i need a different way to teach reading...

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Teacheroo, Aug 3, 2008.

  1. Teacheroo

    Teacheroo Companion

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    Aug 3, 2008

    my 6th graders this year (yes, i'm already in school) HATE reading! we read our second story last week and it was painful. First of all, on a whole they have very low fluency, so listening to the story when they are reading is very dull for them (and me! :lol:). I did tons of partner reading and group reading last year, but my students this year do not get along and i'm struggling to find groups and even pairs that work well together. we are stuck to open court, i can't break away from it to do lit circles or anything. So what things do you do to teach whole class reading? How do you break up the monotony?
     
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  3. MissFroggy

    MissFroggy Aficionado

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    I "invented" this version of popcorn reading. I read the text aloud, but I stop and say POPCORN and they have to read the word I am on (keeps them accountable for following along). When I say SALT, they read the whole section from that word on until the end of the sentence/paragraph. When I say BUTTER they turn and talk/summarize with the person next to them. It's fun!

    Also, try the power teaching reading method, I think it's called crazy professor?? You should be able to google power teaching and see the method in video. Warning- it is a very loud and energetic way to read a story as a class!
     
  4. Ms.Jasztal

    Ms.Jasztal Maven

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    It is called the Crazy Professor game, but if you use it, you definitely have to get expectations set for your students first. It is an exciting way for students to summarize the story.
     
  5. hernandoreading

    hernandoreading Comrade

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    MissFroggy - I love your version of popcorn reading! I may have to use this. Great idea!
     
  6. allisonbeth

    allisonbeth Comrade

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    If I have to do large group reading, I try to vary it. Last year most of my students loved to read aloud so it was easy to manage. However, I have had groups like your, too. In that case-
    Sometimes I read, sometimes a guest reader (another teacher, parent, older student) read, sometimes I have students take home a portion and practice and then read it, sometimes we listen to it on CD.
     
  7. MissFroggy

    MissFroggy Aficionado

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    I started doing that because the regular popcorn method was NOT working with my group that year either. They wouldn't listen when a kid was reading, they wouldn't be ready for their turn, and so forth. I also had a group that would just read the whole thing while one kid trudged through the first section, and put down the book/magazine or whatever, looking at me with this, "I'm done. Now what?" look. I am not much for round-robin anyway, but this seems to work. They hear me modeling fluency, but they have to read in their heads to follow along and be ready for me to say POPCORN. It keeps them accountable because they have to summarize pretty regularly.
     
  8. Beezus

    Beezus Cohort

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    Aug 4, 2008

    MissFroggy, I love this version! I'm going to try it this year with my group (whoever they are-- I get to meet them in a week and a half!). Thanks for sharing!!
     
  9. Calalilys

    Calalilys Comrade

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    One thing I do to boost reading fluency/expression/rate is to assign sections of the story to each student on Monday and then I give them about 10 minutes to practice reading their section. This allows them the chance to work through the text to make sure they can pronounce every word, to read the story at the right speed and it allows them to find their expression. Plus, it keeps the same students that always volunteer to read from always being the readers. Before each student reads, they tell the class what they wanted to be rated on (fluency, expression, rate) and then when they finish the class holds up 1 (not so good), 2 (good, but needs some more work), or 3 (perfect) fingers to show them how well they did. We spend a lot of time at the beginning of the year talking about what each of the ratings sounds like and how whatever ratings you get from your peers is to not make you feel bad, but to make you become a better reader. Since I give them the opportunity to read their section ahead of time, I rarely see any students get 1's.
     
  10. kyblue07

    kyblue07 Companion

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    For whole group readings, try adding some dramatic flair. Add accents, dialects, sound effects, music, etc to liven it up. You might also try dressing-like-a-character day or Reader's theatre presentations.
     
  11. mdee

    mdee Rookie

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    teller / checker

    I do something called teller / checker. Everyone reads a page (or paragraph) to themselves. When everyone is finished I ask a question from the page. I use students' names on cards to call on someone for an answer so that it is random. Students may not say, "I don't know". They have to answer. If they don't know the answer then they need to scan the page to find the answer. I then ask 2 more questions in the same way. Then we read the next page. This time the students must think of a question to ask me. Again I pick a name from a card and the student must ask me their question. Again they can't say, "I don't have a question." They must ask something. We do this two more times as well. The students like feeling like the teacher when they ask questions. This can also be done with partners. It really makes the students pay attention to what they are reading.

    I hope more people respond to this thread. I like these kinds of ideas. Miss Froggy, I really liked your popcorn idea!
     
  12. Lareigna

    Lareigna Companion

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    I think the first thing is to find a book that you think your students will enjoy or that they can relate to. We read The City of Ember, its fiction, with a little mystery, problem solving and there are many other things you can do with it. I would go around the room and have my students read. During it I would stop and ask them questions about what they just read (prediction on what they think will happen next, character analysis, relation to real life). When I would read I would be a bit theatrical to get them into it and excited. If I would teach LA again, I would have students act out parts of the story. I think they would get into that.
     
  13. Teacheroo

    Teacheroo Companion

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    These are great ideas! I think I'll try the POPCORN thing tomorrow. I also like the idea of them asking/answering questions for each page. Lareigna, I wish I could use some good books like that for reading, but I'm held to Open Court.

    Keep 'em coming!
     
  14. CanadianTeacher

    CanadianTeacher Groupie

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    What I do may not work for fluency, but it can help boost their interest level. I find that in grade 7, many students, even good readers hate reading. I do a lot of reading aloud. Usually my firsst novel with them is done as a read alound, but they have to follow along. They always have some kind of response assignment to do that involves thinking about the chapter/section that was just read and giving an opinion, not just regurgitation of info. I've done this for two years in a row now and it works wonderfully for all levels of readers.

    As far as fluency, when my son was in grade 6, his teacher used to give them a short one page passage, usually a biography type thing. They would get a new one each week. During the week, they would have to time themselves and read it aloud for one or two minutes (can't remember). They had to do this twice per day (it was homework but you could even have them pair up and do it in class to avoid 'cheating'). The teacher would write the cummulative number of words at the end of each line and each day the kids would have to fill out their sheet with how many words they read in that period of time. The idea was that as the week went by, the score would get better, thus the fluency would get better. They also had some comprehension stuff to do on each reading which was due at the end of each week.
     
  15. PowerTeacher

    PowerTeacher Comrade

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    There is also a game called SuperSpeed 1000 that will help increase their sight word recognition. 50% of what you read is made up of 100 sight words. 65% is made of 300 sight words.

    This game is played in pairs. It takes only a minute or two to play, and my 8th graders actually ask to play it.

    This game is free download, and you can also get the Craze Professor Reading Game (I think it is still $3) through the FREE DOWNLOADS link on my website.
     
  16. MissFroggy

    MissFroggy Aficionado

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    I do superspeed with my students (and the boy I tutor) and they love it. Today the boy I tutor said, "when it's fun and you are learning something, it can't be bad!" True.
     
  17. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

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    Aug 4, 2008

    I'm leaning towards using the Daily 5 (actually 3) this year which will be a change for the better, I think. My read-aloud will be historical fiction which is the base for my social studies curriculum.
     

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