I hate my job.

Discussion in 'New Teachers' started by Miss Beazly, Jan 20, 2008.

  1. Miss Beazly

    Miss Beazly Rookie

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    Jan 20, 2008

    I am a first year teacher, but this is a second career for me. After my own children moved out, I finished the degree I started years ago and was very excited at the prospect of teaching.
    I was offered a job at my first interview in a very small district and took it. I have to commute about forty minutes one way.
    The first semester was tough simply due to the workload. I teach 7th through 12th grade, 6 different classes. I had developed a pretty good system by Christmas break, but when we came back in January, the administration decided that some Reading groups needed to be changed and one of my Semester groups changed. It's like the beginning of the year now with these groups.
    Add to this that the disciplinary procedure at the school is a joke and the place is micro-managed by everyone from the secretary to the janitor. Everyone seems to have an agenda.
    As if this weren't enough, I don't even make enough to afford my own place. I am renting a room in a house.
    I don't know if I can last until the end of the year let alone continue in this profession.
    Any suggestions? Is this typical?
     
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  3. terptoteacher

    terptoteacher Connoisseur

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    Jan 20, 2008

    I'd say it's pretty typical. Your first year can be full of trials and tribulations. There is a lot of things that aren't talked about in teacher prep programs.

    I'm big on fixing what bothers you and I'm big on BABY steps. So, my advice is to find one thing that bothers you that you CAN fix and try.

    I'd stick it out to the end of the year, and then look for other options. Not all schools are micro managed like yours seems to be.
    My old school was--like you said, even the custodian! I got in trouble because I left the cd player on. It wasn't playing, but the little red light was still on "cd" on the switch and not on the "off" position. He told the principal that I was contributing to a fire hazard.

    I just re read your post and you said that at the beginning of the year things were tough, then you got it going.:) Now things have been switched. Well, I think you'll probably get it going again and it'll all be ok by the time summer comes. Anyone who can raise children, go back to school, finish a degree and get a job right off sounds like they can handle things.

    As for the money??? Well,,,,, no one goes into teaching to make money! Right?:p
     
  4. Ms. T

    Ms. T Rookie

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    Jan 20, 2008

    Please do not allow this first experience to dissuade you from teaching. Like you, this is my second career. My first experience was a horrible disaster that made me feel that I had no right being in a classroom. I survived that experience, left that district, and found the dream job. It is still hard, stressful, and challenging but it is worth it. If you can, finish out the year and then start looking for a better position. Try to network at district meetings, workshops, etc. to find which schools may be a better fit for you. Also, check nearby districts for their salary levels. While no one becomes a teacher for the money, you deserve to make a living wage so maybe consider making a move. Good luck!
     
  5. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Jan 20, 2008

    I'm sorry you're having a rough time right now. :(

    The first year teaching can be so hard. There are just so many things to do and think about, and they all have to be taken care of right this second. It seems impossible to handle discipline issues when the admin won't back you up. And worst of all, it always seems like just as soon as you get your footing, someone comes along and snatches the rug out from under you.

    First year teachers who have good experiences usually have lots and lots of support in their building and in their district. I think maybe you just got stuck in one of those buildings or districts that isn't very good about giving support to new teachers. I recommend that you consider moving to a different school, or perhaps even a completely different district or state.

    If you think there is any chance that you will continue to teach, I highly recommend that you do not quit mid-year, even if it means suffering through these last few months. Quitting a teaching job mid-year is sort of like career suicide, and it's very difficult to overcome later on. Hey, the year is half over and you've made it this far. Everything is downhill from here.

    Good luck! :)
     
  6. Miss Beazly

    Miss Beazly Rookie

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    Jan 21, 2008

    Thank you all for your wonderful replies. Cassie you are right, quitting mid-year is a very bad idea and I won't do that. I have considered even fantasized, about moving to another location, but my kids are here and I don't really know if I could do it.
    At any rate I appreciate you all taking the time to reply to my post. Your ideas have been most helpful.
     
  7. Budaka

    Budaka Cohort

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    Jan 21, 2008

    I have taught in big schools and I have taught in little schools. They both have their pluses and negatives. I love the school I am at right now, but I think my schedule would have killed me if I had been a first year teacher. At little schools you are expected to do so much and teach so many different subjects. None of the other teachers are very sympathetic because they are all in the same boat!
    You will have different issues at a larger school, but you will probably have less subjects to teach. I spend hours every week just doing the lesson plans for the five subjects I teach. That doesn't include copying or writing worksheets/tests that is just writing out my lesson plans! It was a lot easier when I just taught one or two subjects. But I did have a lot more papers to grade.
     
  8. Emily Bronte

    Emily Bronte Groupie

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    Jan 21, 2008

    I thought about quitting my first year. I knew I was going to stick it out until the end of the year. I ended up sticking it out two more years and I am now up for tenure in June. I do not and did not have the micro management issues that you have, I am glad I stayed because I know that being offered tenure will help me in my future teaching position searches. As we move toward spring and the summer break, the hard times are a little easier to bear.
     
  9. ALOVEFORTEACHIN

    ALOVEFORTEACHIN Rookie

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    Jan 21, 2008

    I am also a first year teacher and could have entitled my post the same, I hate my job. I am teaching High School when i know I should be teaching elementary. Is it really faster the 2nd half of the year, is it really downhill or is that just something that those of you with experience say to make us newbies feel better?
     
  10. frogger

    frogger Devotee

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    Feb 3, 2008

    I am a first year teacher and this is my 2nd career - I have gone through a lot of what you said as well. I wouldn't quit mid- year you will have to repeat your 1st year someplace else. Stick it out and just start looking for a new district asap. I moved to a new state to get a teaching job plus being by myself so the added stress of working in a school district where there is lack of leadership, discipline, behavior problems and co-workers who thrive on causing drama is added stress for any teacher much less a new one. But I enjoy teaching and am able to move around easily in the state I moved to - teachers do it all the time here. I am already looking into other districts and putting feelers out...that's how I am getting through it all until June 6th! :)
     
  11. Miss Beazly

    Miss Beazly Rookie

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    Sep 6, 2009

    I hope you will indulge me in my rant. I came on to find this thread I started nearly two years ago. I was a first year teacher and hated my job. I finished out that year and did a second. I am now starting my third year at the same school, and I still hate it.
    All the problems that I wrote about before are still problems today. Add to this that the principal seems to have lost her mind. I will spare you the gory details, but would appreciate feedback.
    Several of you advised me wisely to at least finish that first year, which of course I did. Now I need to know what damage I might due to my career if I leave at the beginning of the school year....assuming that is that I ever even want to teach again. :help:
     
  12. Budaka

    Budaka Cohort

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    Sep 6, 2009

    I will make the comment I made earlier. Have you thought about a different school? Every school is different!
     
  13. Miss Beazly

    Miss Beazly Rookie

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    Sep 6, 2009

    Yes I have. Of course.
     
  14. swansong1

    swansong1 Virtuoso

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    Sep 6, 2009

    May I ask if you hunted for a new job? I'm guessing you did and couldn't find one and that's why you are back in a situation you dislike so badly?
     
  15. futureteach21

    futureteach21 Habitué

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    My question: Do you hate teaching or do you hate your school? That should determine whether you quit or not. If you hate teaching, then you shouldn't be a classroom. But if it is just the school, then maybe you can transfer to a different building?
     
  16. Rebel1

    Rebel1 Connoisseur

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    Sep 6, 2009

    Sorry to read this about your job.
    You sound like you can use a change of atmosphere!:D
    We can't convince you to stay in teaching IF YOU HATE IT. Like FutureT21 mentioned, a different school might be good 4 u, IF you hate the school you're in & not TEACHING.
    Good luck with your decision,

    Rebel1
     
  17. Miss Beazly

    Miss Beazly Rookie

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    Sep 7, 2009

    Well that is a question I don't have the answer to. This is my first teaching job and it's been bad from the first day. I know I don't like the school, but I don't know whether or not it's teaching I hate. I wish I did know. That could help in my decision.
    To becksuek: yes, I have looked for another job. Had a couple of interviews, but obviously didn't get hired. I applied to a neighboring district which seems impossible to get a job in. You cannot contact the schools or principals directly. The procedure is that you turn your application into the district office and they contact the principals when a position is open that you qualify for.
    So, what I'm wondering mostly is whether or not leaving at the beginning of the year-my third year- will be detrimental to future employment.
     
  18. rachaelski

    rachaelski Habitué

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    Sep 7, 2009

    Miss Beazly, I can understand your frustrations. After an amazing first two years of teaching, I came to a school that resulted in me hating school, teaching, and life in general. I wasn't sure teaching was what I wanted. I moved to another school, and I am actually slightly sad that I am not at school with my kids today. I hope you figure out whether it's the school or the job. Teaching is hard, and it's not for everyone. Good luck.
     
  19. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Sep 7, 2009

    To answer your question:

    I think it depends on your contract and the laws in the state in which you reside.

    But I'm guessing that, in a market where teachers are crying for jobs, it won't help your professional reputation. Even if you're not officially prevented from taking another public school job, your actions may haunt you in terms of what your current employer says at reference time.

    Of course, it's up to you to decide whether or not that's worth keeping the job for until spring.

    Good luck, whatever you decide.

    ETA: this article highlights some ideas on the topic:

    http://www.ia-sb.org/assets/5917AB5B-14B4-43EE-9117-D578AC32B306.pdf
     
  20. MissCeliaB

    MissCeliaB Aficionado

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    Sep 7, 2009

    i think it would depend on how you left. Is there a way to take a sabbatical or personal leave of some kind? There were a few teachers at my old school who found jobs after leaving other jobs in the middle of the year, but they had personal reasons for leaving.
     
  21. futureteach21

    futureteach21 Habitué

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    Sep 7, 2009

    I think you are going to have to decide if possibly liking teaching is worth staying in a situation you hate. Leaving in the middle of the year is bound to raise some questions if you ever apply at any other schools, but if you don't want to teach then I think its up to you.

    I think you can take leaves of absence, but sabbaticals you have to apply for and get approved. My district would not approve one during the middle of the year. You could talk to an HR rep for your district or your P if this is the route you want to go.
     
  22. COMrs.S

    COMrs.S Rookie

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    Sep 7, 2009

    Miss Beazly,

    How do you feel when you are in the classroom with the kids? Forget about all of the BS that happens when it's not just you and the kids and then ask yourself,"Do I enjoy doing this?"

    I had a terrible first year last year. The cattiness, the micro-managing, gossiping, etc. After Winter break, I wanted to leave and find a new school. But then I realized that the only thing that truly mattered to me was that I could be the best I can be for my students. After that, everyday has been amazing! I'm there again this year. The same BS goes on with staff(it's getting better though), but I'm there for the children. Think about it next time you are in the classroom. Can you hang in there until May/June knowing that all that matters is that your students depend on you? Sometimes, that thought alone is what will keep you going. :)
     
  23. amaryllis

    amaryllis Rookie

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    Sep 8, 2009

    Maybe it's the type of school? If it's not the grade level. You mentioned the principal was crazy and the school is micro-managed. I don't know what type of school it is: large, small, urban, rural, public, private, etc...

    There are small charter schools cropping up everywhere and continuation schools for high school that are very one-on-one.

    I wonder if you could observe in some other school's classes, you could possibly make up some excuse as to why, and check out what it seems like at different types of schools.

    Renting a room has got to be frustrating. Can you go up to at least a studio of your own? They're about the same where I live as a room rental :/

    Can you think of other jobs in education, like administration or counseling or even school library (where there are online programs) that might be better for you?
     
  24. BioAngel

    BioAngel Science Teacher - Grades 3-6

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    Sep 9, 2009

    Just wanted to share...

    I always thought I'd be a high school biology teacher and I went to college in order to become just that.

    My first student teaching placement was in a great school in NY, teaching 7th grade. I loved the kids, the curriculum, the technology, the faculty, and I was nearly in tears while I was leaving on my last day. I was shocked that I would love working with younger kids so much, but I also realized that I was in a very supportive and caring school.

    My second student teaching placement was in high school, teaching various courses in grades 9 thru 12. I loved the faculty and one section of students--- but I hated the curriculum, I hated how things were taught, and I couldn't stand how most of the students cared nothing about getting an education. I was in tears through out the whole 8 weeks I was there--- I would park in the parking lot in the morning and just would cry! Here I thought that this was my dream: high school biology and I was HATING it.

    Now for my first *real* teaching job: I'm teaching 5th grade science (yay for younger kids), using an inquiry-based curriculum (very hands on and centered on the students, not the teacher... YAY again), and I also work with an amazing group of kind and dedicated faculty (I have the 4th grade science teacher next door to help me, plus my second year mentor (who's also a science teacher) to plan lessons and vent to, PLUS my science dept supervisor who I lesson plan with once a cycle and meet with as a dept twice a cycle-- cycle being 10 days). I love the kids, they REALLY want to learn, and the parents are so helpful. I am in HEAVEN! :)

    What I am saying is that every teacher will have good experiences and bad. Sadly, I think you're stuck in a bad situation and since this is your FIRST and ONLY experience, you might not know any better/ aka you don't know what's out there for you as a teacher.

    Now I know getting a teaching position isn't the easiest thing out there, but I would try to talk to your faculty or here online about each specific thing that is causing you to hate what you're doing. There are ways of coping with the bad parts of teaching--- and I think that's something that is important for us teachers to learn: certain parts that aren't so fun about teaching will be with us no matter where we teach. I found that when I did have a "blah" part that if I talked to a fellow faculty member (or online here) and got some suggestions on how to handle the problem, I felt better, I overcame it, and I moved on.
     
  25. Budaka

    Budaka Cohort

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    Sep 10, 2009

    Well said BioAngel! There is such a variety out there. Even teaching the same subject, same grade level but at a different school can be a whole different experience.
     
  26. hopefulnovice

    hopefulnovice Rookie

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    Sep 10, 2009

    I am sooooo happy...at last! :):):)

    Hello all,

    I wrote in here last school year, starting in December. Those of you who read my posts may remember my tearful rambling tirades. Teaching for the school I was at last year made me one of the most miserable people on this planet. I was hopeless, crying, blaming myself, loosing self-respect and self-worth...

    Oh my Lord, what a turn-around it has been for me people! I was laid off in July (thank God for that!) and found a different teaching position in August. It is my third week at a small charter school, teaching a different subject (ESL). Oh boy, I am in heaven these days. The school is truly a "family", everyone is trying to help and encourage. The principle is a great guy, and the kids...well, the kids LOVE being in school. I kid you not! Such a scenario can exist. Most of the kids at my school are recent immigrants from poor families who see school as "the window to the world". They want to be here, they want to learn, you don't have to "earn" their respect, they already respect you, because that's what they are taught in their families: respect your elders and especially your teachers. I don't have to worry about the discipline or the curriculum (it's all mapped out for us, and there is a lot of resources and help from colleagues and administration), all I focus on now is "how do I teach the kids to the best of my ability?"

    New teachers, do not despair. It's not you, it's the school you are at. If you are miserable, it's the fault of your administrators. You can and you will find "your" school where you will be happy. Trust me, if I can do it, you can do it, just find and read my previous suicidal posts.

    Good luck!
     
  27. Miss Beazly

    Miss Beazly Rookie

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    Sep 10, 2009

    Thank you for all the great responses. I have determined from reading and considering the personal experiences and good advice that so many of you have shared, that the problem is indeed the school. There are a number of factors at play that all contribute to a very dysfunctional atmosphere. I don't see that changing anytime soon, so I am looking for another job. If I end up leaving before the school year is done...or tomorrow, I hope down the road I can find another teaching position. It's bad enough here that I am willing to take that chance.
    I would love to lay out the details as I'm sure with the collective wisdom you could all help me; however, I'm worried that a fellow teacher or my principal might read here and would recognize the situation. I already feel like I'm walking on eggshells.
     
  28. beyondburned

    beyondburned New Member

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    Nov 16, 2009

    Get out now is my advice for you. Teaching is a tough, thankless job that will keep you in the poor house. I am in my 20th year and I so badly wish I had left the profession after the first year. Teaching is a joke, and the WORST thing that ever happened to public education is inclusion. If I had to do it all over again, I would avoid public schools like the plague and never send my kids to a public school either. Too many severe problem children, not enough support, screwed up parents and constant battles just to try to impart some knowledge to some students? GET OUT! RUN!!
     
  29. swansong1

    swansong1 Virtuoso

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    Nov 16, 2009

    [
    QUOTE=beyondburned;1120211]Get out now is my advice for you. Teaching is a tough, thankless job that will keep you in the poor house. I am in my 20th year and I so badly wish I had left the profession after the first year. Teaching is a joke, and the WORST thing that ever happened to public education is inclusion. If I had to do it all over again, I would avoid public schools like the plague and never send my kids to a public school either. Too many severe problem children, not enough support, screwed up parents and constant battles just to try to impart some knowledge to some students? GET OUT! RUN!![/QUOTE]

    Just curious...if you hate the career so much, why have you remained in it for 20+ years?
     
  30. round stanley

    round stanley Companion

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    Nov 16, 2009

    get a cubicle job

    For all of you who hate teaching...just leave. Find a nice 9-5 paper sorting job and let someone else try to encourage our children to excel.
     
  31. Miss Beazly

    Miss Beazly Rookie

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    Nov 18, 2009

    I appreciate your honesty and agree with much of what you have said.
     
  32. looneyteachr

    looneyteachr Companion

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    Nov 29, 2009

    6 preps is not the usual - most teachers complain if they have 3 preps - you are a saint!
     
  33. lcs067

    lcs067 New Member

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    Mar 28, 2010

    I'm having a similar experience

    I, too, am a first-year teacher and hate my job. I have been in this slump psychologically for awhile, and I can't seem to shake it.

    I, too, went into teaching as a second career full of hopes of aspirations that have been squelched. I worked so hard to become a teacher and now am so depressed I can barely get out of bed in the morning. My family is having a hard time living with me - I'm having a hard time living with me- because I'm so full of anger over the situation that I'm in.

    There are all kinds of problems with my position. I took over the position mid semester, and never got the chance to sufficiently prepare my curriculum or establish my own disciplinary procedures/classroom environment.

    I was given responsiblity for teaching advanced placement classes with no AP training and have taken flak from all sides -parents, students, and administration, for the coursework not being up to snuff. I think it's amazing that I've taught myself as much as I have about advanced placement strategies and instruction and have been able to implement those in the classroom, but of course, I have received no acknowledgement for that.

    Administration, while being basically supportive, is now allowing me to take the fall for everything and procedures that have not been properly communicated to me to begin with.

    I have fallen behind in my planning and grading, and instead of being given the emotional support and boost I need to feel motivated to create meaningful interesting content for the rest of the semester, I was instead given a warning the day before spring break expressing "concerns" about my performance.

    I have never worked harder or given more to a job in my life, for so little reward. I'm working 70-hour weeks and have pushed myself beyond the point of physical and emotional breakdown. With budget cuts being what there are, there are no other teaching opportunities in my metro area.

    What started as such an opportunity has become such a burden. How do I make this feel like an opportunity for me again and get through this year successfully?
     
    Last edited: Mar 28, 2010
  34. lcs067

    lcs067 New Member

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    Mar 28, 2010

    thank you

    thank you for the supportive words - I need it - I feel very alone in this experience
     
  35. Budaka

    Budaka Cohort

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    Mar 28, 2010

    What AP subject is it? AP is hard to teach very had. And as wonderful as AP students and their parents can be, they also can have a very high opinion of themselves!! Just remember no matter what they say you are the expert, you have the college degree, you have the experience. I learned this attitude from a teacher who I always thought was a bit arrogant. He said that you have maintain a certain confidence in yourself. It is easy for smart kids to try to intimate you. But just remember you are the teacher. And they are the students. You have a wealth of knowledge that they don't have. It doesn't mean that you are better than them or that they don't have something to teach you. But you are the expert in the classroom.
    Second, how are you teaching your class? Your students should always be working hard than you! Easier said than done, I know. But my favorite quote:

    It is not my job to work myself to death while my students watch.
    It is my job to work my students to death while I watch!
     
  36. lcs067

    lcs067 New Member

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    Mar 28, 2010

    Thank you. My mentor teacher has said the exact same thing to me. I am definitely not projecting that type of confidence in the classroom (I know that I need to), partly because I am so painfully aware of how much I have to learn.

    My subject area is language arts, and I teach junior and seniors. And I am definitely at this point working far harder than they are.

    Thank you for the support and advice! It means so much to me at a time when I am struggling so much. I like your quote - it made me laugh:)
     
  37. Budaka

    Budaka Cohort

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    Mar 28, 2010

    Ah, English. I teach English and Spanish and English is far worse because everyone feels that they know something about English. It is hard for non-Spanish speaking parents to criticize the way I teach Spanish! This summer you should check into a national writing project class at an area college. Usually the class is free graduate credits and you will get a stipend to take it! It certainly changed the way I teach writing completely! I looked at the National Writing Project website and there are three sites in Colorado. At the least their site has many interesting lesson plan ideas. Also, if you haven't looked at it before try readwritethink. Some of it is geared for younger students but there is stuff for older students also.
    At the AP junior/senior level I wouldn't think that you would have tons of daily assignments. Think bigger, longer lasting projects. And by no means to you need to grade everything! Good luck! If you have a particular unit you need help on feel free to ask me.
     
  38. TamiJ

    TamiJ Virtuoso

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    Mar 29, 2010

    I think a lot of the issues you are experiencing could be the school itself. I am in a small, private school where the admin is supportive, and parents really care about their child's education. Without those things, it can be tough, especially for a new teacher. My first experiences (subbing/tutoring/student teaching) were in tough schools and back then I questioned what I was getting into. I think you should just keep trying to make it through, and then later look for a different school until you find a fit.
     

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