I know she can't control it...What do you think?

Discussion in 'Elementary Education Archives' started by Christine3, Apr 24, 2007.

  1. Christine3

    Christine3 Cohort

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    Apr 24, 2007

    As I said, I know an ADHD child can not control their actions nearly as well as non-adhd children. These children also have wonderful days to horrible days. As teachers it's sometimes so hard to remain patient with them, no one is perfect! Now I will share to you what problems I have been facing with a student of mine recently...

    Here are some examples of her actions:

    - ALWAYS blurts out answers and steals other student's problems by just yelling out the answer
    -Continually touches,pokes and bothers other children (verbally)
    -Gets up almost 5 times during one lesson to "throw something out".
    - Squats in chair (like a frog)
    - I had to move a child that was sitting behind her b/c he got way to distracted by her
    - Turns around in her chair to talk nonstop to students behind her
    - Will wait before starting a task....When I ask if she is done...she makes up excuses saying she cannot find a pencil, lost the paper etc.
    - Fidgets with objects
    - Starts up conversations while other students are working and she should be working
    - Interrupts conversations I am having/tasks I am doing
    - I always have to repeat directions more than once
    - Makes sounds while I am teaching/reading- Bangs things on desk/moves paper with hand

    This list can go on but I'll stop here. She does have friends and fits in just fine now, but I worry about her future and what next year will bring.

    Do you think she might have adhd or any other disorder?

    Thanks for your time,
    CLZTEACH
     
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  3. JaimeMarie

    JaimeMarie Moderator

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    Apr 24, 2007

    So she doesn't have a disability on paper yet? Sounds like she must have something. What have you tried with her so far?
    For one of our hyper students we put a square taped box around her desk. She was not allowed outside the box during lessons or work time. This gave her the movement she needed. For another student he had two desks and could go back and forth between the two as needed.
    Another one when we saw him getting antsy he was sent to get a drink or deliver a note (this was in the special ed room, not regular ed room).

    If she fidgets with things can you get her a fidget ball, or maybe a board with imitation velvet on it?

    Also, look into aroma therapy. There are certain scents that can help calm.

    How often does she eat? Sometimes if you see her getting hyper hand her a cracker with peanut butter (if not allergies). That might help to calm her. Also, some students react well to sour candy. Some how it calms them down. I used to give one of my students one sour gummy every hour or so. It worked. I don't know why.
     
  4. Erin Elizabeth

    Erin Elizabeth Groupie

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    Apr 24, 2007

    Ha ha, if I didn't know better, I'd think you were describing my one difficult girl. I wish I knew what to tell you! I'm sure my student will be tested in the future, because I know her parents are having a hard time with her at home too. If you've tried multiple interventions and none seem to work, can you refer her for assessment?
     
  5. Mrs LC

    Mrs LC Comrade

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    Apr 24, 2007

    I have a boy in my grade who sounds very similar - he has ADHD. I have learned to stop the behaviour that matters (calling out - they CAN be trained to raise their hands!; touching others - a huge no-no; distracting others) and ignore the rest. It intrigues me to watch him when I read to the class - he will be absorbed in the text, but will move places 3 or 4 times in a 15 minute session. Since he is silent I leave it - to draw attention to him would be more distracting since most of the class don't even know what he's doing. I don't have a problem with him getting up to put something in the bin, pick up a piece of paper, etc, as long as he doesn't disturb others and still gets his work done. He's learned that fidgeting is okay with me as long as it's silent, so he taps his pencil on his knee instead of the desk, for example. I tried giving him a stress-ball, but most of his fidgeting is done without thought, so he'd forget to pick it up and would tap his pen anyway.

    When this lad calls out he gets a little more leeway than the others, but I sometimes have to warn, "next time, name up" - then I follow through. Since I am very fair, he takes it well. Sometimes when he's really jumpy I will send him for a run around the oval.

    So overall I don't fight his need to move, I accept it and sometimes encourage it, as long as he is not interfering with his own or others' learning. He's a lovely kid, really quick and intelligent and very entertaining in conversation, so I guess that makes it easier to go with the flow too. :) I am also agreeing that it sounds like your student definitely has ADHD, but whether or not you have an official diagnosis doesn't matter - you and this student still need to work out a plan you can both agree on.
     
  6. teachingmomof4

    teachingmomof4 Groupie

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    Apr 24, 2007

    It could be any number of things. ADHD, ODD, a form of autism...
    I guess you'll just have to work out a plan with her and meanwhile, try and get mom or dad to take her in for a diagnosis.
     
  7. sllecompte

    sllecompte Rookie

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    Apr 25, 2007

    It sounds like you are going through the same torture as myself with my girl student. However, she is paranoid on top of everything else!! All day-"Stop looking at me! Leave me alone!" I have paid close attention to this and many times a student is not doing anything to her. Her mother said she was the same way. What is up with that? This is not normal behavior!! However, the mother and grandmother took her to the doctor and he said that she was just a normal six year old. PLEEEEASE! I believe that there is definitely something wrong with her. Does your student suffer academically because of these actions? Surprisingly, her strength is in comprehension(listening, because she can't read). She came to me after the first 9 weeks with o.k. grades. She can't do anything and will fail next year. However, she has the points to move on. The grandmother has made the comment of holding her back. I can't imagine another 178 days of h*** with her. Is your student going to pass?

    My student smirks when I get on to her. I think she gets a thrill out of seeing me frazzled.
     
  8. Teaching Grace

    Teaching Grace Connoisseur

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    Apr 25, 2007

    I have the perfect guy for her.... he's in my class and is exactly the same way... as a matter of fact right now he's mumbling under his breath about me because i told him to get to work and stop coming up with excuses to get out of doing work ( my finger hurts, we're only supposed to do 100 problems and 25 times 4 equals 110)... and sadly that last example, the worksheet he's working on is multiplication...
     
  9. bonneb

    bonneb Fanatic

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    Apr 25, 2007

    I have one or two just like this. One I have had all year and he has matured and learned some self control, enough to remain with the group most of the time. The second one came to me only recently. I have had to really work with him. The kind of behavior you describe is unacceptable for any child, ADD or not. Those with ADD have a harder time staying on task, but they have to have manners so others can learn.

    I would isolate this girl a bit away from the group so she can't just keep distracting those around her. If she wants to squat like a frog, let her - it isn't interferring. Choose one behavior and work on that. It might be fun to have the class make little signs on popsicle sticks that say "I know!" or "Pick me" and have them hold up the sign to be chosen to answer the question. This might help her keep from blurting out and interrupting - I know how frustrating that is!!! I feel like my brain is swiss cheese from all the interrupting and lost trains of thought this year!
     
  10. Christine3

    Christine3 Cohort

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    Apr 25, 2007

    Thanks for everyone's support and advice. I really appreciate it!!
    I don't want to refer her to the "support team" quite yet, until I do more research on what I think it might be. She is a very bright student and is always involved. The issue is that she is so HYPER. Today I couldn't even keep track of where she was.

    We were just about to review a packet for their Math test tomorrow and she got out of her seat to throw "something out". Instead of walking right back over to her desk, she went all the way around roaming the room. (taking the long way back) I said "Sit down please and take out your packet." She listened the first time!
    (big step) When we were going over it I brought up a stool and sat right infront of her desk. She hardly talked to others with me right there. So I'm still confused...if she can control it with the right interventions?
    What do you all think?

    Thanks again!
     
  11. mrs a

    mrs a Companion

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    Apr 25, 2007

    ADHD students will have their good and bad days, but it is important that they always know that are EXPECTED to behave. Lots of times, we excuse it as part of their illness, and tend not to discipline b/c they can't help it. I have been guilty of this in the past. They CAN and SHOULD learn the rules. They will not follow them to a T, but it sounds like she is putting forth very little effort. Find what consequences and rewards really hit home for her and use them to your advantage. Start a daily incentive chart with her. Let her place her sticker after a long day and have lunch with her on Friday if she earns all or most. SOmetimes these kids are shunned often enough that they are actually just dying for your attention.
    I agree with letting her walk around when she needs, and NEVER take away recess. Seat her in the back, or give her a special seat in close proximity to her classmates but far enough that she can get up and move if she wants to. Let her stand up by her desk. Give her a job that requires her to get up. Board eraser works well b/c we erase at the end of a lesson or at a transition in the lesson.
    Accomodate her disability but don't let her use it as an excuse.
     
  12. deserttrumpet

    deserttrumpet Comrade

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    Apr 25, 2007

    Sounds like one of my kids - except he's in highschool! I knew one teacher who made a seatbelt - a strap of felt that she placed over the child's lap. Instead of saying he was out of his seat she would comment that he wasn't wearing his seatbelt (because it had fallen the floor). I also like the idea of marking a box around the kid's seat.
     
  13. Christine3

    Christine3 Cohort

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    Apr 28, 2007

    Thanks for your help everyone!

    I am at my wits end with this girl. She is driving me crazy! I spoke with the child privately on friday. This was because she left the class early?! One of the other girls were locking her out (holding the door shut) and laughing when i walked over. She claims that girl pushed her out. But i was over at my desk helping another student. So I really don't know the exact story. She has walked out of the class before though and I did speak to the other girl.

    This student is NEVER in her seat and when she is it's not her assigned seat! She shouts out inappropriate comments in class and continually interrupts me.

    Should I make a phone call home(this would be my third time talking to the mother) on monday, or wait and see if my talk with her helped?

    Thanks once again!
     
  14. cutNglue

    cutNglue Magnifico

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    Apr 28, 2007

    Also when training students to learn how to cope with themselves, it is helpful to have the same strategy applied each time, use preventive maitenence (help them make their environment work for them) and use repetitive key phrases to help them identify what they are doing and when. Don't be afraid to be firm (just make sure there isn't something you can't amend before hand). They do have to learn to cope with themselves and be expected to behave. You have to give them the tools. They have to work with it.
     
  15. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    I would call home. Describe the types of behaviours you are seeing and how they impact the class but don't attach any labels or judgements to the behaviour. Ask the parents if they see the same behaviours at home and what strategies they have found useful. It sounds as though your support team works differently than ours; our teachers meet with the support team (Special Ed teachers and admin) when they have concerns about a student, have tried some interventions (in consultation with the student and the parent) and these haven't worked. The team is then responsible for figuring out the next step as far as interventions, testing, or recommendations to the parent are concerned. We don't expect the teachers to have researched what they think the problem may be. Remember, we can't diagnose.
     
  16. dillpickle

    dillpickle Rookie

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    May 1, 2007

    I used to make mine my classroom helper when he was acting fidgety. I'd use him in my lesson to do things on the board or to set up the overhead. It kept him engaged in my lesson. This my be inaccurate, but it seems like my old counselor told us not to tell the parents to take their children in for testing b/c then that teacher would have to pay for it. Does that sound right to some of you out there? I just don't know how that works. I'm clueless as to if this is correct.
     
  17. dillpickle

    dillpickle Rookie

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    May 1, 2007

    Call home!!! Maybe they'll recognize the pattern and take her to the doctor.
     

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