I have a wonderful problem with a studen

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by minnie, Aug 18, 2016.

  1. minnie

    minnie Cohort

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    Aug 18, 2016

    I have a problem that is actually not a bad problem. I teach kinder and I have a student who can multiply and read chapter books. There is nothing in my class that would even remotely challenge him in any way. I would recommend moving him up to first grade but I'm afraid that he isn't mature enough. He still acts like a kindergartner. I'm talking to our one and only 1st/2nd grade combo teacher and she said she would consider taking him for her math block but that still leaves the rest of the day. My other kinders need a lot of attention so I have no idea how to meet his needs. I don't want to just give him a basket of chapter books and put him on the computer. Even my higher level activities for our math and reading curriculum is a piece of cake to him. Any ideas on how I can meet his needs?
     
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  3. readingrules12

    readingrules12 Aficionado

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    Aug 18, 2016

    I could multiply before I entered Kindergarten as well. I am so thankful that my teacher had the sense to not move me up to 1st grade. I didn't have the maturity for it. I was so thankful though that she brought in 2nd, 3rd, and 4th grade math books and worksheets. She allowed me to play school with them and work the math problems. I thought I was in heaven.

    Accelerate the child as much as you can with enrichment and more challenging work. It isn't as time consuming as it sounds. Once you teach him a few advanced concepts and provide the challenging work, he will fly on his own. The other parts of the day, he can be a 5 year old and work with the other children. Getting late now, but I will try to get some more specifics another day for you.
     
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  4. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Aug 19, 2016

    Does this kiddo just know his multiplication facts by rote or does he have a strong underlying number sense? Since he's a reader, you could maybe give him a word problem or two per day?
    Reading- same thing...is he calling words or does he have deep comprehension? Give him some reading response activities: draw a picture of fave part and write a sentence or two about it, poster of main character and character traits, etc etc
     
  5. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    Aug 19, 2016

    I would focus on deepening understanding of concepts rather than worrying about teaching material at a higher grade level. Our K program here has moved to an inquiry-based program; perhaps you could work with your student to develop some inquiry questions related to his interests. You could then gear his reading to finding the answers to his questions.
     
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  6. MissScrimmage

    MissScrimmage Aficionado

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    Aug 19, 2016

    My nephew is 4.5 years old and can also decode chapter books. However, his speech is really delayed and I really question how much of the book he understands. I totally agree with what czacza said - check his comprehension before going forward with chapter books and then work on challenging his understanding. Most books at a really high level likely won't be very interesting for him anyway, since he has the maturity of a kindergartener, so you can teach comprehension skills with lower level texts that he enjoys.

    Also, I find when children are quick to learn how to read, they don't develop the same awareness about reading strategies as average/struggling readers do. Most of my high flyers really start to struggle when they have to actually work at reading. He may need to work on reinforcing some strategies.

    I'm sure, like with my nephew (who we are actually holding back another year because of a late birthday) there are lots of skills he does need to work on with peers his own age!
     
  7. Leaborb192

    Leaborb192 Enthusiast

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    Aug 19, 2016

    You may not move him up to first grade, but is there anyway you can buddy him up with a 1st grader for math & reading practice? Maybe talk with the 1st grade teacher and say, "Hey I have this kid, do you have any who need help OR any well behaved kids who would like a friend to read and practice math with?" It doesn't have to be anything too extensive, just maybe find 30 minutes in the day to work together? I did reading buddies with 3rd/5th grade (my third graders actually could perform better and helped the fifth graders) and it was fantastic!

    You want to put his little mind to work and not just give him a all this independent work and say, "go!" It's easy to do that, but see if you can try that.
    :)
     
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  8. minnie

    minnie Cohort

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    Aug 19, 2016

    Thanks everyone for your replies! To answer one of the questions above, yes, this student know has a deep understanding of numbers and knows what he reads. His mom made an extra copy of his sister's 1st grade homework last year and he was understanding it more than his sister. I gave him the beginning of the year assessment for 1st grade and he just flew by it. He even gave me the reasons as to why he answered certain questions and his thought process.

    So....I talked to the first/second grade teacher and showed her his assessment and other things he has done and she agreed to have him come to her in the morning before lunch for 1st grade math and reading. Then after lunch, he will stay with me so he can still be with his peers and be a kindergartner. His mom was thrilled.

    Monday our class is learning about the numbers 1 and 2 and the letter A. This kid is waaaaaaay above that. I have a interesting bunch this year so it would have been difficult for me to really get this kid alone to really give him the skills and attention that he needs.
     
  9. Leaborb192

    Leaborb192 Enthusiast

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    Aug 19, 2016

    See! ;) :handfist::handwaving::handwaving::thumbs:
     
  10. showmelady

    showmelady Companion

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    Aug 28, 2016

    I was reading by kindergarten. In fact, my mother had to get my library books for me as I was not allowed to check out adult level books at that age.

    My teacher let me be her "helper" and I that kept me interested and busy. I got plenty of reading at home. By second grade I was a big fan of her SciFi collection! But at school it was "Dick and Jane" (this was a really long time ago)

    Helping the teacher kept me busy.
     
  11. christie

    christie Rookie

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    Sep 3, 2016

    THIS! There is a very big difference between being able to spit out math facts and word calling. I often work with students who can tell me what 7x5 is without understanding what they're actually doing. Students who can read at a 3rd grade level but then not be able to tell me what they've read (or if they can, they don't understand the implicit, only the explicit).

    Does your school and/or district provide gifted services? I would track someone down who can help you with these things. I know it's going to be difficult to find time to meet with him alone, but that's probably what you're going to have to do. It doesn't have to be for long, but he needs instruction on his level. How is the social piece going? Very often students who are gifted can have social issues and in kindergarten, addressing those can be as important (or more so) than his academic needs.

    As you assess him, work to find out where he is at the kindergarten level whether it be behavior, social, or anything else, and come up with a plan to help him grow there (this will also help him feel like he's part of the group because he's learning with everyone else). Then I'd figure out where he is academically and what can be realistically done in your classroom to help him grow. If you need to ask for help, ask for it. When there's push back point out that the school will do everything it can to serve and help students who are two standard deviations below the mean (SpEd), but seem to have issues doing the same for students who are two standard deviations above the mean.
     

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