I had an interview this past week. I think it went well.

Discussion in 'Job Seekers' started by bros, Mar 15, 2015.

  1. bros

    bros Phenom

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    Nah. If they're presented with two candidates, one who works in the district and they already know and another who they don't know. They'll always pick the person they know over some random interviewee.

    One of their teachers is retiring at the end of the year - so i'll be keeping an eye on their site to apply for that teacher's position. Hopefully another one of their teacher's aides doesn't want the job.
     
  2. kcjo13

    kcjo13 Phenom

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    No, they won't. They will pick the best candidate for the job. There are plenty of posts here about people who didn't get selected for an internal job. Why do you always insist you know more than other more experienced teachers here?



    If you are the right person for the job, you will get your chance. I wonder if sending that thank you note that you insisted wouldn't make a difference would, in fact, have made a difference? :whistle:
     
  3. mathmagic

    mathmagic Enthusiast

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    That's definitely not true. I'm your case-in-point. :)

    As someone else said, think positively about getting the interview, and approach this as an opportunity to continue to find ways to improve your skills - both as an educator and in regards to your interviewing skills.
     
  4. TeacherNY

    TeacherNY Phenom

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    We have at least 2 TAs in each classroom in my school so we have a lot of them. Many actually have Teacher certifications. When there's a teaching position open they DO hire some TAs who apply but I myself was hired over a TA and also the teacher across the hall from me. Even though at least 5 TAs who already worked at the school applied for the jobs at the time, they chose outside candidates. It could really go either way depending on who the other candidates are. You never know.
     
  5. swansong1

    swansong1 Virtuoso

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    I think that most districts still hire who they think is the best candidate. Especially in a tested subject.
     
  6. teacherintexas

    teacherintexas Maven

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    I call bull on this one.

    They didn't call you to the next round of demo lessons because a TA applied. What?????

    Um. No.
     
  7. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Bros. Making excuses might be a defense mechanism and temporarily make you feel better but you need to be realistic. You have no experience outside of an unconventional ST experience. You need to work on your presentation and 'package' in order to be a more compelling candidate. What steps will you take to be that one that makes a school say 'this is the one'?
     
  8. yellowdaisies

    yellowdaisies Fanatic

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    Though I agree that working as a TA in a district may give an advantage, that does NOT mean they wouldn't hire someone else if they found a more compelling candidate.

    Here's another way of looking at it - what if YOU were the aide?? You've seen that working as a TA helps other people get jobs, so that might be a great way for you to get a foot in the door. That experience could also really beef up your resume and make you more desirable to a school or district.
     
  9. bros

    bros Phenom

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    Because that is what places that are legally required to post jobs do - if they have someone internal (or related to a staff member) in mind, they get the job most of the time. It's happened with pretty much every teaching position I have interviewed for. They either hired someone from within the district or hired a relative of a current/former teacher.

    I did send them the thank you note and it did nothing, so yeah.

    Got a letter from the school today informing me that another candidate was chosen for the position and that I was an excellent and compelling candidate, blah blah blah.

    Yeah. That's how it works. If someone internal applies to a position and they like and know the person, they get the job. It's done all the time in the public sector.

    It's not an excuse. It is a fact.

    There is nothing I can do to bolster my resume. No schools call me back despite filling out substitute applications on their sites, most don't even have postings for substitute teachers (and haven't for months).

    I can't work part time, otherwise I lose my health insurance (and my SSI and Medicaid).

    I have been applying to TA positions. I was interviewed for one in November, it was given to a recently retired teacher from that district. I interviewed for one in January, they never called me back despite the guy interviewing me seemingly loving everything about me and my resume. I was supposed to interview for another one in January, but then it turned out it was an anticipated position, and the child's home district hadn't approved the child's attendance at the school or funding for a para yet. So they cancelled that interview without even calling me - I had to call them multiple times to asking when it was rescheduled to (it was originally cancelled due to snow), then they eventually called me back and told me that approval hadn't been granted, and the position was not available.

    February, had no interviews, there weren't even any jobs posted that I could apply for (none were within a 2 hour one-way commute or I did not qualify for the position or they were no-benefits positions).

    Had three interviews in March, two phone interviews from two education companies, none got back to me, so I am guessing I am not getting those. And the other was this school I interviewed at. Applied for another job, principal emailed me over the weekend and said he would be reviewing resumes over the weekend, then sometimes this week they would contact candidates they wish to interview.
     
  10. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Clearly you are disappointed from this recent rejection. Understandable, but it's affecting your outlook.

    It seems you little regard for what the veteran teachers here who have served on hiring committees (or administrators) know is true. In districts that have a 'guaranteed' candidate, they may be required to POST THE POSITION, but they generally are not required to INTERVIEW other candidates. Even if they HAD TO interview outside candidates, they wouldn't interview as many as 9...school staff just don't have that time to waste. They want to find a good fit, make a decision and get back to business.

    And yes, inside candidates have an 'in'...mostly because they have experience in the school where they are interviewing, have established themselves as reliable and capable, and are seen as a good fit because of that history and experience. As many have said before, it's a competitive market so each applicant has to do all they can to stand out and be compelling. Without getting some experience, bros, it's just going to get tougher as time goes by. It's evident your resume is good enough to get interviews but you're soon going to have run the gamut in terms of the limited number of districts to which you apply and you will continually be up against other recent grads who are out there already getting subbing or other experiences. Schools generally don't continue to interview candidates time and time again once they've been passed over. If you're going to stick with your plan of only applying to a few districts, you've got to do something different to stand out and do it soon. You need to be able to overcome objections and questions lingering in interviewers' minds (but might remain unasked) Experience is the best route to become more competitive and hone your skills but it seems you have reasons why that isn't panning out for you.
     
  11. vateacher757

    vateacher757 Cohort

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    Wow such negativity....I always say "positive in postive out" perhaps on interviews your negativty is coming through and it is hurting your chances.
     
  12. a2z

    a2z Maven

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    I will say two things. I don't want a reply about either.

    First, because you missed the initial timeframe to send a thank you note that may have had some impact on the position you were interviewing for, the thank you note serves to help any future interviews you may have at the school. You have no idea if it will help, but some chance of it making an impact for the future is better than no chance at all.

    Second, the only way you can get something to bolster your resume if you can't at the present time get a sub position or another position is to volunteer in some capacity that has interaction with people. I don't want to hear excuses why you can't. Call the CP advocacy group in your area. See if there is anything you can do at meetings if there are any close. See if there is a Literacy New Jersey office close by and see about becoming an adult literacy tutor. In my area the Literacy Council is good about matching tutors up with someone close so that transportation issues are minimized for both the tutor and student. Anything that shows you are doing something would be helpful for your resume.

    Please. Do not reply to this bros. I don't want to hear the I can't reasons even if that would be your response.
     
  13. bros

    bros Phenom

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    There is literally no physical way for me to apply for districts outside of the area I can apply in.

    Do you expect me to spend $30,000 a year on taxis?

    Should I do a 4 hour one-way commute by public transit for a distance that would take 35-40 minutes by car?

    What do you expect me to do?

    I cannot move out of my house.

    I will not be able to for the foreseeable future.

    I've applied to over 100 teacher/teacher assistant positions in the past 12 months.

    I've had six interviews.

    I apply to whatever districts are directly accessible via public transit (Within a 1.5 hour one way commute) and not an urban school/Abbott district.

    I am not a mindreader - if an interviewer has a question or lingering doubt - they should ask me. I can't read their mind to figure out what they are thinking.

    No, if anything, I am somewhat monotone during interviews. As previously explained, I tend to not display much emotion, with occasional gesticulating due to anxiety.

    I am only negative on here to people who are negative towards me.

    Nah. I'm going to reply. You can't post something and not expect a reply.

    I sent the thank you note the weekend after the interview, which is well within a good timeframe.

    The closest Cerebral Palsy Advocacy place is the UCP of Hudson county, NJ. It would be around 2 1/2 hours one way by train to get there. A 5 hour total commute is not tolerable, especially for something like a volunteer position. There are no UCP affiliates in my area of NJ.

    Cerebral Palsy association of NJ has no locations anywhere near me (Closest would be Ewing, right outside of Trenton, which would be about a 2.5-2.75 hour one-way trip by multiple trains.

    I can't volunteer as an advocate for the Epilepsy Foundation of New Jersey - as it is political advocacy. Due to my mom's job, no family members that she lives with are allowed to participate in any form of political advocacy, even going to a township committee meeting.

    Their closest office to me is 3.5 hours by public transit (38 minutes/35 miles by car) and they require all volunteers to have drivers licenses/be able to operate a motor vehicle.

    I've also been looking at a variety of AmeriCorps/National Service Volunteer opportunities - they are things I cannot do. Most of them are rebuilding projects which require one to use hand tools.

    Looking up Literacy New Jersey, none of their offices or training are within a reasonable distance of me. One of their affiliates is, but they have finished their current set of training seminars for new tutors, no indication as to when they will start up again. I'll keep on eye on them & check the Americorps site again.
     
  14. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Might it be time to consider a different job within the world of education?
     
  15. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    :thumb:
     
  16. bros

    bros Phenom

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    I'm applying to both teaching and teacher assistant/para positions in an attempt to get a job.

    Eventually, I think my... knowledge of special education would be useful in a LDT-C role, but that requires 3 years of teaching experience before you can enter a LDT-C program/get the certification from the state.
     
  17. kcjo13

    kcjo13 Phenom

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    You do realize that the competitiveness of each of those positions is going to be nearly the same, right?

    Good luck, bros.
     
  18. bros

    bros Phenom

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    Eh. At some of the places i've applied to for para/teachers assistant, they're like "I see you are certified. You do know that this isn't a full time teaching position, right? It's a paraprofessional job."

    Apparently some certified teachers don't like to take para/TA positions for some reason.

    But the only people I graduated with that I know got jobs only got them through nepotism - the rest are unemployed or doing things like AmeriCorps after a year of being unable to find work.
     
  19. swansong1

    swansong1 Virtuoso

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    Bros, what is holding you up from volunteering in a local school...perhaps one of those schools that you have been applying to?
     
  20. Tutor

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    I visit these boards infrequently but everytime it seems like there is a post from this "bros" person making excuses! Bros, forgive my lack of tact, you aren't going to get a teaching job. The world of education is VERY competitive and they want qualified candidates who are committed to the field of education, who are fit and able to do everything asked of them without complaint or excuses. Employers want employees who are able to get to work and do the job. It doesn't matter what your disability is, you have to be able to get there and do the job. Honestly, from what I have read from you here, I wouldn't want you teaching my children or as a colleague. We teach empowerment and self-determination not excuses.
     
  21. teacherintexas

    teacherintexas Maven

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    Bros, you sent a thank you note past the time they said they were going to be calling people in for demos. You cannot, with any integrity, tell me that is an acceptable time frame. That is like campaigning the day after the election.
     
  22. justwanttoteach

    justwanttoteach Cohort

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    The closest Cerebral Palsy Advocacy place is the UCP of Hudson county, NJ. It would be around 2 1/2 hours one way by train to get there. A 5 hour total commute is not tolerable, especially for something like a volunteer position. There are no UCP affiliates in my area of NJ.

    Cerebral Palsy association of NJ has no locations anywhere near me (Closest would be Ewing, right outside of Trenton, which would be about a 2.5-2.75 hour one-way trip by multiple trains.

    I can't volunteer as an advocate for the Epilepsy Foundation of New Jersey - as it is political advocacy. Due to my mom's job, no family members that she lives with are allowed to participate in any form of political advocacy, even going to a township committee meeting.

    I am curious as to what Your mom does and how her employer is able to so easily violate yours and others first amendment rights. You can volunteer wherever you want thanks to the constitution.

    Their closest office to me is 3.5 hours by public transit (38 minutes/35 miles by car) and they require all volunteers to have drivers licenses/be able to operate a motor vehicle.

    I live in California, and I'm certain the systems are different yet similar in every state. Have you looked into regional centers or department of rehabilitation?

    In California these organizations are set up to provide people with disabilities training, transportation, and any additional assistance they might need and qualify for. Judging from what I have read transportation seems to be an issue...I would look into that as it might open up more possibilities.


    I've also been looking at a variety of AmeriCorps/National Service Volunteer opportunities - they are things I cannot do. Most of them are rebuilding projects which require one to use hand tools.

    You are protected by the Americans with Disabilities Act and the Latternman Act. If there is reasonable accommodations that can be made by law employers, organizations etc are required to do so.

    Bros, I have read all the posts in this thread and I see many times the word can't used by you. This hurts my heart. I am a member of the disabled population, and an advocate. I firmly be liv that using this word when referencing your own abilities literally shoots yourself in the foot. If you present yourself as not being able why should others think differently? I have 27years experience living with seizures and epilepsy. I am the only member in my family with a disability. I am also the only family member to have gone to college, have a bachelors, and a masters degree, and two teaching credentials. I was told a lot that I couldn't do things growing up. At times I believed these hurtful lies, and considered giving up. I know first hand what it feels like to be born with or given something you hate and can't control. Believe me I get it. However, I also know that the only person who decides what I can and can't do is me! You have CP, you have epilepsy...but you also have a gift and an education, and know how hard you can and have worked. You know better then most what it feels like to struggle in a world that is uneducated about your conditions. WE can relate to people with disabilities better then someone without. We understand their struggles and have lived it. These are the things that should keep you going. There is no better satisfaction then proving the nay Sayers wrong...your attitude about yourself projects. If you feel negative and frustrated with your situation it's going to show in your interviews. You can say all the great buzz words and catch phrases but if there isn't that fire and enthusiasm in your tone or shown on your face it just comes across as empty promises. Good luck in your future endeavors
    Jen
    Epileptic
    Specials education teacher
    Disability advocate
     
  23. MikeTeachesMath

    MikeTeachesMath Devotee

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    Bros, thank you letters are extremely important. Not only is the interview the first time they're meeting you (usually), it's the first time you're meeting them. A thank you letter shows that you are still interested in the position after having experienced a taste of the environment. Sure, a lack of a letter doesn't say the opposite, but sending one never hurts and it reinforces your desire for the position in the minds of the committee.
     
  24. bros

    bros Phenom

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    I suppose I could ask the Board of Ed member who lives on my street about volunteering in the district I live in (It would be the cheapest way for me to volunteer). They usually approve volunteers right before the new school year. Most of the volunteers (volunteers only need to be approved by the BoE if they volunteer over 5 school days in one school year) are former life skills graduates or parents of students.

    So what you are saying in your first bit is "Schools don't want to hire teachers with disabilities, no matter what they can bring to the table, because they are not 'fit'."

    Everyone complains about their jobs. Everyone. They might not vent it at their place of work, but everyone has something they don't like about their job - hell, my uncle enjoys his job, but hates the coffee machine they have in the office.

    My mom works for the town court as a deputy court administrator. As a deputy court administrator, she and any family members she lives with are prohibited from fraternizing with any township employees outside of the court, participating in politics (beyond voting), and other similar activities - we cannot participate in protests, either, or she could lose her job.

    I am a client of the NJ Department of Vocational Rehabilitation. Last time I talked to them after I graduated, I asked them what they could do to help me get a job - they said they could do nothing and told me to only call them again when I got a job, or if I needed anything like adaptive equipment that would enable me to perform a job that I got (which I don't need).

    I know I am able to do things, but a lot of the time, it feels like I can't or I shouldn't be able to - because why should a person like me get <job I applied for> - a normal person should get that job. I get down on myself frequently, most likely due to low self-esteem/low self concept due to bullying when I was a child due to my disabilities - and the parents of one of the children participating in and encouraging the bullying. Not pleasant memories, especially when one of the bullies was drafted by an NFL team and everyone in town was talking about it, even my parents were practically praising him right in front of my face. I don't think they remember how much those two kids did to me - just because I was not as strong as a nondisabled child - or maybe they don't realize the effect it still has on me today. My dad wonders where my anxiety comes from, he thinks it just popped up one day in high school, when i've had anxiety to some extent since probably 4th grade, with non-physical therapy related phobic tendencies starting in 6th grade (2001-2002 school year), when I began my social withdrawal, which probably grew (if that is the proper way to describe it) until I met my current therapist in 2010. I have improved drastically in the almost five years I have been seeing my therapist, but I still have anxiety, I still am uncomfortable in a large non-cohesive group like a family party, I probably always will be - i'm introverted. My anxiety has improved, it is still severe, but it has improved. By the end of college, I was somewhat comfortable talking to classmates in small groups (3-4 people including me). Which, compared to HS, was a massive improvement, where I would have pretty much everything short of a panic attack if my brother had to stay home sick from school. None of my teachers or my IEP case manager ever noticed my anxiety - or if they did, just said I never participated in classroom discussions. Though my IEP case manager thought I was cognitively impaired and had diabetes (neither are true).

    I know I know what it is like for people with disabilities who are struggling. I go into every interview with a positive attitude, although it might not show in my voice, as I have difficulty expressing mood with my voice.

    I don't really use a lot of buzzwords or catchphrases during my interviews - I try to answer in a formal manner that is somewhat conversational, which occasionally leads to tangents, which the interviewer(s) may ask me to expound upon later in the interview. Like at the last interview, they asked me a bit about what I know about special education law, they liked my answers about how I knew a lot regarding compliance regs and IEP law - I used some of the legal jargon, but I wouldn't call that using buzzwords, as jargon are a bit different from buzzwords.

    My facial expression during interviews feels like it is neutral, most of the time, with an occasional smile - usually when describing my student teaching or other experiences, or if they ask me about something I referenced earlier in the interview.

    I go into every interview with the mindset of "You're going to do great on the interview, don't stutter, and try to maintain eye contact as much as possible."

    Oh yeah, applied to two jobs today. One LTS through end of school year, one full time for next school year.
     
  25. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    The board of Ed approving volunteers is just a formality. Call the school directly and let them know you are available as a volunteer. Or contact your CTs from student teaching. Let them know you'd love to come in and help with any projects, reading with kids, whatever... You don't need to get the board member involved.
     
  26. comaba

    comaba Cohort

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    Does this Code of Conduct apply to your mom's position?

    http://www.judiciary.state.nj.us/rules/appemploy.htm#canon6

    If so, I don't see anything that prohibits family members from participating in political activities. The only canon that applies to family members is the one that prohibits financial gain due to affiliation with the court.
     
  27. olivecoffee

    olivecoffee Companion

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    Make a concerted effort during your interview to express emotions in your voice and your face. I think you've gotten many responses in this thread about the importance of showing the interviewers how much you *want* this job and how much *passion* you have for this career. Seriously, practice in front of a mirror. Giving all of the right answers is great, but it won't do much if the committee doesn't see your passion.

    Don't worry so much about stuttering. I stutter and I always told the people with whom I interviewed that it may come out. After they asked me to tell them a bit about myself, I'd end my answer with "Oh, and I want to let you know that I have a speech disorder where I'll sometimes stutter over plosive consonants.. so if I stutter, please bear with me!" I say it with a smile and I've always been met positively. Announcing it at the beginning of the interview makes me more at ease, so I stutter less.
     
  28. vateacher757

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    Another great tip along with the bolded is to also record it and play it back, listen to yourself.

    Tone is very important...you can say the same thing but with different tones and they come across totally different.
     
  29. bros

    bros Phenom

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    The official board policy is that anyone volunteering for more than five days in a calendar year is considered a "regular basis volunteer" and is required to undergo a criminal background check.

    She's under special regulations because her court has to have all appointments to it (aside from court administrators/deputy court administrator/clerks) approved by the Governor.

    I don't know how to express in my voice. During the interview at some point, to explain my hands moving around quite a bit, I will usually explain that I am disabled and have mild cerebral palsy. I won't inundate them with information on the rest of my disabilities, because that would just scare them away.

    Recording myself just makes me more nervous - mostly because whenever someone calls me to schedule an interview, they ask if I am home - most people assume I am a woman. One time, my credit union refused to talk to me on the phone because they thought I was "my daughter", "my girlfriend", or "my wife" (none of whom exist).
     
  30. a2z

    a2z Maven

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    Since it is a school board policy that volunteering for more than five days requires special procedures, the school will let you know. It isn't the big deal you are making of it unless you have something in a criminal background check to hide and then, you won't be getting a teaching job anyway. So, I don't see the problem bros. I see it as thinking it is a bigger deal than it is.

    The schools in my area have similar policies. People that will be volunteering more will be given a form at the local school to fill out. Once the check is done, they are given approval to start volunteering. Doesn't take too long. Worse case they make you go to the school district's administrative office building once. They may also make you get a TB test and show your immunizations are up-to-date or you are exempt for some reason, but none of this will be any different than if you are hired as a teacher or a para.

    You are making a mountain out of a mole hill.
     
  31. a2z

    a2z Maven

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    So you are going to avoid something that will eventually help you because people mistake your voice and someone wouldn't be convinced you are a man? You won't do something that, if you do it enough you will either learn to deal with your nervousness or get over it, because your voice isn't manly enough.


    Bros, I'm always thought of as a child on the phone too. Oh well. That is the way it goes. If a credit union did that to me, I would be writing a heck of a letter to the powers that be after getting the name of the person on the other end of the phone. Yes, a pain in the backside, but life doesn't stop because some people are idiots.
     
  32. vateacher757

    vateacher757 Cohort

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    :dizzy: Geez, we are all trying to offer tips that can help you present well in the interview and you have excuse after excuse so I don't know what more any of us can do to help but say good luck!

    Obviously you present well on paper because you are getting called in for interviews but something is going on in the interview that is keeping you from being selected and that is what you need to work on - your interviewing skills.

    When I was on the other side of the table I also looked at what my interviewee had on, was it presentable and professional?
     
  33. kcjo13

    kcjo13 Phenom

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    There are pages and pages and pages. This is not new. Don't ask about the suit.

    For me, personally, as a professional who has a LOT of experience interviewing candidates, I am tired of basically being told I can pack sand because I don't know what I'm talking about. That's what it amounts to. I recommend just ignoring.
     
  34. bros

    bros Phenom

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    Nah, no criminal background here. I'm no drug kingpin. I don't have any mob connections, unlike my grandparents (They went to a mafia wedding in the late 60s/early 70s, it's an entertaining story). They'll probably require a Mantoux test - haven't had one done in a few years, most places require one done within the previous six months to being hired (or right after being hired, since who wants to get injected with that painful stuff every six months on the dot?).

    Should I email the principal of the elementary school closest to me (Same principal as when I went there as a kid, she remembers me, at least last time I saw her like 8 years ago - one of my sixth grade teachers saw me in 2013 and recognized me the second she saw me. Apparently i'm very memorable.), the principal of the school where I student taught, the cooperating teacher at the school where I student taught, my old special education teacher, or the principal at my old special education teacher's school (As I did observations there in 2009 during that principal's first year)?

    I know what my voice sounds like. We have been working on it in therapy to make it so I am more expressive with my voice during interviews & in the classroom. My therapist says I am very expressive with my tone of voice during regular sessions with him, but I think that might be because I am incredibly comfortable there and I let myself "go", so to speak - I let my anxiety flow freely, which can result in me having very frenetic, broken up speech and heavy physical manifestations of my anxiety.

    I never claimed my interview skills were even average. I dress professionally for all of my interviews. I wear a dress shirt, dress pants, suit jacket, dress shoes, and a clip-on tie.

    Let's say it again:
    I dress professionally for all of my interviews. I wear a dress shirt, dress pants, suit jacket, dress shoes, and a clip-on tie.
     
  35. a2z

    a2z Maven

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    Truly, bros, where you volunteer is up to you. It could even be a local private school. It doesn't have to be the local public school.
     
  36. swansong1

    swansong1 Virtuoso

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    Why all the fuss about emailing this and that person about volunteering?! Go to the school and tell them you want to volunteer!!! Get the background check done if you have to. Good grief!!!

    I don't know why the heck we still respond on these threads...we are all such enablers... :beatdeadhorse: :beatdeadhorse: :beatdeadhorse: :banghead: :banghead: :banghead:
     
  37. vateacher757

    vateacher757 Cohort

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    It could be child care centers, rec centers anywhere with kids that you can work with.......I would call everyone in my area that I could get to reasonably and ask about volunteering.

    JMO
     
  38. olivecoffee

    olivecoffee Companion

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    This.

    Bros- after excuses and excuses, all I have left to say is: good luck on any future interviews and your job hunt. I hope you find a position that suits you, whether it's teaching or out of the classroom.
     
  39. bros

    bros Phenom

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    It would be the cheapest option and most likely to accept me - the private schools closest to me are parochial schools, and I am not religious.

    It's not like you can just walk into a school without a reason. Email would be better - at least to discuss my intent to volunteer.

    I've applied to all of the tutoring & child care centers in the area. The child care places don't want to hire me when they learn I have cerebral palsy (So far two have called me, say that one of the requirements of the position is to be able to lift 40-50 pounds, so I tell them that I have mild cerebral palsy and cannot lift things that heavy, so they say that they will go with another candidate and will call me if they have a position more suited to me in the future) and the tutoring places don't call me back when I submit my resume.

    I really like how you people think my explanations are excuses. I am simply trying to explain to you my situation and why I am unable to ever do certain things - no matter how much you people badger or harass me to do something. I will never apply to a job that would be over a 2 hour one-way commute, because that is an unacceptable commute to anyone.
     
  40. mathmagic

    mathmagic Enthusiast

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    Mar 25, 2015

    Food for thought:

    I gave my fourth graders, a while back, a passage from an emigrants guide (Oregon Trail) that was written way back when, where not only the language was used slightly differently, but more importantly, the level of the passage was for adults...I'm sure if it was leveled, it'd be a high school level at minimum.

    So, a fourth grade student of mine could give an explanation that there's no chance they could read that and get information from it, right? Nope. While I do have about 3-4 readers at an eighth or higher reading level, even my readers that read just at or below level were able to pull information from the text to help them understand the Oregon Trail and the emigrants' life a bit better.

    The moral of the story -- sure, there are often certain physical limitations. And certainly some mental limitations. But with the right attitude, and problem solving in regards to how to approach a difficult situation (i.e. grit), rather than spending the time on thinking about why something won't work or isn't going to work, or the limitations...with that right attitude, you accomplish so much more. As a teacher, I have to have that same thought process: I could focus on aspects of students' lives and say how that will never allow them to do this, or never become organized, etc...., or I can look at that same student and think: how can I utilize what I know about them in order to help them improve? How can I find a way to solve the problem, and not just chalk up certain parts to "just how things are"?

    /end ramble
     

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