he/she sat correctly, re join him/her to the group. It worked very well. I would also talk in a whisper sometime so then they would really have to be quiet to hear me talk and it worked! :)
     
  39. Blue

    Blue Aficionado

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    Jan 19, 2009

    I keep thinking that I have missed something about your job. Is that how you feel? Somewhere along the line, there should have been some training. Have you shared your need for more information from your director?
     

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