I have an interview on Thursday.

Discussion in 'Job Seekers' started by bros, Oct 7, 2014.

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  1. bros

    bros Phenom

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    Oct 13, 2014

    I have no idea what either of those things are :p

    The resource room didn't differentiate beyond what books they were allowed to pick from for independent reading.

    I did find it odd that all they did were worksheets, but that is all I observed. My pre-professional field experience was once a week for 15 weeks. The only time they had forms of assessment other than worksheets were the... two language arts lessons I taught - i'd have them either talk about whatever it was while standing up at their desk or talk it over with their tablemates, things like that. Hell, during my classes, we were told the terms pre-assessment, formative assessment, and post-assessment and their definitions, but never really any examples. It was worse how depending on what professor you had for the class on how to teach <LAL/Science & Math/Social Studies>, your experience varied greatly. If you had who I had for "Science and Math in Elementary Education" you spent 12 weeks on math, 1 week on the midterm, 1 week on the final, and one week on how to teach science. Also, the entirety of the midterm & final consisted of high school & college level algebra problems. If you had the other professor, you spent 12 weeks on science, 1 week each for midterm & final, and 1 week on math. The professor I had the second time around for Social Studies in Elementary Education was excellent, though. He taught us how to teach social studies in a variety of age groups in the elementary setting.

    I know that elementary education requires me to be a generalist, which I am (though, admittedly, Science would probably be the hardest for me at the elementary level, especially with how some science curricula have experiments, some of which would require dexterous on my part).

    With CAFE/Daily Five, I didn't mean it like that. I meant it in the way of "it is one philosophy for reading instruction that people follow"

    Professional Development is incredibly important to the development of an individual in practically any field. One of the most important traits of a teacher in my opinion is that they should want to be a lifelong learner.

    I think I might've said doing a read aloud every day, but I didn't phrase it like that.

    I've been trying to become a sub in my local district since January. Every time I call, they have another excuse for not bringing me in for an interview.

    Why am I only trying in my local district? Anywhere else and I'd earn maybe $30 for a day's subbing - then i'd lose that amount in SSI, because the only car service that is actually licensed to operate in my town doesn't give receipts (or take credit cards, they are a cash-only business), so I can't claim an Impairment Related Work Expense to stay below the SGA threshold.

    I did talk to my CT and my supervisor (I was even rated as an accomplished professional intern by both), but my placement was... put together at the last minute, as the TPC is wont to do. As a result of their lack of research/failure to accommodate until a week into the school year, I was placed in a Kindergarten class, then after two days, I was told I couldn't spend the whole day in there and that in the morning, I could only teach what my cooperating teacher taught and nothing else - no taking over the class, because the gen ed teacher taught everything outside of math. In the afternoon, I was placed in a general education Kindergarten classroom, where I taught maybe one lesson a day, then they'd have centers, which my cooperating teacher would choose which had them learn while having fun (doing starfall, making letters out of play-doh, playing letter identification games on the iPad or smartboard, or things like letting them place with toys or blocks, which help with social skills).

    None of my classes brought up centers until I got to the co-req of pre-professional field - although the special education department was going through some changes during my first... two semesters at Kean (I transferred from a CC). The special education department was much more organized by the end of my time at Kean than the beginning, which was a relief.

    We probably had the same professor for LA/Reading - she gave everyone an A, at least in my class.

    There's just some kind of disconnect between how I actually am in the classroom when I am teaching and how I am during interviews & posting on here. I do not know if it is lack of experience outside of... controlled situations or what, but it is something. Perhaps it has something to do with the dose increase of my seizure meds in May. I think they might be affecting my mood slightly.
     
  2. Bunnie

    Bunnie Devotee

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    Oct 13, 2014

    Bros, I know there's a lot of legal things related to you situation, but can you take that risk and lose out on that $30 to get some exposure? You really need experience subbing. It might not seem worth it money wise but experience is key.

    I know you mentioned before about being able to take a train to some schools. Waiting since January is just too long. I think that ship has sailed to sub in your home district.

    Also do you have your masters? Maybe going back to school might make you more marketable.
     
  3. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Oct 13, 2014

    The phrase is "close reading" (pronounced with /s/, not /z/); a cloze activity is something else. Both are relevant to the teaching of reading, and both are good terms for the beginning teacher to know and use.

    bros, you are far from the first person to graduate from a university with no clear idea how to answer the question "Do you know about X?" While there do exist circumstances in which a satisfactory response is "Yes" or "No", bros, it is much more often the case that such a question constitutes a request to show, in ways appropriate to the setting, what one knows about X. When viewing old family pictures, for example, "Do you know who that woman is?" is a request for more information than merely "Yes" or "No". If the person asking is a new friend, you're being asked for information that the asker doesn't already have: you might reply, "Oh, that's Francine Holt. She's the sister of my dad's paternal great-great-grandfather, and she was the most sought-after caterer in Hoboken, back before World War I. Her Spanish rice was legendary. Great-Aunt Sally says she was married three times, and she was the first person in town to own a Model T Ford." If the person asking is Great-Aunt Sally, she's making sure that you know the family lore: you'll reply, "That's Great-Great-Great-Great Aunt Francine, the one with the Model T Ford and the Spanish rice," and that will probably suffice. You already know that, of course - but the point is that "Do you know X?" in an interview setting works pretty much exactly like being interrogated by Great-Aunt Sally.

    In the context of a teacher interview, the question "Do you know about close reading?" gives you an opportunity to demonstrate to fellow professionals that you too know what close reading is: who does it (student vs. teacher), what it's good for, how it fits into the larger pedagogical picture, and (where applicable, as it is in this case) how it can be taught.

    So let's try this question again, please.

    Do you know what close reading is?
     
  4. bros

    bros Phenom

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    Oct 13, 2014

    I do not have a masters. I just paid off my student loans this month, so I suppose it is possible that I could go for a masters, i'd just have to figure out what school I should go to - there's a private university that is a ~30 minute car ride away that a lot of teachers in the area went to (Pretty much if they don't go there, they went to where I graduated from) - then there's other schools in the state, like Rutgers.

    With the district I live in, they haven't actually approved anyone to be a sub (Outside of retiring teachers) since pretty much the meeting immediately after I submitted my sub paperwork.

    No, I am not familiar with close reading. But from a quick review of internet articles, it appears to be a concept in literary criticism where emphasis is placed on individual words and syntax in a passage, rather than the passage as a whole. It has students gather their first impressions of a passage, and essentially review the passage and analyze it as if looking at it under a microscope. It seems like it would be a useful strategy when dealing with a particularly important part of a text - perhaps after reading a story, students could go back and close read specific passages to see if it reminds them of something later in the story or if it can serve as a snapshot of what is taking place in the passage, etc.
     
  5. kcjo13

    kcjo13 Phenom

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    Oct 13, 2014

    Bros, you are so focused on the past and what you could-have, should-have, gotten from your program.

    Guess what? Get over it.

    You registered for classes, you paid tuition, you attended. You don't get to stipulate what they do or do not teach you. All you can do at this point is suck it up, stop harping on about what you didn't learn, and figure it out.

    Sorry to be harsh, but not sorry. Your student teaching thread is CHOCK FULL of seasoned professionals telling you to ask someone, tell someone what you need, check this check that-and you giving us reason after reason for why you couldn't.

    Maybe you don't care, maybe you don't really want this or any other job, but to put it bluntly-if you don't get over it, stop making excuses, and learn about the things teachers are telling you you will never get a job. :dunno:
     
  6. bros

    bros Phenom

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    Oct 13, 2014

    I can't help but focus on the past because that is what bubbles to the surface in perfect clarity.

    The problem with some of the advice given in the student teaching topic was not that it was bad - it was good advice, but some of it was given too late to be of any use - one example being asking the principal to observe me. Someone suggested that the first week of December. The principal's... father, I believe, died the day after someone suggested I ask the principal, she was out for the rest of that week and the week after. Then when she came back, she was out of her office the entire final week of my student teaching at meetings throughout the district and doing required observations of teachers that had to be done before winter break.

    I'm not making excuses, I am trying to put things in perspective - so you understand my point of view and where I am coming from.
     
  7. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Oct 13, 2014

    Bros...don't go for your masters yet...it only makes you more expensive...(and if you are receiving some kind of aid, costing NJ taxpayers unnecessarily)....you currently are averaging two interviews in ten months and those interviews have lasted in sum total about 20-25 minutes. Your home district is putting you off for SUBBING when most districts are thankful for warm bodies... You aren't presenting yourself here on the forums in the best light as a candidate when you have time to research and reflect, bros....your comments on how you've interviewed don't portend a good result.
    You have not been well served by your college to not know enough to self promote, ask questions, seek information, go above and beyond...did no one offer you advice bros? Surely others in your program have had successful experiences...
    What next, bros? Have you remotely considered this might not be the career path for you? You have so much to offer in terms of your sped law and technology knowledge...these seem much more of a passion for you than teaching (your ST posts had very little to speak of in terms of the kids, their learning or a ha moments). I'm just trying here to hold up a mirror. If you can't remember how you did on the interview or can't clearly communicates what you know in person or online, how are you going to best serve your students! Because that's what it's about, bros...serving our students...
    I wish you well.
     
  8. AdamnJakesMommy

    AdamnJakesMommy Habitué

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    Oct 13, 2014

    I'm not ELA, but what is DRA and Cloze?
     
  9. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Oct 13, 2014

    DRA is a leveled reading passage assessment system.

    Cloze reading is using what one know about vocab/phonics to predict words within passages.
    Close reading involves careful reading and re-reading of a text in order to analyze it on multiple levels for deep comprehension.

    DRA is a pretty old system, although I'm sure it's been revised and updated.
    Cloze isn't so new and is useful in vocab development or with struggling readers.

    Close reading is fairly current...you can find lots if you search!
     
  10. RainStorm

    RainStorm Phenom

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    Oct 13, 2014

    bros,

    Like you, I am also significantly disabled. I had to leave a career because my disability became overwhelming in what was, a very physically demanding career.

    While recovering from my 19th reconstructive surgery, I decided to become a teacher. I also went to a school that didn't provide all the education I needed to be successful. We didn't learn how to do a running record, a DRA, or other such things. We did learn about centers, but not enough to be proficient at it. I had two student teaching experiences where I basically learned what *not* to do as a teacher. (One of my CTs used to punish students by "putting them in the low reading group". And she actually called it the "low reading group." You aren't the only one who has had less than stellar experiences.

    As soon as I completed my ST, there were no full time positions open, so I volunteered at an elementary school, and low-and-behold, the principal noticed me, and the next thing I knew, I had a full-time job (at another school... she passed my name on).

    The first year was a huge struggle. I was still recovering from my last surgery, and had some long-term disability issues to deal with. I learned what a DRA was, and how to do them. I took a class the district offered on how to do a running record, since I needed to do them on a regular basis with the DRA.

    Using the DRA as an example, I personally don't know how you are going to manage giving DRAs from the way you describe your disability. They require quick hand motions to mark every single word a student says, and quickly write whatever mistakes they make. They are timed, and there is no time to make a label, or other such things. DRA's are not available on iPads yet, and even if they were, I'm not sure you could keep up with that, at the speed they go. If a child is reading 110 words per minute, then you have to be able to check off the words and write out miscues at that speed -- 110 words per minute. It is how you evaluate reading in elementary school. The DRA is not offered on any computer program, and it isn't something you could put on the computer.

    You need to volunteer at a school and get some real experience, and once-and-for-all find out if you really can physically do this job,
    or you will never realize your dream of becoming a teacher. I feel sad for you that you have spent so much time and effort on something you don't seem to be able to do.

    Maybe it is time to look into another field -- working for a center of independent living as a peer counselor or advocate, as a special ed advocate, or something along those lines.

    I think you are deluding yourself into thinking it will all work out. I hate to be that blunt, but based on everything you've written, I think you might need to look at other options.

    I will now wait patiently while you tell me all the reasons you can't volunteer at a school near you -- because that is what you do -- come up with a dozen or so reasons why you can't.
     
  11. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    All right, let me analyze your answer to my question.

    1. "No, I am not familiar with close reading." Those words signal that you don't know what you're talking about. I'm going to ask you to do this differently shortly.

    2. "it appears to be a concept in literary criticism..." No. Wrong domain. No interview for elementary-education positions of any kind is going to ask you about schools of or approaches to literary criticism. They're going to ask you about terminology that relates to elementary reading instruction - from which it follows that "close reading" turns up in elementary reading instruction, which in turn means that you need to read through the Wikipedia article on close reading (I like Wikipedia for this purpose, by the way) to find where it focuses in on reading instruction methodology.

    If the Wikipedia article doesn't shed light on reading instruction, you need to keep looking. Rummage through the links on the Wikipedia page to discover whether there's another Wikipedia page that's more apposite. Better yet, research the term on one of the collection of reading-methodology Web sites that you ought to be bookmarking. (I like SEDL and FCRR for technical explanations, Reading Rockets for explanations in more accessible form, and Learner.org for videos that show instruction, but there are many other possibilities.) And get in the habit of making your Google search terms more specific. I just began to type "teach close reading" and, by the time I'd got to the "a" in "reading", my browser served up half a dozen search terms that others have used, including several that zero in on elementary school.

    The terminology of reading instruction HAS to become part of your own vocabulary, because so much of elementary education is wrapped up in teaching reading: these terms are tools of the trade to which you aspire. Looking up terms will reveal more terms for you to look up. Get in the habit of rehearsing them and using them - and keeping an ear out for new trends to research. No teacher can afford to wait for the information to come to him or her. "Close reading" in reading instruction is particularly associated, these days, with Common Core. I typed "common core close reading", and Google served up page after page after page of useful-looking links.

    (I'll add that close reading does not mean placing emphasis on "individual words and syntax rather than the passage as a whole. That suggests a dichotomy between words and syntax on the one hand and the passage on the other, and the fact is that the passage CONSISTS of words and syntax. Close reading is much more about getting a grip on the passage by paying attention to the author's specific choices when it comes to words and syntax.)

    3. Strategy for whom? Strategy to accomplish exactly what? Please be clear - as any elementary teacher must - on the difference between the strategies that students and other readers use to make sense of text and the instructional strategies that teachers deploy in order to teach students when and how to use the reading strategies. It's pretty clear here that you don't perceive that difference.

    4. You never dealt with the matter of how close reading could be TAUGHT. Stating what students could do comes nowhere close to explaining what or how YOU are going to TEACH.

    That's enough analysis for now. You have work to do.

    Take another go at the close-reading question - but first, go research close reading again. Look for strategies that show that a reader is using close reading AND look for instructional strategies through which a teacher can teach students some aspect of close reading. Your observation and student teaching should have served up examples that you could use to illustrate various aspects of close reading for your own, but you don't seem to have trained yourself to notice them. That being the case, search the Web for videos on what close reading in elementary education looks like and how to teach it. Take notes and look for connections as though you actually believed that this stuff matters. Search A to Z, even. If you do this right, you'll learn about close reading, but you'll also learn about other aspects of reading instruction.

    Having done your homework, THEN write me a response as though you already knew this stuff and as though I were an interviewer whom you needed to dazzle with your accuracy and precision. Pay attention to the properties of a successful teacher-interview answer that I've already outlined.

    Oh, and please don't beg off on grounds that your teacher-licensure program didn't prepare you to do this. In the first place, that's not a reason, it's an excuse, and it's getting very, very hoary. In the second place, neither did mine. But I've learned how to learn.
     
  12. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    I've already explained close reading. As for cloze-with-a-z, a fill-in-the-blanks question is, at heart, a cloze exercise: if, after reading a passage or studying a unit, students can restore the key content words that have been removed from a sentence and replaced with blanks (for instance, "A fill-in-the-blanks question is, at heart, a _____ exercise"), we presume that they understood the content and the vocabulary reasonably well.
     
  13. bros

    bros Phenom

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    Oct 14, 2014

    Yeah, I know going for a masters now wouldn't be the best choice, especially with the job market in NJ.

    Also, the only aid I receive currently is Supplemental Security Income. I get a $42 monthly supplement to my SSI from the state of NJ (or something like that. It's high 30s-low 40s). So it is nothing major.

    I didn't start applying for jobs in earnest (outside of a few LTS positions that were posted near the end of my student teaching) until the middle of March.

    And i've been on three interviews, not two (This one made my third interview).

    The interviews have lasted longer than a total of 20-25 minutes. I would say the first one lasted for 10-15 minutes, the second lasted for 10-15 minutes, and the third lasted for 15 minutes, for 35-45 minutes total.

    My home district hasn't posted a listing looking for subs in a long time - the person in charge of dealing with sub paperwork said she only got around to the sub paperwork backlog around June/July and that when they start interviewing substitutes again, I am at the top of the list to get called in for an interview to sub.

    At the end of my capstone (December 2013), one person out of 75 had been offered a job, and only around seven people had been called for interviews.

    Some people that graduated in 2013 managed to get jobs for this school year.

    Some people that I went to HS with that graduated from different colleges in 2012 who are teachers had to move out of state to get a job, or had to get a job in another field altogether, so they could pay off their student loans.

    During my student teaching, my posts were rather terse and to the point because by the end of the day, I had... used up my energy, is one way to phrase it. I am an introvert.

    Also, didn't want to speak much about the kids because I was being extra careful about confidentiality. I adored those kids and visited them every chance I got. I loved their voracious appetites for learning - and none of them noticed that I did things a bit differently from their other teachers (But that is because they are Kindergartners). I learned a lot about my teaching habits throughout my student teaching and with advice, I was able to correct some bad habits I had (for lack of a better phrasing) and I was able to improve in all areas that were noted as areas of improvement throughout the experience (I improved in classroom management, but substituting was recommended to help... fine tune & work on my classroom management skills).

    Careers outside of teaching were considered when I failed the first pre-professional field experience. My Voc Rehab counselor did a career interest inventory/career assessment. Outside of jobs like "Fast Food Manager, Video Rental Store Manager, and Department Store Manager" Elementary/Kindergarten/Special Education Teacher were in the top 10. If you want, I could dig out the full report and type up what jobs it said would be best for me. I know it stated that my ability to spot errors/perform clerical tasks was exceptional (standard score of 160)

    I can remember the interview, I am just not good at assessing how I do in social situations, unless there is an obvious cue as to if I did good or bad.

    I can clearly communicate facts and ideas verbally and in [type]written form when I am in the classroom setting. I have different... faces, I suppose is a way to describe it but maybe it might be better phrased as "Some people have a different behavior/demeanor/whatever you want to call it in private/at home than when they are in public or at work."

    I know many people who had CTs who were examples of "What not to do."

    Like the person in my capstone whose CT went on the first day "Okay, here's the pacing guide, here's the book, now you teach starting tomorrow until the day you go and you get my job, because I am retiring as of the first of the new year."

    I know the volunteer policy in my district, and I know that some former graduates of the district are permanent volunteers - but they are all students with cognitive impairments.

    The volunteer policy in my district is that you can volunteer five times with principal & teacher approval, then you have to get background checked and approved by the board before you can go in a district school again. So i'd have to figure that out.

    But I still think that subbing would be more valuable of an experience.

    But something is better than nothing.

    I cannot do hand motions with any sort of real expediency - well to me, it feels fast, but compared to anyone else, I am slow.

    Why would it be impossible for DRA to be put on the computer? If it is simply checking what they read, and noting what mistakes they make, that could be done through the use of a digital voice recorder and a scanned PDF of the page to note things.

    Just because I cannot write with consistency, endurance, or legibility, does not mean I cannot write.

    Although my old special education teacher told me that if elementary didn't end up working out for me, I should get certified K-12 and try High School. But I think HS would be difficult for me because of my... soft spoken voice.

    The SSA hearing judge who heard my case in 2010 said if teaching didn't work out, I should look into advocacy/law.
     
  14. swansong1

    swansong1 Virtuoso

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    Oct 14, 2014

    New day, same stuff.
     
  15. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Oct 14, 2014

    Second verse, same as the first.
     
  16. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Oct 14, 2014

    My career inventory said that I should be a podiatrist (I hate feet), about 18 different kinds of nurse, or a master puppeteer. A master puppeteer. Those inventories can be sort of useful, but they aren't the be-all-end-all of your career options.
     
  17. txmomteacher2

    txmomteacher2 Enthusiast

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    Oct 14, 2014

    I think I have to step in on this one. I will admit I have not read everything that has been written by BROS and I truly do not know the whole story. That being said from what I have read just in this post, there are some of you who with a good intentions I am sure (at least I hope) have been what I think as being mean to the original poster. One of the reason why I keep coming back to this forum is most of us are here to inspire, help, and support those who come here. Although I have seen how some of you can be truly judgmental of anyone who doesn't share your philosophy, or somehow they are different. You are condescending and put people off. Sometimes even I have felt like those of you who answer a post that I have written really do think that you are better than everyone else. I am very smart person, I truly love my job, I am well liked by those who really matter, and I think I have pretty firm grasp on teaching. We come here for SUPPORT, not to be told to find another job. There have been many times I have found myself writing a post and then not post it because I am worried about how certain members will perceive it. You should not have to worry about things like that in an open forum. We should all be more helpful, even if at home we shake our heads and go WTH was that person thinking doing that. Please in the future I implore you to think about the other persons feelings before you post. With all this being said I do see that BROS does hold their own when it comes to people trying to "help" Hope I haven't made anyone mad, just wanted to have some of you think about how you are "helping" those who really need it the most.
     
  18. bros

    bros Phenom

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    Oct 14, 2014

    I am just trying to provide my point of view so you can understand where I am coming from.

    I explain my circumstances.

    Do you understand that?

    I am not some kind of super independent neurotypical individual. I can never be that everyday 20-something person. I will always be affected by my disabilities in some way - be it passive, with the fact that I cannot drive - or active, where my dexterity may hamper my ability to do something on the spot - such as fill out a form. I will always need some form of assistance or accommodation, as I will never be able to be anywhere near as dexterous as my same-aged peers - or even those 10 years my junior. I'm trying my hardest with the cards I have been dealt.

    Obviously, someone thought I was good at teaching if I received such a high grade during student teaching - or they saw the potential.

    Yes, but can be useful for putting someone in the right direction.
     
  19. kpa1b2

    kpa1b2 Aficionado

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    Oct 14, 2014

    DRA has an online component. There is also an app for iPads. It's $12/student. Not in my school's budget. Here's the link. http://www.pearsonschool.com/index.cfm?locator=PSZ4Z4&PMDBSOLUTIONID=&PMDBSITEID=2781&PMDBCATEGORYID=&PMDBSUBSOLUTIONID=&PMDBSUBJECTAREAID=&PMDBSUBCATEGORYID=&PMDbProgramID=119381

    No idea how it works on the iPad. I will say that when I do a DRA, I only mark the incorrect words, when I have the story in front of me. If I'm doing it without the words, then I do every word.
     
  20. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Oct 14, 2014

    Bros, your ST placement was unconventional at best. You were given limited opportunities to take on meaningful teacher roles according to your posts at the time. You were in your home district where they knew you and your history. I'm sure they wanted you to succeed.

    We all want the best for you, truly. But more importantly, we want the best for kids. You have been given great advice here on the forums about job searches, interviewing skills, improving your practice and it seems that the advice is often met with reasons why you can't...I don't think you come here expecting members to delude you just to make you feel better. So the advice might sometimes feel critical or harsh, but it's coming from seasoned teachers who know what getting and keeping a job is like. The day to day challenges of new standards, high stakes testing, SGOs, new evaluation systems, tenure reform have only served to make what was a challenging job even more difficult...it's A LOT even for those at the top of their games. The truth can be difficult bros....and while getting a teaching job is not impossible, the odds are not necessarily in your favor based on what you've shared.Yes, you have potential...for many things. But its hard to imagine from your posts that a classroom is the place for you to reach your potential.

    We are in a high stakes, highly competitive state, bros. Even less desirable, urban districts receive many many resumes from highly qualified and experienced candidates....your home district where you did your ST alone has a glut of resumes for SUBBING positions...so much so that they haven't even gotten around to calling you for a sub interview since January despite them seeing your potential...You've overcome many obstacles in your life, bros, and that is something that should be celebrated...my most heartfelt wish for you is that you find a career path that is the perfect fit for you, where you can succeed and reach your potential...no teacher would want any less.

    Good luck to you.


    And by the way, my career inventory advised I become a horticulturist or to work in a garden center or farm. Yes, I love gardening but I know it wouldn't have been a fulfilling career path for me.?



    My district doesn't use DRA, but despite being in a high SES system, the $240 It would cost for this would use up 80% of my yearly classroom budget. Pricey....One can do running records and comprehension checks for no cost using benchmark texts.
     
  21. kcjo13

    kcjo13 Phenom

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    Oct 14, 2014

    I think the thing that makes people frustrated with bros is that we DO see potential in him. From everything he has shared, he has a great start in an advocacy related job and it just screams to me that it would suit him so well.

    In other threads, bros has good solid advice to give. He is a great sounding board for anyone dealing with special education issues. But then, he turns around and gets...stuck...on an education job that is clearly not a good fit.

    It's like a huge waste of ability and time.

    So yes, people do come off sounding mean and hateful, but I have to believe that no one would continue posting the same advice over and over if we didn't really care.

    We care about you bros! You're quirky, and special, and somewhere there is a great job waiting with kids that need your advocacy skills...we just want so badly for you to find it.

    One thing...you mentioned a brother in education. I missed this up til now. Does that have something to do with your persistence in a classroom job?
     
  22. bros

    bros Phenom

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    Oct 15, 2014

    I'd pay for that out of pocket and claim it as an impairment related work expense - which it would be.

    I was in my home district, but none of the teachers at the school I was placed in knew me - well, the SLP knew me (she was my SLP when I was young) and the enrichment teacher knew me.

    My interview skills are lacking. I know this. I think I am getting better with every interview, it's just that I find interviews difficult. As I have had them, one-by-one, I find it easier - for example, when I was in the office waiting for the principal to interview me, I was not nervous this time.

    I don't expect to be deluded but it would be nice to be treated kindly. You might be treating me kindly but I might not be seeing it that way, probably because I have really low self esteem and take most statements as an attack on me personally rather than ways to improve myself - that is, until I have a little while to process the comments and figure it out.

    According to the person in charge of subs in the district, they haven't interviewed subs in many months - because of a combination of getting behind on paperwork due to lack of personnel and that they are not currently interviewing substitute teachers.

    I applied to sub in a nearby district today, where the cost of a taxi ride would range from $12 to $30 one way before tip.

    With a DRA app, I would do as I said above and pay for it with my own money and claim it as an impairment related work expense on taxes/with the social security administration (as every dollar spent on IRWE lowers the amount considered earned by the SSA, which helps with the medicaid threshold, which through a state program is around ~$60,000 a year - and of course, at that point, I would be paying a small premium to keep medicaid, which is very very helpful in picking up co-pays & various other expenses my primary insurance doesn't cover)

    No, my brother being in education doesn't have anything to do with it. He's not disabled, but he is doing... worse off in school than me - he started in 2008 and might do student teaching Spring 2015. He majored in one of the Sciences at a state school, then transferred to my school after his GPA tanked - then he became a K-12 History major. I tried to convince him to make it K-12 History SPED, but he was worried about being shoved into special education jobs that he might not be comfortable with.

    The one thing that annoys me most about not being employed is the fact that I am not doing anything - on one hand, I enjoy the free time when I have something to occupy it - be it a movie to watch, a TV show to binge watch, or a new video game to play. But when I have nothing to occupy the time I am rather bored and am just doing things to do things (like I will catch myself doing one of my routines over and over again for like 5 minutes straight before I realize "Hey, you aren't going to get any new emails, no matter how many times you refresh the page")

    However, on the other hand, there is a part of me that nags, sometimes more than others, that I might not be... psychologically ready to have a full time teaching position yet - perhaps due to subconscious concerns regarding my lack of ability to be independent or something of that nature.

    Having such a vivid memory is quite annoying at times. Sure, my memory can go on the fritz in highly anxious situations and when I have a seizure, but the rest of the time, I remember pretty much anything I am told to remember. Sometimes, I remember it a few days late, though. Darn ADHD and issues with complex integrative memory.
     
  23. a2z

    a2z Virtuoso

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    Oct 15, 2014

    Bros, while you don't have a full-time position, you should have a full time job. That job should be reading and learning about as much as you can about education and what is out there. There have been several topics that have come up here and at least one poster gave more specific information about what is out on the internet for free for you to use to learn from. You could be using 8 hours a day learning.

    Also, are there any jobs out there that you could do that aren't teaching. I know money gets taken away if you earn money and you do have to find transportation or pay for it, but if you could volunteer or find some sort of part time job, it would be best for you. It will make you look more rounded of a candidate.
     
  24. kpa1b2

    kpa1b2 Aficionado

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    Oct 15, 2014

    :agreed:

    Although I do have the DRA kit, just not the iPad version. I do have a free running records app on my iPad. I'm not a fan of using it though. To me, it's more cumbersome then a piece of paper and a pencil.
     
  25. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Oct 15, 2014

    We don't use DRA in my district...(we are more workshop model, TC assessments, running records in my area of NJ) however, I remember using DRA when I was a student in 6th grade :D... I'm sure it's updated now and a valuable tool...but like anything., it's a resource...the OP would be well advised to know about a variety of assessment tools as schools vary in their preferences and requirements and candidates should be able to communicate a strong message of who they are as teachers...No one should be so tied to a packaged program or method that they become less marketable as a candidate. Having served on my school hiring committee, we kind of tune out once a candidate seems dedicated to only one way of delivering instruction. Best to go on philosophy and be knowledgeable about many strategies...:2cents:
     
  26. teacherintexas

    teacherintexas Maven

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    Oct 15, 2014

    What reading instruction book did you decide to read?
     
  27. bros

    bros Phenom

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    Oct 16, 2014

    Haven't decided yet.
     
  28. teacherintexas

    teacherintexas Maven

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    Pick one and start reading. Since you aren't working, you could finish the D5 book in less than a day.
     
  29. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Oct 19, 2014

    So two Fridays have passed...hear anything?
     
  30. bros

    bros Phenom

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    Oct 20, 2014

    Nope. At least I had the interview for the experience, though.
     
  31. bros

    bros Phenom

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    Oct 20, 2014

    Just checked their agenda for their board meeting and googled the person who was hired - they hired someone who has been subbing for the district for a while - they were a junior in HS in 2004-2005, so they graduated the 2005-2006 school year and they did their student teaching in the district I live in Spring 2012 - they got hired as MA Step 1 for the LTS job - so they have their masters.
     
  32. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Hiring someone with a Masters is more expensive than hiring a compelling candidate with less credits. The candidate was probably hired more because of a great interview as well as his/her experience in, knowledge of, and good reputation within the school.

    Was this the way you found out that the hiring committee passed on you or did you receive other notice?
     
  33. gr3teacher

    gr3teacher Phenom

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    I really hope you are thinking seriously about non-teaching contingency plans. I mean... you graduated almost a year ago and you aren't even so much as on a sub roster. That's not a good sign, no matter how many subs your local district already has in the system. The longer you go without being in a classroom, the less attractive you are going to be to an administrator.
     
  34. Ms.Blank

    Ms.Blank Companion

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    Oct 21, 2014

    I'm not concerned about the fact that you looked up the board meeting info, I'm more interested in the fact that you seemed to google this new hire and found out what year in school they were and their student teaching semester...was this just so you could more easily compare yourself to this candidate and see where you fell short?
     
  35. bros

    bros Phenom

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    Oct 21, 2014

    This was how I found out - they said at the interview I would find out if I weren't notified before this board meeting.

    Also, just checked the agenda again - they updated a revised version this evening due to clerical errors - the person was hired at BA Step 1 - they had incorrectly listed certifications/degrees of some new hires (that LTS and a few custodians).

    I applied to another district to be a sub, but it isn't like I can apply to one of the subbing services in the area (Well, the only one I know of, based on reading district sites, most of the districts manage their own sub lists, except one, that contracts out to a service) - it would cost around $120 for a round trip taxi ride to one of their group interviews. The subbing services only services one of the eight districts around me, anyway, and it is a district that pays subs low (around $70 a day, and it would cost around $40-50 round trip a day to get there)

    That, and the name seemed familiar. Wanted to see where they went to college - maybe we had a class together - if they had any previous LTS positions - something. Turned out their name was familiar because a small fundraiser was held for the family when I was in high school. I remembered the last name from one of the flyers I saw in the hallway in HS. It was a green flyer as it was near the end of the school year and the school was out of white paper.
     
  36. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Oct 21, 2014

    Bros, consider the cab fare an investment. Even if you break even on a sub day, you are getting experience...something you need desperately.
    Your unwillingness to step outside the box is holding you back from much that this world offers whether you end up in education, or more likely not....where do you see yourself, realistically, in 5 years? Ten? Further out?
     
  37. TeacherNY

    TeacherNY Maven

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    Oct 21, 2014

    Start calling around and find a neighbor, cousin, someone who can give you a ride to the sub interview. Offer them a few bucks but it would be a lot cheaper than the $120 cab. There's absolutely nobody who can give you a one time ride?
     
  38. Ms.Blank

    Ms.Blank Companion

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    Oct 21, 2014

    I agree with this. I understand if you feel this would be exhausting to do every day...it would stress me out, for sure! What if you only did it a few times a week, or a couple, or even ONE day a week? You'd still be gaining experience. Subbing experience is great for future teachers (there is something about going into different teachers' rooms and seeing how they operate things that is so inspiring). Besides that, you'll be keeping your resume up to date with education work, which is ESSENTIAL in this hiring time period. Even if you break even or just barely make money for the day, I'd try it. (Did you say somewhere else that if you started working, it would affect your disability that you get or something to that effect? I forget...because I could see why this could make your decision more difficult...regardless of how much experience we all want bros to obtain, we all need money to live, just my :2cents:)
     
  39. kaytea1203

    kaytea1203 Rookie

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    Oct 21, 2014

    I'm new to the forum, but I've read through the post (and a few more!). I cannot agree with czacza more. See it as an investment! As a May 2014 graduate in NJ, I know how tough the job market is. Luckily, I've secured a position, but from many rejections this summer, I realized that schools want to hire candidates with EXPERIENCE. In NJ, you could have started subbing at 60 college credits. Did you? You are most likely going up against people who have been subbing for two years already. I know if I were looking to hire, of course I would choose someone with more experience. Day-to-day subbing is an absolute must. Not only will you personally gain so much from subbing, it will help you have experience to pull from during interviews to support your answers. My suggestion would be to stop waiting on your home district. Move on and pay some extra $$ to get this experience. I'm not sure where you are located in NJ, but schools around me are constantly updating and growing their sub lists. Best of luck to you, bros.
     
  40. Linguist92021

    Linguist92021 Phenom

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    Oct 21, 2014

    I would also suggest to do whatever you have to to get some subbing experience. If you have graduated a year ago, and haven't even subbed yet, a potential employer will look at your resume, see that there has been a year gap already with nothing education related in it and will pass you on.
    You can keep making excuses or make it happen.
     
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