I have a few questions...

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by TennisPlayer, May 10, 2010.

  1. TennisPlayer

    TennisPlayer Cohort

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    May 10, 2010

    Today I was substituting at a school I'm familiar with but there are new students who are challenging with their behaviors so I'm seeking advice to see how it compares to what I'm usually doing:


    1. How do you respond to students who tell you ________ did _______ to me (but you didn't happen to see it so you're not sure if they're telling the truth or trying to get someone in trouble.)

    2. How do you prevent getting frustrated even if you don't look frustrated to others when certain kids keep doing the same things that you don't want them to or argue with you when you've asked them to do something, even asking them to go over here for a time-out.


    Those were the most common things I was challenged with today since some of the students have disorders.
     
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  3. Zelda~*

    Zelda~* Devotee

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    May 10, 2010

    1. I ask my students "Did you use an I statement?" and "Did you walk away?" (I statements are something we work on a lot in my room) Then if they persist I have a tattling form they can fill out. :) I offer it routinely---they always turn me down. If they keep bugging me about it, I make them fill it out.

    The best part? The tattling form makes them list 3 good things about the person they are telling on. :D

    Of course, I handle the matter myself if it is a safety issue. But...it never is. At least not thus far.

    2. I get frustrated too sometimes, so perhaps I'm not the best person to ask. :D
     
  4. smalltowngal

    smalltowngal Multitudinous

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    May 10, 2010

    1. If I didn't see it, I normally tell the tattler that I'll be keeping an eye on the situation, and if I see it again, then I'll talk to the student. There haven't been too many times where I've actually had talk to a student.

    2. I get frustrated too. In a case where the students are continually to do something I've asked them not to do, I normally take the student out in the hall and ask them what they're doing in call, what they should be doing, and what they're going to do to fix it. Then I ask them what should happen if they continue to break the rule. In the case of a group of students, there's always at least one ring leader, and they're the ones I talk to.
     
  5. WindyCityGal606

    WindyCityGal606 Enthusiast

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    May 10, 2010

    One way to avoid having students tell you someone did something to them that you don't have the chance to witness is don't let them have that opportunity. Keep them seated at all times and keep a sharp eye on them while they are under your supervision. Keep them too busy to get into trouble. I know that sounds easier than it is especially when you are subbing. Still, if there's a way to avoid misbehavior, that's one way. Our school has a serious zero tolerance rule so kids know that if they accuse someone of something, it will be investigated to the fullest by our disciplinarian so they usually don't want to go there.

    As far as how not to get frustrated from kids repeating misbehavior, I would hope the school has someone to deal with repeated disobedience. It's not fair that you have to put up with this when you're coming in to cover someone's class. Isn't there any support from administration?
     
  6. Nate

    Nate Companion

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    May 10, 2010

    1) "That is completely unacceptable behavior. Unfortunately, I can only persecute offenses I witness", with the vocabulary turned down to meet the students' level. This confirms their sense of injustice, but still avoids a he said/she said.

    2) It's the ABC formula--you can't change the Behavior, so do what you can about the Antecedent or Consequence.
     
  7. Toak

    Toak Cohort

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    I call over the other student (assuming its something that would warrant that) and ask if it happened. They always either admit to it, or explain it a way that makes sense - ie one student told me a boy was grabbing butts. By calling the boy over, I determined that he wasn't intentionally grabbing butts, but was trying to shove his way through a crowd (which is also bad but not as bad as going up to other boys just to grab their buttocks)
     
  8. CFClassroom

    CFClassroom Connoisseur

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    May 11, 2010

    In your position I would tell them they needed to write a letter to the teacher about what happened. This way it's in their own words and documented. With all of the bullying hype lately and the new law, schools are cracking down (which is good). However, this means that if something happens and it comes out that it happened before and you were told about it then it could get you in hot water.

    The other positive to this is that it eliminates stuff that they don't deem worthy of taking the time to write about.
     
  9. HeatherY

    HeatherY Habitué

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    May 11, 2010

    1. "Is this a tattle or a report? Is someone being hurt?" Usually it's a tattle and they figure out that you don't want to hear it. If they persist then have them explain why they need to reort the issue- they can usually deduce that it really wasn't important and give them a really bored look.
     
  10. MissSkippyjonJones

    MissSkippyjonJones Comrade

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    May 11, 2010

    I totally understand what you're saying, but I think the OP (and they can correct me if I am wrong!) is talking about the times when they aren't around, for example, when the student comes in from recess saying that "So and so kicked me!" The students are being supervised (hopefully!) but not by the teacher (most of the time). For instances like that I tend to assess the situation (is the student visibly hurt, etc.?) and 9 out of 10 times I simply ask "Did you tell the noon-aid?" If they say "no" then I tell them that it happend when I wasn't there so they needed to tell the adult who could have helped them. (I think that made sense!)
     
  11. futureteach21

    futureteach21 Habitué

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    May 11, 2010

    I like iheartrecess' idea!
     
  12. Toak

    Toak Cohort

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    May 11, 2010

    I once had students do that. Most often I was quite positive that all they had told they had done had not actually happened (as I had sometimes fully observed the incident and they weren't as bad as they said they were)
     
  13. FourSquare

    FourSquare Fanatic

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    May 11, 2010

    "Are you snitchin' or tellin'?"

    This is all I say now. 99.999999999999999999% they're snitching. And I don't have time for that. There is for real not enough minutes in the day! Sometimes I follow up with "I don't want to hear it unless you're on fire." :lol: They know this means I need to know of emergencies only. However, occasionally this backfires cause students think I don't care when someone's bothering them and take matters into their own hands by kicking/punching/etc.

    As for getting frustrated, I do all the time, so I have nothing for you. Sometimes they just blatantly refuse to follow directions, and I don't really have any real consequences. Most everything is a slap on the wrist at my school. The office will send kids back. They don't care about recess detentions or after-school or phone calls home. :dunno: I try to explain how their actions affect others and what my expectations for them are. Maybe they'll get it eventually.

    Good luck.
     
  14. hac711

    hac711 Companion

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    May 11, 2010

    I usually say "oh that's nice, dear.." like they told me they have cookies or something, and walk over to someone doing what they are suppose to be doing and say something like, Wow, you are really coming along in your cursive!" Sometimes kids just need a distraction. They usually stop when they don't get a response from me.
     
  15. shouldbeasleep

    shouldbeasleep Enthusiast

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    May 12, 2010

    For minor tattling:
    "I'll keep an eye on him/her. Thank you." It's just easy and fast. If the tattling is a constant problem, then I'll go into detail about how to handle different types of problems. We just did a great bullying lesson from Edteacher that had ways to respond to verbal harassment.

    For constantly having to repeat behavioral expectations:
    Depends upon the situation. If it's off-task causing a commotion like interrupting during teacher instruction, and I've done the usual stand next to them, discussed it with them in the hallway, moved them away from the source of amusement, sit them on the floor next to me, then I'll move the student to another classroom where there is a desk in the back of the room.
     
  16. Rox

    Rox Cohort

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    May 12, 2010

    I have a paper on my wall that I use for group rewards. Each day that the students behave well, I add a letter to the word. For example, I could have the word "RECESS" or "PIZZA PARTY". I don't tell students what the word is, I just have blanks for how many letters are in that word. Usually the kids can figure it out halfway through the word. So when someone tattles, I ask them, "oh, shoot, does that mean we can't get a letter for today?" and they usually take back what they said.
     
  17. MissSkippyjonJones

    MissSkippyjonJones Comrade

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    May 12, 2010

    I had a coworker tell me that they used to have a stuffed toy in the corner of the room and if the kids really needed to tell someone what happend they could tell the toy! This often solved their issue!
     
  18. clarnet73

    clarnet73 Moderator

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    May 12, 2010

    When I worked at camp, they gave us 4 answers to tattling, depending upon the situation...

    1) thanks, I'll take care of that
    2) I don't think you need to worry about that
    3) How could you handle that?
    4) I didn't see it happen, but I'm glad YOU know how to behave

    #4 is by far my favorite, as much for the reaction it provokes from the kids (huh!?!?!?!)... #3 empowers them, #2 reminds them to myob, and #1 is useful upon occasion :)
     
  19. CiniMini

    CiniMini Rookie

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    May 12, 2010


    LOL At a workshop I went to a teacher said she had a picture of the George Washington behind the door. When someone would tattle she'd tell them that was too big of a problem for her so they'd need to tell President Washington.:haha:
     

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