I am an obsessive control freak!

Discussion in 'Substitute Teachers' started by minnie, Oct 12, 2010.

  1. minnie

    minnie Habitué

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    Oct 12, 2010

    That is what my sub will think tomorrow. I left THE MOST detailed lesson plans...six pages. I'm really embarassed. It's just that its kindergarten and I can't just say "have them read chapter three and answer the questions." I don't want her to be confused about anything. But then I totally went overboard...so she's gonna think I'm a nut job.
     
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  3. kcjo13

    kcjo13 Phenom

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    Oct 12, 2010

    :lol:

    You care! That's apparent...and appreciated by your students! Don't sweat it! I'm sure a sub would rather have too much info than not enough, especially in K!
     
  4. Subber

    Subber Companion

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    Oct 12, 2010


    Well, like you said, it's kindergarten. So, I am sure she'd appreciate the detail.
     
  5. Momma C

    Momma C Comrade

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    Oct 12, 2010

    Explicit instructions is one of the reasons folks enjoy subbing in my room. Everything is written out, rosters available, school schedule (lunch, etc.), all papers that may be needed, a form for class notes, and discipline forms. I think it's better to over plan than under plan. We have teachers that leave NOTHING !! And that's when the principal comes to me. :D
     
  6. UVAgrl928

    UVAgrl928 Habitué

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    Oct 13, 2010

    Agreed. It's horrible if a sub finishes tings quickly and then has downtime with the group. It puts a lot of work on the sub to come up with something to do.
     
  7. Mldouglas

    Mldouglas Comrade

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    Oct 13, 2010

    Speaking as a sub

    Speaking as a sub I can honestly say that I would much rather have everything written down to the letter than have nothing at all. I have been in both situations and the day went much smoother with the detailed lessons.

    Mldouglas
     
  8. Proud2BATeacher

    Proud2BATeacher Phenom

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    Oct 13, 2010

    I have co-workers who write 1 page lesson plans whereas mine are at least 6 pages long.
     
  9. TeachingHistory

    TeachingHistory Companion

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    Oct 13, 2010

    I agree... As a sub I LOVE detailed lesson plans, especially when I can find the materials needed. Even the best laid plans can be useless when I have to go on a scavenger hunt to find things...
     
  10. midwesttchr

    midwesttchr Rookie

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    Oct 14, 2010

    I once subbed for a teacher whose substitute folder was not a folder, but a BINDER. A very informative binder though! It was basically a portfolio created for subs. She included information such as:
    - Small bio on herself, that was originally written up for parents to read
    - Behavior management plan, as well as extra sheets and names of helpful students and students to watch
    - Emergency info
    - And, the most helpful section: a detailed description of the students' typical routine. This way, rather than having to type this up every time she has a sub, she already has her morning routine, center time routine, etc. down. All she has to do on the days she is absent then is write down an LP and have the sub refer to the binder.

    The district I sub in uses basal series for reading, math and science, so it's easy for them to plug in pages for a daily LP but also have a binder to descriptively explain typical routines for each subject.

    I just thought that was a nice idea for any classroom teacher to consider. :) That way you are set, and in the event of emergencies, you have down time ideas already suggested and routines written out. Plus, the sub does not feel pressured to read everything prior to students entering the class (although of course we hope they can). In the event of short preparation, the sub can read what they *need* most - the LP for the day, and then refer to the binder as they go.
     
  11. kimrandy1

    kimrandy1 Enthusiast

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    Oct 14, 2010

    I've been teaching PreK or K for 18 years and my sub plans are about 8 pages long (including transportation plans and calendar routines, etc.) Calendar routines alone are 1 page long! I also always start with a note that says to get done whatever you can, to change things if other ways work better for you, and to try to enjoy the kids because they're so special and wonderful! I have been told by subs that they like more detail rather than less, but that they also like knowing that if they change things a bit, it isn't going to make me upset when I return...

    I have the same standard routine thing all typed up and saved, and I just review and make changes each time if something (book fair or picture day, or whatever) comes up. It says things like "Language Arts, 10-10:55" and then I will have a page of just plans for that time after the initial schedule sheet.
     
  12. clarnet73

    clarnet73 Moderator

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    Oct 14, 2010

    I leave about a 3 1/2 pg plan at times for a half-day class :) Now that I have a fantastic TA (who could run the room if necessary), I don't have to write EVERYTHING, but always figure subs would like more info than less info... as a sub, I know I did!
     
  13. midwesttchr

    midwesttchr Rookie

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    Oct 14, 2010

    Oh my goodness, I LOVE it when teachers leave a small note to not worry if not everything gets done, OR to change things up depending on how things are going. I definitely try to stick to their schedule, but there are times where the class is so riled up, the LAST thing you want to do is get them paired up for a game. That way, I feel totally comfortable letting the teacher know that I decided to do read aloud or other instead, so that they can calm down.

    I'm sure they'd rather read that, than "We went ahead and played the game. Tom and Bob broke some stuff. Gladys and Jon pulled out all the kleenex and stuffed them in kids' backpacks. Maggie almost climbed out the window, and I almost joined her."

    To sum it up: Subs appreciate knowing where flexibility is. Sometimes it's not just about details, but what they expect from us as their stand-ins. :)
     
  14. minnie

    minnie Habitué

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    Oct 16, 2010

    well I guess she didn't think I was a psycho because when I got back, she wrote how nice it was to have a detailed lesson plan! I used to be a sub and so I try to make it easy for them. It's hard enough going into a classroom where you have no idea wha type of class you will get.

    Thanks for your replies! I felt better after I read them! :)
     
  15. substitutesftw

    substitutesftw Companion

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    Oct 16, 2010


    I think they will think the opposite: you are really organized and CARE about what's going on in your classroom. As I always say, clarity is key. I'd sacrifice a wordy lesson plan just as long as everything is very clear and thorough.

    I believe I once had a 5-6 page lesson plan. A kindergarten teacher, as a matter of fact! She is awesome and I will sub for her again soon. :D The first 3 or 4 pages of the plan are her "routines" like centers, free time games, calendar time, etc that they do everyday. The rest were the regular plans for the day.

    It definitely puts you more at ease when you sub for a class that has really detailed lesson plans.

    The only thing is, just in case there is a lot of work involved, they may not get to everything. As long as it's ok, everything will be fine.:thumb:

    On the opposite end of the spectrum, I once had lesson plans scribbled on a notecard. Or worse, none at all. I'd take 6 pages any day!
     
  16. substitutesftw

    substitutesftw Companion

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    Oct 16, 2010


    I absolutely agree! :thumb:

    Sometimes, you just have to amend things for practicality's sake. If I have a noisy class, there's no way I'm letting them "buddy read on the floor," as the plan says, when they'd be better off sitting at their desks and reading independently.

    Or, there are times when you just can't get to everything. The reading lesson may take a little longer than expected, so the science activity has to be cut short. In those instances, I just leave the work and I'm sure to describe how things went time-wise. I think teachers can understand, for the most part, because they have to be flexible with their own timing when they're in the classroom. I love to see a little note that says, "Don't worry if you don't get to everything. I overplanned." :wub:
     

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