I am not a lecturer , is that bad?

Discussion in 'High School' started by Dragon02, Jan 17, 2019.

  1. Dragon02

    Dragon02 Rookie

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    Jan 17, 2019

    I teach World Geography and I do not lecture. I know teachers that can lecture for hours on end but, that's just not me. I give them assignments and worksheets that are related to their text book lesson. At the end of the lesson is when we review all together. That's where I do most of my talking. My students seem to be doing ok for the most part with this style, but i feel like I want them to learn more. I'm thinking of having the online book read to them out loud in class and have students fill out a reading activity that goes along with it. I would be stopping to check for understanding along the way and have think pair share sessions. Does that sound like a better idea than what I am doing now? Any comments or advice would be greatly appreciated. Thank you.
     
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  3. tchr4vr

    tchr4vr Comrade

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    Jan 17, 2019

    I would step away from worksheets, at least sometimes. Have them complete maps--do virtual field trips to parts of the world they're learning about--there are tons online through Google and Nearpod and various other sources. If they're going to read from the text, have them pair up or read out loud, instead of passively sitting and listening. Projects galore.
     
  4. Dragon02

    Dragon02 Rookie

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    Jan 17, 2019

    I do maps, I do projects here and there , but when it comes to learning the content, getting the meat and potatoes of lesson, so to speak, I'm still wondering on how to deliver that. But yes, reading in pairs is something I will consider, thank you.
     
  5. tchr4vr

    tchr4vr Comrade

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    Jan 17, 2019

    Have you tried giving them notes more interactively--Nearpod or Peardeck? You wouldn't necessarily have to lecture, but both of those have collaborative and accountability pieces that can help keep the kids engaged. Is there a reason you don't lecture? This is just a personal thing--I teach English and Theatre, and I do have to provide historical background for time periods, etc. My text has a historical background piece in it, but I never have the kids read it--it's boring and they don't know what to focus on--I have powerpoints/Nearpods that have all the info and talk it through, adding little interesting tidbits that I don't really need them to know, but give them some fun facts that quite often, they remember, they usually show up in extra credit questions. I also add lots of pictures and videos to make it more engaging. So, I don't really lecture, but I do talk through what I want them to know.
     
  6. Linguist92021

    Linguist92021 Phenom

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    Jan 19, 2019

    I would also step away from the worksheets. there's nothing wrong with them reading the textbook on their own and answer questions (worksheets) but it's not good if that's what they do most of the time. administration definitely does't like it.
    I taught geography and I often supplemented with video clips of the culture of the given region. Granted it was Cultural geography so I went overboard, I showed them video clips of the country's / region/s music, dances, and language. Talked about their customs. Brought in sample whenever I could (Greek, Russian, Arabic, etc) I am a little bit of a culture and language freak so I know a lot about the culture of many areas (Eastern Europe, Middle East, Greece, Turkey, even a little of India, Japan, etc).
    I think going a step further and learn the cultures of the regions and pass them down to your students would greatly enhance their learning; they would get more out of it and it would be more interesting.
    I also did a lot "big picture" questions, such as why are most of the major big cities located near water? Why is it that people of the north are generally light skinned and people of the south are dark / darker skinned? (granted, this is cross curricular biology / anthropology but that makes it even better). Bring up certain facts they need to know and might not have learned or heard of otherwise (Russia - Chernobyl, India - Gandhi, Pakistan- Malala, etc)
    These can be just 5-10 minutes in each class as an opener or closure.Geography relates to history, politics, religion, language, music, dance, food, customs, biology, and so many other things.
    I think geography is important and we don't really take it that way. a lot of the adults in this country have no idea of most of the countries out there, they only want to know what's right here. that's sad.
     
  7. geoteacher

    geoteacher Devotee

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    Jan 20, 2019

    As you are new, I think it is fine to use the textbook for the basis of what you do, but then start to add in some variety. Rather than just doing worksheets, what about adding discussion to what you do? That can be less intimidating that lecturing. I also teach geography - six sections per day - and I try to look at it from the perspective of what interests me. When you need to impart content, put yourself in the place of the listener. What would make it more interesting to you? Impart that enthusiasm to students via the videos, etc. that you include in your lectures.

    One more question: are you comfortable with the content that you are teaching? I found that once I gained confidence and background knowledge with regard to my subject matter, lecturing, and teaching in general became much easier.
     
  8. MsCatherine

    MsCatherine Rookie

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    Mar 31, 2019

    I don't only teach geography, so these are general techniques that I use for all my classes--

    I try to mix it up. I don't think there is anything wrong with teaching from the textbook though. Do you have a teacher's manual? Mine has lots of suggestions, links, activities etc that help me make the content come alive.

    Sometimes we read the textbook as a class. I pause to ask questions and add my own explanations/ anecdotes. I may have students do a KWL chart, show a video, or start the class with a demo, just to keep things interesting and reinforce the content. I love how reading together gives me the opportunity to reinforce literacy strategies. If it is a long reading, we may skip some paragraphs, and I'll have them read on their own.
    Other times, students read the textbook on their own, answer questions, and we take up and discuss as a class.
    And there are also lessons where I give the students a general question and they brainstorm more specific questions, and are given time to research answers. Then we have a class discussion.
    My school also has iPads, so sometimes we do QR code scavenger hunts. I make QR codes for different videos, pictures, maps, images, websites and texts related to the lesson, and students answer questions or walk around taking notes.
     

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