I fail as a teacher?

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by OUOhYeah, Mar 12, 2016.

  1. OUOhYeah

    OUOhYeah Comrade

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    Mar 12, 2016

    I feel like I fail as a teacher. I am a first year teacher and I am the weak link at my school.... I have had several teachers yell at my students because m students are not listening to me, nor do they listen to anyone else for that matter. I follow through with behavior plans set out by myself and follow through.
     
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  3. Linguist92021

    Linguist92021 Phenom

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    Mar 12, 2016

    Most of the time the first year teacher is the weakest link at the school - obviously they have to figure things out and it's not easy. I'd say the other teachers are pretty weak for actually yelling at your kids, first of all, why are they yelling and second, why are they undermining your authority??
    So don't feel so bad. Keep doing what you're doing, stay consistent, follow through, and know that next year will be so much easier.
     
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  4. mrsammieb

    mrsammieb Devotee

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    Mar 12, 2016

    Hang in there! I have been teaching for quite a while and there are MANY times I feel overwhelmed and like I could do better. I am not the greatest at behavior management. I like to live in positive not the negative. Each year I try to pick one area to improve, like reading or math or book organization. If I try to tackle it all, it is too overwhelming. Hang in there!
     
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  5. OUOhYeah

    OUOhYeah Comrade

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    Mar 12, 2016

    I don't necessarily think that I am the weakest link though because we are not in a competition with one another. At least, I don't see if that way. I shouldn't have phrased my previous post like that. I'm also technically in my second year of teaching already.
     
  6. Linguist92021

    Linguist92021 Phenom

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    Mar 12, 2016

    What I meant was, that often 1st or even 2nd year teachers are obviously less experienced and usually not as good as teachers who have been teaching, and at the same school for 5 or more years. that's just how that is.
    Often new teachers are very enthusiastic, full of great ideas, new strategies, great with technology, etc and some veteran teacher are just stck in their old ways (most schools have at least 1 teacher like that). All these advantages the new teachers have are great, and yes, they're good teachers, but without classroom management skills it's hard to implement all those ideas. That comes in time.
    My point was to not be so hard on yourself.

    I had high expectations of my students from day one, but all they did was push back and hate me for it. Class management was hard, our students are very tough. I still have high expecttions of them, even higher, over time they got used to it, ost of them accepted it, a lot of them expect it and actually like it. I got a lot better with classroom management, and now I can actually teach and implement my ideas. But this is my 3rd year at this school. I was the weakest link at my school in the first year, but every new teacher we have (2 since I started) are struggling in their first year). Over time I improved and noticed the differences even semester to semester.
     
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  7. OUOhYeah

    OUOhYeah Comrade

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    Mar 12, 2016

    So what you're saying is it will get better next year?
     
  8. thesub

    thesub Comrade

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    Mar 12, 2016

    Please don't get disheartened. Like Linguist says, you just need more time. I am also very surprised that other teachers are yelling at your kids. If you follow thru on your behavior plans, the kids will eventually know you mean business. My only question is: do you have a rapport with the other teachers and a supportive P/admin?

    I am only a p/t aide but last year I was with a new teacher who was in her second year of teaching, This time I am with a teacher who has been at it 17 years. The newbie teacher always followed thru on her behavior plans and generally good evals from the P/ was well-liked by other staff members. Occasionally the senior teacher does comment that the newbie teacher should have pushed and expected more from her students.

    Just my two cents.
    thesub

     
  9. OUOhYeah

    OUOhYeah Comrade

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    Mar 12, 2016

    Could I get an example of someone's behavior plan? I have 5th grade, so it is quite hard. I don't call home unless I absolutely have to.
     
  10. runsw/scissors

    runsw/scissors Phenom

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    Mar 15, 2016

    I taught 5th grade for years. They can be a tough bunch at times. My first year I taught 5th grade and was ready to quit by the end of it. About this time during the school year I stumbled across Jim Fay's Teaching with Love & Logic. Here's what I learned:
    1. Make your expectations clear from the beginning, and keep it simple. My school had three big rules, and I had five basic rules that covered just about everything. The first day of school we went over these in detail. I had the students work in groups to make T charts listing what this looked/sounded like (and didn't), present to the class, practice a lot. They basically were setting their own standards though they didn't know it. At the end of the week we signed a class behavior contract. And I posted it. The trick is that you have to be consistent in enforcing it.

    2. If there is a problem, give the students a chance to fix it first. I would let them know there had been a problem, what it was, and ask them "Can you fix this on your own, or do I need to get parents involved?" Nine times out of ten they took care of it themselves. If it didn't get fixed or kept recurring, parents got phone calls and/or emails. *Examples included excessive talking in class, missing work, Kleenex walks, tattling or trying to get others in trouble. More extreme stuff didn't warrant this step.

    3. Give them choices you can live with. I was amazed what a huge difference this made. Everyone likes to feel a sense of control in their life. Giving them a bit of control (no matter how insignificant) is a big boon. Make sure the choices you give are ones you can live with. Fay says to give choices when outcomes will make you happy no matter what. Do you want to do even or odd problems? Do you want to start on the front or back of the paper? Do you want to do science in the morning today or after lunch? (this would be a class vote.) Do you want to read historical fiction this month or a biography? As long as YOUR goals are met (they practiced the concept, read the genres needed, covered both classes, etc.) the ultimate outcome is what you want. * You can't do this for everything or even everyday, but I tried to do something like this a few times a week. It would be a surprise to them, but they loved it. You can also pull it out as a behavior management technique with some kids. "I need you to sit away from Johnny at lunch. Here is why. Would you rather sit next to Frank at table one or Jayda at table three?"

    4. Don't treat every situation as the same thing. It might not be. Tommy might be chronic about not getting work done, and his consequence is sitting by the wall and doing it during recess because he just keeps losing it. Tanya, on the other hand, has recently started not having her work done either. In the past she has always been on top of this. I'd pull her aside and try to find out what is going on and help her form a plan before making her sit at recess. Maybe her dog died, or her sister is in the hospital, or some other new stressor has entered her life, but maybe with some help she can get herself back on track. This is one time I would call the parents after creating a plan with the child so they can support the child at home.

    The good news is that it does get better. Next year will likely be much better simply because of all the experience you are gaining this year. You will know infinitely more next August than you knew last August. Hang in there, trust yourself, seek help from others, and know it will be OK.
     
  11. futureteacher13

    futureteacher13 Rookie

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    Mar 15, 2016

    I <3 this! As a future elementary school teacher who wants to teach 5th grade students, I have learned so much from this and I will use these tips and strategies in my classroom one day! :)
     
  12. mrsammieb

    mrsammieb Devotee

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    Mar 21, 2016

    I love Teaching with Love and Logic... I need to read that again.
     

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