I called out a student and feel bad...help?

Discussion in 'High School' started by Cheekyone, Mar 16, 2016.

  1. Cheekyone

    Cheekyone Rookie

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    Mar 16, 2016

    So let me give you a transcript:
    Me: today we will
    BOB: murmer,talk,mumer
    ME: Bob?
    Bob: gets silent
    ME: ANYWAY, so we...
    BOB: talk, talk
    Me: Bob, do I need to move you(a bit annoyed tone)?
    BOB: No...
    ME: So...
    Bob: talk, talk
    ME: Bob, do you want to sit right here?
    ( point to chair next to me)
    Bob:No.( stops talking)
    I'm in my 6th week of student teaching and the first time this student Bob challenges me. I feel it makes class think I don't have control. I didn't yell, but I think you can tell I was annoyed. I talked to Bob personally and told him if he does it again, I will for sure move him, he then replied, well I'm absent tomorrow anyway...As you can see Bob is trying to challenge me now. I told him goodbye and look forward to see him work and to have a good day. I told him I really don't want him to fall behind. I told everyone great work and what not as they walked out but I still feel bad about what happened. Please any tips to make this better? What could I have done instead? I feel I did negative reinforcement caused him to be even more rebellious. Also he has an iep plan and no aid. High school students.
     
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  3. ms.irene

    ms.irene Connoisseur

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    Mar 16, 2016

    Well I for one have had this same exact conversation many a time. One thing to consider is that you really gave him three chances in this exchange. Next time, you might try just giving him the one warning, and then if he doesn't stop, just move him, no more discussion. This sends a stronger message and may actually cut down on the defiance since you're not giving him a chance to argue.
     
  4. swansong1

    swansong1 Virtuoso

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    Mar 16, 2016

    You don't even need to continue the conversation after the first warning. If Bob talks again, just point to the chair next to you and stand there until Bob moves.
     
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  5. Cheekyone

    Cheekyone Rookie

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    Mar 16, 2016

    Great. Thank you for those suggestions. There was a sub by the way and that made things much harder. What if he does not move if I use the technique? I will definitely consult with my cooperating teacher tomorrow. I also worry because he has an iep plan and losing concentration could be his disability...I felt bad and sort of had no idea what route to take at the moment.
     
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  6. Linguist92021

    Linguist92021 Phenom

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    Mar 16, 2016

    And don't ask him if he wants to sit somewhere. I know you're hinting, that if he doesn't stop talking, he will have to move, and does he really want to do that?? But asking sends the wrong message and he can say that "well, you asked me, I said no, I kept talking, so what?"

    Next time, stop and say "please stop talking when I'm talking" he talks again, say "if you're talking once more when I'm talking, you will move seats". Then, if he talks, move him.

    This is not even about him falling behind, so I wouldn't even talk about that, because in his mind, it wouldn't make sense. He could say "why can't I talk? I'm not falling behind". Just let himm know it's disrespectful and out of line to speak when a teacher speaks. That's it.
     
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  7. agdamity

    agdamity Fanatic

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    Mar 16, 2016

    Losing concentration may be part of his disability, and if so, part of his plan includes ways for you to help him refocus. If you haven't already, I would ask your cooperating teacher what his accommodations are.
     
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  8. Cheekyone

    Cheekyone Rookie

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    Another thing I should mention is they are used to the main teacher's rules which are not much strict, yet I'm adding more strictness to the class. It is challenging adding new rules in this position. But I like following through after a warning ideas.
     
  9. XFruitloopsrusX

    XFruitloopsrusX Rookie

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    Mar 16, 2016

    I would ask the student what you can do to help him learn better. Make "bob" take responsibility for his learning. Let him know the exceptions and let him decide what the consequence will be for not following them. Give him time to think let him know at the beginning of the period that your looking for a solution/consequence and check back in with him. If he doesn't have an answer by the end of the period tell him to think on it tonight and you'll think of one and check back with him tomorrow. When he comes up with a solution/consequence hold him accountable to it. Student teaching is tough and you have to take time to make relationships with students. Good luck and don't feel bad.
     
  10. TeacherNY

    TeacherNY Phenom

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    I wouldn't feel bad. I agree with the others to hold him accountable after the first warning.
     
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  11. otterpop

    otterpop Phenom

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    I don't think that holding kids accountable to their actions makes you too strict. Following through makes kids know where they stand with you. So, like others have said, say one time "you'll move here if you interrupt again," and then follow through with it if he talks again.

    There's a difference between strict and mean. IMO, students are more likely to accept strict (you got a warning, now you get the consequence) than they are to accept mean (yelling at Bob in the middle of class to get him to stop talking).
     
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  12. TeacherNY

    TeacherNY Phenom

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    Mar 18, 2016

    I don't see it as "calling out" either since you only warned him because he wasn't following the rules. I think it would be more calling out if you said, "Bob, you were the only one who failed the English test so you should be paying more attention".
     
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  13. 2ndTimeAround

    2ndTimeAround Phenom

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    I think you did just fine!

    And don't worry about the IEP. IEPs aren't designed to make it so students disrupt learning for others. If you have a special way to handle his disruptions, it will state so in the IEP. Do no more and no less than what he legally deserves. Having a disability is not an excuse for poor behavior nor is it a get out of jail free card. At least it isn't supposed to be.
     
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  14. artbrarian

    artbrarian Rookie

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    Apr 13, 2016

    Don't sweat it. You're giving plenty of chances. Next time I would just move him.

    I was giving a guest lesson at another school and one student had put all of his work away and just sat with his desk empty. I told him to take the work back out and finish it. He told me he would finish it later, I told him "You'll finish it now"
    He got huffy and sat up.
    Then he left the room.
    The teacher just ignored the entire thing, even his leaving.
    As I was a guest I thought it was especially rude. He came back about 3 minutes later and started working, but gave me an ice glare the rest of the class.
    Kids test limits. It's what they do, it's how they learn what is expected. If his regular teacher is usually more lenient, it's inevitable. You're fine.
     
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  15. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Maven

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    Apr 13, 2016

    I read a book that would break down your interaction in the following way:

    Me: today we will [Teacher starts lesson]
    BOB: murmer,talk,mumer [Student Disrupts]
    ME: Bob? [Teacher Says Students' Name (unclear redirection effort)]
    Bob: gets silent
    ME: ANYWAY, so we...
    BOB: talk, talk [Student continues disruption]
    Me: Bob, do I need to move you(a bit annoyed tone)? [Teacher makes Another Unclear Redirection Effort (feels annoyed)]
    BOB: No...
    ME: So...
    Bob: talk, talk [Disruption continues]
    ME: Bob, do you want to sit right here? [Teacher Threatens (expectations still unclear and unstated)]
    ( point to chair next to me)
    Bob:No.( stops talking) [Disruption Stops]

    Do you see how long the "teacher dance" was and how long the disruptions continued?

    You can shorten it down to this:
    [Teacher starts lesson]
    [Student disrupts]
    [Teacher states expectation and consequence once]
    (which was your last step last time)
    [Disruption stops]

    or
    (if the student continues to disrupt)

    [Student disrupts]
    [Teacher follows through with consequence]
    [Disruption stops]

    This is shorter and a lot less frustrating.
     
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  16. Cheekyone

    Cheekyone Rookie

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    May 12, 2016

    Sorry for being so late, but I love this break down!
     
  17. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Maven

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  18. bella84

    bella84 Aficionado

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  19. Sharerfamath

    Sharerfamath New Member

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    Jun 1, 2016

    Whatvif you try to give him an important role in the class suck as the teacher second hand or the helper so that he may feel that he is important in your class and will be shy to talk or make noisy
     
  20. Andy Ronon

    Andy Ronon Rookie

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    Jun 22, 2016

    That was not a bad interaction. Students are often acting out to get attention. While it may make you feel bad that you had to address his misbehavior, remember you are not there to be his friend. You are there to teach him a subject and to teach him a lesson. When he goes out into the world, the world is not going to give him a pass.
    The main thing that you must remember is that respect is something more powerful than friendship within the classroom. When students visit teachers after graduation, they often go back to the ones that kept them in line. As they meet the world they understand that what you instilled in them has great value. One student does not have the right to affect the education of others. You care about them but you are not their friend, you are their teacher. Making sure they understand that. eliminates a lot of problems going forward.
     
  21. Leaborb192

    Leaborb192 Enthusiast

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    Jun 22, 2016

    ,
     
    Last edited: Feb 4, 2019
  22. Leaborb192

    Leaborb192 Enthusiast

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    ,
     
    Last edited: Feb 4, 2019
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  23. teacherquestions

    teacherquestions Rookie

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    I think kids can try to push your boundaries sometimes and see how far they can get before you actually move them. I dont think what you said was harsh at all! Probably even could have moved him before that third warning.
     

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