Hugging, holding hand, and touching....paraprofessional and students

Discussion in 'Special Education' started by deefreddy, Apr 30, 2016.

  1. deefreddy

    deefreddy Companion

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    Apr 30, 2016

    Does anyone have a powerpoint or handout for paras regarding touching students or allowing students to hug them? I work in a MS High School class, and I am having a difficult time with one aide who thinks its appropriate to be "lovey-dovey" with students. I have spoken to her and asked my supervisor to deal with it, but it's still happening. I want to give her something she can read and sign so when I take it to the next step I can show I tried to educate her on why its a bad idea, both for her and the student. Hopefully someone has something...I don't want to reinvent the wheel this weekend.
     
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  3. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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  4. deefreddy

    deefreddy Companion

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  5. gr3teacher

    gr3teacher Phenom

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    Apr 30, 2016

    If it were me, I would alert administration to your concerns, I would alert the para to your concerns, but then leave it be. I really don't think it's your place to have them sign something like that.

    I think this is one of those times where standards are different for men and women, also. More context is also needed for me to make any judgment here. Is the attention focused on female students or males? Does she initiate hugging, or do students hug her? By lovey-dovey, do you mean inappropriate comments? Based on your description, I'd document specific instances, and give her very specific behaviors that you are uncomfortable with (it may also help if you can document student reaction, particularly in the case of comments being made).
     
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  6. vickilyn

    vickilyn Multitudinous

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    May 1, 2016

    We work very hard getting our students to understand appropriate boundaries. What may seem fine in the school environment is actually off putting in the real world, often keeping some of the students from being able to function normally in the workplace. Administration should be on top of this, to cover their behinds from potential lawsuits - your job doesn't cover this, IMO. You can lead by example, explain your rationale, etc, but if the administrators don't stop it, then I think your hands are somewhat tied.
     
  7. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    May 2, 2016

    Can you describe a little more what you mean by "lovey-dovey"?

    I will say that staff "allowing students to hug" them isn't a huge deal at any of the schools I've worked at. Is it possible that this person's behavior bothers you more than it bothers admin or the students?
     
  8. Muffin39

    Muffin39 Rookie

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    Jul 20, 2016

    I know I am posting on an older thread but it interests me..
    What kind of sped class are we talking about? I work in severe/profound and my kiddos LOVE to cuddle and snuggle and I am told there is nothing wrong with it by administrators and parents.
    My last job was in an Autism classroom. Some didn't want to be touched and others sought out pressure and/or affection. As long as they asked for it and initiated it, we always gave them the sensory that they needed.
     
  9. vickilyn

    vickilyn Multitudinous

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    Jul 21, 2016

    Giving them the sensory they need may be fine when they are smaller, but by the time they are in their teens, there is usually a push to get them to understand personal boundaries, in the hopes that they will be able to find jobs. Many of the students have NO personal boundaries, and that is not just with those they know. Their actions are off putting to others, making them uncomfortable to be around. For young adults who are trying to find a place in the world where they "fit", it is better to teach them about boundaries, and I have worked with paras who didn't seem to want to enforce the new behaviors, making them the favorites while making the mean Ms. L the heavy, because she can't see how innocent it all is. It is apples to oranges between the elementary set and the HS age students. Some paras seem to want to treat them all the same, which lessens the probability that they will succeed.
     

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