I chose a different career and I regret it but I don't know what to do now

Discussion in 'Secondary Education' started by TAPenrod87, Jun 7, 2017.

  1. TAPenrod87

    TAPenrod87 Rookie

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    Jun 7, 2017

    Hey everyone,
    I was accepted into a masters of education program in Detroit, MI. I was eventually talked out of it because everyone thought I was nuts for doing it. I wanted to teach high school and people were telling me how I won't get paid, I'm going to get roughed up, won't be able to find a job, etc.

    At the time, I was working as a tutor in Flint, MI and I really enjoyed it. I worked in a bad part of Flint and never got roughed up but I felt like they made good points so I declined my acceptance. I eventually was accepted into physical therapy school.

    Big thumbs up from everyone but I am miserable. I hate every moment of being in PT school. I can't even definitively say that I enjoy the job itself. I'm seriously considering dropping out.

    I like the idea of teaching and I really did enjoy tutoring. I was tutoring young adults who wanted to receive their GED. I felt fulfilled, creative, and challenged. I'm thinking of going back to it over the summer.

    Is it true that work is hard to come by? I know pay isn't great and I have so many student loans but do you make a decent living? Anything I look up online is negative. I don't know if going back to get my masters in education is the right choice either.

    I appreciate any advice you may have.

    Thank you
     
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  3. teacherintexas

    teacherintexas Maven

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    Jun 7, 2017

    I wouldn't worry about the negative stuff you read about online. I only write negative reviews for Sonic when it takes thirty minutes to get one drink. I don't go on the site when I get it in five.

    If you think you'd enjoy being a teacher, then become one. If you are wish-washy about your choice, then I would stay in your current course. You have to want to do this job to enjoy your career.
     
    Last edited: Jun 7, 2017
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  4. Jerry Dill

    Jerry Dill Companion

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    Jun 8, 2017

    I personally think it is silly to be rigid about "what I love to do." Be flexible. Adapt. Open up your mind to new ways of thinking. If physical therapy pays more, then find a way to start loving that. I have tried different careers, and I loved all of them. The one that cost me the least because I had a free ride in graduate school, and the one that gave me the fastest career prospects was teaching. If I had a free ride to law school, I'd be a lawyer right now. I might have been an economist, too. I loved all of these careers and others too.
     
  5. MathGuy82

    MathGuy82 Companion

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    Jun 12, 2017

    Come on board! We need teachers who are enthusiastic! Yes the pay can be marginal, but you get breaks and summers off (which we call it off even though I plan here and there during summer). Not to scare you but running a classroom with teenagers is a bit more work than tutoring. You will be fine though.
     
  6. skeptic

    skeptic Rookie

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    Jun 13, 2017

    I would suggest that you try subbing for awhile before you make a switch. You can continue on course and sub at the same time at a variety of schools. If you enjoy subbing then you could decide.

    Also you didn't mention how much longer you have in physical therapy, but if not too long there is something else to consider. Many high schools (where I live) have a position for a teacher/fitness trainer. You could teach part-time and be a PT-coach for sports. Even this can pay well as a part-time job on the side. (Google --> high school athletes turn to personal athletic trainers to get the edge).
     
  7. giraffe326

    giraffe326 Virtuoso

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    Jun 14, 2017

    I no longer teach, but I am in your geographical area and am still pretty knowledgeable about what is going on in the area.

    Since it sounds like you are not only willing, but enjoy teaching in the city, I feel you should go for it.

    Detroit always has open positions and there is quite a bit of job security due to all the vacancies. Compared to just a few years ago, jobs are easy to come by in general. (I'm sure my old thread chronicling my job search journey is somewhere in the archives. I went on about 50 interviews one year on a mission to secure a job.) Teacher program enrollment is down drastically, so the majority of the country is heading quickly to a major teacher shortage.

    You will never be rich. The first few years will likely be tight. But you also won't be destitute.
     
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  8. vickilyn

    vickilyn Magnifico

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    Jun 14, 2017

    My son needed PT when young, and although you can say it is therapy, you have to be a teacher at heart to work with kids. Perhaps you are romanticizing the teaching job because you are struggling with the PT course work. If you can bring yourself to finish, you may find a spot to grow and flourish working with kids with special needs. If, after making a concerted effort, you find you want "more", you can go into teaching, perhaps becoming an AR teacher. I have had many jobs in my lifetime, and appreciated each for its unique challenges. I don't know if I would still be a teacher if I had started here, because I just love learning. It is a visceral reaction for me - new things to learn, ways to grow, and the challenge to stitch it all together to make my life more meaningful. I never feel that any education is wasted - it is simply a step towards becoming the best version of yourself. I am always hesitant to encourage to someone to quit something once they have invested time and money into it, without finishing what they started. That seems a waste. You have a lifetime to meander over to teaching, and the experiences along the way will enrich your life. Take it from somebody old enough to see more of the intricate design in the fabric of our lives.
     

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