I have 2 children who just don't hear rhymes

Discussion in 'Preschool' started by Miller59, Feb 15, 2012.

  1. Miller59

    Miller59 Companion

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2008
    Messages:
    216
    Likes Received:
    0

    Feb 15, 2012

    Really -- they just don't hear them. Both children are 5 and will go to Kindergarten next year. I work with them in all the ways I know -- songs, books, making silly words, eraser rhymes, sorting objects, 1 on 1, small groups, whole groups.....They both also struggle with hearing the beginning sounds of words.

    I am at a loss as to how to help them with this skill of hearing sounds. Is this something a kid just has to grow into? Is there a method I'm missing? I can see on the face of one of the children that she knows she's not getting something her pals are getting. The other child doesn't seem to see that.

    It's not that i think that these kids are doomed if they don't get rhyming at this point -- but it is a mystery to me.
     
  2.  
  3. tracykaliski

    tracykaliski Connoisseur

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2008
    Messages:
    1,927
    Likes Received:
    1

    Feb 15, 2012

    I would do a search for phonemic awareness activities and try to do some of those with the children.
     
  4. Ambrosegirl84

    Ambrosegirl84 Companion

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2009
    Messages:
    162
    Likes Received:
    0

    Feb 15, 2012

    I have a 5th grader who still struggles some with rhyming, yet is an excellent reader (gonna get that checked out!). I don't know much (okay, ANYTHING) about preschoolers, but I bet if you keep on plugging away at it they will eventually get it. My "rhyming" kid was a great reader while his classmate struggled with sounds through 1st grade, and now the kid that struggled is scoring advanced in all areas and is a skilled reader, as well.

    Again, coming from someone who knows nothing about preschool, I would just say keep it fun and multisensory, and keep track of the progress they're making.
     
  5. WaProvider

    WaProvider Fanatic

    Joined:
    Apr 26, 2008
    Messages:
    2,661
    Likes Received:
    0

    Feb 15, 2012

    There is often a tangle, in my experience, until the children figure out that the "find the sound at the beginning/middle/end" is a game that differs from the "rhyme" game. Sometimes it is as simple for me as teasing the two games apart. I agree, phonemic awareness games are the only way to go. First sounds, splitting words, blending them back together, last sounds...these are all things that are NOW at preschool. However, they used to not be what preschool hinged on. When Kinder was LEARNING the ABC's and so on PreK was play and we will write down what you learned for you. Now that Kinder has had to revamp....so do we. I know you have heard all that before....but that was the basis of my answer. The fact is that it is developmentally appropriate for some children to have issues with these tasks at these ages. They can't read the standards...they don't know.

    If your one child is sure she is not catching something they others are not......I would worry more about that aspect. See, the more fluster she gets...in my opinion....the harder it will all be....reading included.

    Check and see if she has some of the other skills....can she hear a word that is a broken up and blend it? Can she break it up? Does she have initial or end sounds? Maybe she has just been working somewhere you didn't realize.
     
  6. kpa1b2

    kpa1b2 Aficionado

    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2002
    Messages:
    3,274
    Likes Received:
    38

    Feb 15, 2012

    I have a couple of kinders who really struggling with rhyming and phonemic awareness in general. We just keep working at it.
     
  7. dcnuck

    dcnuck Companion

    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2005
    Messages:
    187
    Likes Received:
    0

    Feb 15, 2012

    What the others are saying--alot of kids it will take them longer to 'get it'. Just keep working on it and track how they do. My one suggestion that might help is to try music by Jack Hartmann. He has two "Rhyming to the Beat' cds that the kids love.
     
  8. MrsNPreK

    MrsNPreK New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2012
    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0

    Feb 15, 2012

    I don't have any advice except to say that I think rhyming can be a difficult skill to master for some kids....some kids seem to take longer to "get it."
     
  9. Blue

    Blue Aficionado

    Joined:
    Nov 16, 2005
    Messages:
    3,591
    Likes Received:
    3

    Feb 15, 2012

    I am one of those people who is phoenically challenged. I can't identify sounds at all. I can rhyme. I have other sound issues--I can't play music or sing, or learn a foregin language. I don't know if any of this is related, but that is my story.
     
  10. Miller59

    Miller59 Companion

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2008
    Messages:
    216
    Likes Received:
    0

    Feb 15, 2012

    I think I'm phonically challenged too. I can't sound out words at all or spell.

    We play lots of games all the time and will continue to do just that. I will look for the Jack Hartman cd's. I try to keep the focus on the classroom on play and social skills -- and I am accountable for presenting certain material. I know you all can relate.
    These 2 kids just don't hear the sounds in words -- yet -- and I want to be sure I'm not missing something that could help them.
     
  11. WaProvider

    WaProvider Fanatic

    Joined:
    Apr 26, 2008
    Messages:
    2,661
    Likes Received:
    0

    Feb 15, 2012

    Put the skill in even more places than you have it....if she is on to you....she may freeze when you get to the same looking plan.

    Transitioning to a one at a time place? Make a rhyme song out of the kids' names. My buddy who's name rhymes with Tob can go to x. When the kids yell Bob he will know. Then you say Tob, Bob....yep, that matches that is a rhyme. And off Bob goes to do x. When you are doing ANYTHING rhyme! And read rhyme books.....make it an immersion class. Won't hurt the others and she may find an area in which her brain is open to the concept.
     
  12. MissCeliaB

    MissCeliaB Aficionado

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2009
    Messages:
    3,432
    Likes Received:
    603

    Feb 15, 2012

    Try holding their hand, palm down, in front of their mouth while they say the words, or yours while you say the words. They may be able to feel the difference in where the breath lands on the hand. I had a kid once who could only tell rhymes using this method. He had an auditory processing problem.
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

  1. miss-m
Total: 210 (members: 1, guests: 181, robots: 28)
test