I can't STAND that little B and her mother!

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by Em_Catz, Dec 10, 2010.

  1. Em_Catz

    Em_Catz Devotee

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    ...is a small taste of what I hear from one of my coworkers about her students on a daily basis. I don't know why, but it rubs me the wrong way, especially since I work with many of the kids she is talking about.

    Am I being too sensitive? Believe me, the kids get on my nerves all the time too, but isn't calling a six year old a b*tch (even if it is to another teacher) crossing the line?

    I know we teachers aren't perfect and I guess, MAYBE if it's a severe behavior problem, it could be very aggrevating, but I don't think the kids she works with are that bad. At least not from what I've seen. PLUS, she talks like that EVERYDAY. It's not like a couple isolated incidents. AND she does it during school hours.

    I confess, I have called a kid a bad name before (to my mother) I know it was wrong, but I did it away from work AND the kid used to sit next to my desk and talk about how he hoped me and other kids in the room would die. (he'd get very detailed. the admins from that year of course did nothing)

    The stuff she gets angry about is if they forget pencils, or their homework or if they are talking to a classmate instead of working. :confused:

    But, I don't know, somehow it just makes me feel uncomfortable everytime she uses words like b*tch, a**, etc to describe the kids, because, again, I work with some of the kids, and I'm thinking, "Really? Are they that awful EVERYDAY that you have to talk about them like that?

    Or am I being too sensitive? I mean everyone has their limits. Someone might think I'M being vulgar when I say stuff like, "Yeah, today Johnny was being so annoying! ARGH, does he EVER stop talking?!"

    EDIT: She also talks about parents sometimes too. Like, "Jessica is a little B, then I met her Mom and now I see why"
     
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  3. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    People who don't like people, especially kids, should really find another occupation.

    A bad day is one thing I suppose. A bad career is eomething else.
     
  4. smalltowngal

    smalltowngal Multitudinous

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    Wow. There have been times I haven't been happy with my kiddos (and these are MS/HS kiddos), but I would never think to call them any name like that...or their parents, even if it was true! This woman needs to kind another career.
     
  5. skittleroo

    skittleroo Connoisseur

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    Wow- unbelievable. I can't imagine calling a child that. I have discussed behavior problems before and probably referred to them in a not nice way, but to call a child a **** is uncalled for. Sometimes I think we have to work extra hard to remember these are children. How unprofessional.

    I would have a very hard time listening to a coworker refer to a child as a b***ch.
     
  6. porque_pig

    porque_pig Comrade

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    This person is in the wrong profession.

    Teachers should be allowed to vent, but they should vent about problem students and their parents at home to people who don't personally deal with those students/parents on a regular basis. Complaining about specific students or parents at work (unless you are seeking advice about how to approach a specific problem behavior) is unprofessional. Complaining about them on a regular basis for silly reasons is a sign of being woefully out of place. Name calling? Yeah. That's bad news.

    We all have bad days, but we also are expected to handle ourselves professionally, and this particular teacher seems to have made a habit of unprofessional behavior.
     
  7. mmswm

    mmswm Moderator

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    I'm at a total loss for words....
     
  8. ku_alum

    ku_alum Aficionado

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    Appalling.
     
  9. luckyal29

    luckyal29 Companion

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    As far as using the word bitch, I don't see the word as an issue, not advisable to do but not a big deal. It's just a word and she's venting.

    Now as far as her doing it everyday, that would get on my nerves and if she's that unhappy she should try something else.
     
  10. jen12

    jen12 Devotee

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    I hate that word. I find it among the most disrespectful words a person can use, and people use it too too often to describe any and all unpleasant behavior from women. Also, it drives me crazy when my friends use it in a slang-type way..."hey bitches, what's up?"

    I would never even think to use it for a child...it just wouldn't occur to me. I've on occasion thought of them in less than flattering ways, but that word to me doesn't fit. And I certainly wouldn't use it in a professional situation, even among colleagues who I thought were friends. You never know who isn't really your friend.
     
  11. heavens54

    heavens54 Connoisseur

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    I think that calling a student any name is disrespectful. It is like calling a child dumb or stupid. It is unprofessional to do this. The teacher would not tolerate it if the situation was reversed...
     
  12. MsMar

    MsMar Fanatic

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    What she's doing is totally inappropriate. She should not be venting like that to her coworkers on a regular basis. She's being totally unprofessional.
     
  13. FarFromHome

    FarFromHome Connoisseur

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    I have never even thought about calling a child a name like that. If someone came in and started saying stuff like that to me, I would just get up and walk out of the room.
     
  14. DallasTeacher

    DallasTeacher Companion

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    Maybe a crazy question, but have YOU told the co-workers that you find her comments inappropriate? If not, the co-worker might feel you are a kindred spirit. I don't want anyone using foul language in my presence. Not appropriate and not something to which I want to be subjected, certainly not on a daily or weekly basis.
     
  15. John Lee

    John Lee Groupie

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    Unfortunately, I don't think this type of attitude is that uncommon in schoolteachers today. I sit in staff rooms daily, and I hear conversations that show ignorance, (if not promote) convey a level of intolerance and just show character traits that seem opposed to being a teacher. And they tend to come from the most unlikely of teachers often times.

    In CA, we have another teacher strike going on. This is another example, that tends to show or enhance the lack of character in individuals. On the picket line, you'll have teachers exhibiting behavior that you would hate for your students to exhibit. They not only try to intimidate, alienate, etc. support and sub staff (I'm not in it, mind you... just an interested observer), but some are downright nasty in their approach to those who oppose them. And this doesn't mention the appearance of these teachers, who come to show their solidarity in their "PROFESSION", by showing up looking like they just rolled out of bed (i.e. being a non-teaching day, I suppose those who did so thought that since they weren't "on the clock" they could dress down).
     
  16. TamiJ

    TamiJ Virtuoso

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    Dec 11, 2010

    That is not appropriate, nor professional. If she views her students as such, she has built a wall between herself and them, and I can't imagine she really has their best interest in heart. I would be very concerned.
     
  17. TamiJ

    TamiJ Virtuoso

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    I certainly hope that attitude is not common. I never hear any teachers speak that way. We certainly have some students who are more challenging than others, but to talk about them in the way the OP's colleague does is disheartening, not to mention disgusting.
     
  18. Sarge

    Sarge Enthusiast

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    Dec 11, 2010

    I had a little girl in my class last year who ...

    When I told her I'd call her parents and inform them of her attitude responded with "My mom has issues with you."

    Was constantly playing with toys during direct instruction time. When I'd take them, she would have a screaming temper tantrum.

    Once, I said I was going to call her mom and tell her about one of the temper tantrums. The girl's response was that she would just say I was lying.

    The mom took up an hour my time and the principal's time in order to complain about me. What was I doing that was so bad? Well, first of all, the girl had never been in trouble in school before - so therefore, I must be picking on her. She didn't like it when I called her to inform her of her daughter's misbehavior. And I was "undermining her authority as a parent" by suggesting that the girl wear a hat on the playground (super blond, super fair little girl who would return from recess beet red). I also wasn't giving any homework. I was, the girl just wasn't doing it and mom thought she didn't have any.

    In spite of the fact that you had a little Veruca Salt of a student and a mom who thought she had a kid who farts rainbows, I never once used derogatory language to describe either the student or the mom.*







    *Ok, I may have used the farting rainbows and Veruca Salt references a few times. I just couldn't help it because they fit so well.
     
  19. John Lee

    John Lee Groupie

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    I'm not saying it's common. I'm saying that it's not as uncommon as you or I would like to believe. Just this past week, I heard a 25-year, 1st grade teacher sit there and *I guess* attempt to emulate a Japanese-speaking student or parent (i.e. "ching chong...") while talking with her teaching cohorts during a recess break. Even on a much lesser level: I regularly hear teachers talk/gossip/back-bite among each other. It's so silly.

    The example I gave (along with the OP's example) are probably an *uncommon* exception. But in terms of just being a good person AND more so, a good leader (someone to look up to, someone with character, an ability to relate). I think quite a lot of teachers fall short in that regard.
     
  20. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    It doesn't happen at my school.
     
  21. indigo-angel

    indigo-angel Companion

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    :agreed:
     
  22. Em_Catz

    Em_Catz Devotee

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    Omg, that definately crosses the line. Totally racist. I do think I should let her know that sort of language makes me uncomfortable because I didnt realize that my not saying anything might be showing acceptance until someone brought it up.

    I just wanted to see what you all, who work at a variety of schools all over the country, thought. I didn't think this was normal behavior, but then, I never understood how a teacher would need a "mental health day" considering they have all summer off until I started teaching. :D
     
  23. Bengie03

    Bengie03 Rookie

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    Dec 11, 2010

    A co worker once did this right in front of the other kids. I was quite shocked that she would call a four year old that type of name. The child can be stubborn at times, but what child isn't. It just rubbed me the wrong way, to say the least. I would never call a child a name like that, its just not right or professional. I believe that no child whether they are misbehaving or not deserves to be called such a name, especially the B word.
     
  24. Em_Catz

    Em_Catz Devotee

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    Yikes! That is too much. She is lucky the child did not tell her mother. If that had been ME and it was MY mom, my mother would have gotten the teacher fired.
     

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