"I Hate Reading"

Discussion in 'Third Grade' started by MissKH81, Nov 3, 2009.

  1. MissKH81

    MissKH81 Rookie

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2007
    Messages:
    92
    Likes Received:
    0

    Nov 3, 2009

    What do you tell a parent when they ask how to encourage their child to read at home? I have my own "set of answers," but I would like to find out what other teachers tell the parents of their students when it comes to motivating their children to read independently. Thanks!
     
  2.  
  3. Peachyness

    Peachyness Virtuoso

    Joined:
    Jul 14, 2006
    Messages:
    6,181
    Likes Received:
    1

    Nov 3, 2009

    Well, I firmly believe that if a child hates to read, then the best thing one can do is find books that the child is interested in. And maybe come up with a game??? I'm trying to think here. I guess I'm thinking similar to AR points. Maybe make up some sort of goal. Like, if the child is into soccer, then after the child reads 5 books (can be picture!!! books) then maybe a fun trip to a soccer game and pizza afterwards would be the reward. Or, if the child is into animals, after reading 5 books about animals, a trip to a farm or zoo. Just some ideas!
     
  4. Peachyness

    Peachyness Virtuoso

    Joined:
    Jul 14, 2006
    Messages:
    6,181
    Likes Received:
    1

    Nov 3, 2009

    Oh, what about getting some sort of neat penpal (like someone the child looks up to) and have him write letters to them. This will require reading the letters he writes and then reading the responses.
     
  5. tgim

    tgim Habitué

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2006
    Messages:
    845
    Likes Received:
    0

    Nov 3, 2009

    I try to have parents read w/ a child at some point weekly, or even nightly for young students. Make it cuddle time, share your love of books, pick books that are high interest for the child. Reading TO a child (not homework reading) can go a long way toward developing a positive attitude toward reading and books, too.

    Often parents try to TEACH when reading to/with a child. Just read and enjoy - do page-swap reading or just read to the child.

    Another technique that helps to build fluency is to do "impress" reading where you hold your child on your lap and read chorally, or aloud together. The parent sets the pace and uses proper intonation and expression; fade out when your child is reading a part that seems easy for her, take the lead when it is more struggling text. (Still not "teaching.")

    Do ask questions, prediction questions or "why" questions rather than straight recall questions. The key is to build a fondness for reading upon the foundation of shared experiences reading together. Does that make sense?
     
  6. blindteacher

    blindteacher Cohort

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2009
    Messages:
    568
    Likes Received:
    0

    Nov 3, 2009

    An eye exam doesn't hurt either. Hating reading is a classic sign of eye problems that have gone unnoticed.
     
  7. MissKH81

    MissKH81 Rookie

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2007
    Messages:
    92
    Likes Received:
    0

    Nov 3, 2009

    Interesting angle. I'll investigate :)
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

Total: 215 (members: 0, guests: 193, robots: 22)
test