How would your school handle this?

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by texteacher, Sep 19, 2011.

  1. texteacher

    texteacher Companion

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    Sep 19, 2011

    So we recently got a new student in our grade level. This child isn't in my class but is in the class next door. This child is supposed to be on some sort of medication (the school is not sure which right now) but is currently not on it and probably won't get back on it for a while. When the child is not on medication he screams for hours on end, crawls on the floor, flicks the lights on and off, kicks the teacher or any other person who approaches, throws things and refuses to do any kind of work. The teacher next door spends hours teaching from her doorway so as to block him from running out of the room and down the hall. Whenever the office does get involved, they only take the child and bribe him with toys and treats and anything to get him to calm down. Right now we feel that they are only making it worse. It's like they're rewarding his tantrums. The teacher is receiving no other support besides that. I can hear the screaming through my classroom walls and it's very disturbing to everybody in our hallway.

    So my question is, what would your school do in a situation like this? How would they support the child and the teacher? I just know that there is a solution to this problem, but I don't know what it is. It can't continue like this. Nobody in my hallway can take it, especially that teacher and her class. Any advice is very welcome.
     
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  3. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Sep 19, 2011

    I don't think it's legal for anyone to physically block the door to prevent the student from running. I think that amounts to a seclusion, which isn't usually allowed unless stipulated in the IEP.

    I could be wrong. Maybe someone can clarify that for me?

    In any case, at my school they would involve the parents. They might even go so far as to put the child on a medical hold where the child cannot return to school until they've been cleared by a doctor.
     
  4. LiveNLearn

    LiveNLearn Comrade

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    I would cite ed code and suspend the kid until there was some sort of intervention by a SST for the child.
     
  5. texteacher

    texteacher Companion

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    I'm sure this could be true. However, how do you handle it when a child gets up to slam your door repeatedly and then bolt down the hallway? Do you just leave your entire class behind? This seems like a major safety issue to me.
     
  6. bros

    bros Phenom

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    Sep 20, 2011

    It sounds like the child needs to be evaluated for an IEP ASAP.
     
  7. KinderCowgirl

    KinderCowgirl Phenom

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    I've stood in the doorway to teach before-we're talking about elementary age kids-we've had them bolt and end up in the parking lot or worse, one ran down the street and almost got into some stranger's car. I would do whatever I had to in preventing that.

    Our admin is actually pretty good about situations like this (I know, probably not what you want to hear). We have a K student like that now, not medicated but very sad family history we think is behind the behavior. They've changed him to 1/2 days so the teacher (and other kids) can get a break for the afternoon. They will also come get him and remove him from the class when she just can't handle him anymore. What they do with him in the office I don't know, but I agree giving him treats every time he acts out doesn't seem like the most effective way to get rid of a behavior.
     
  8. mrachelle87

    mrachelle87 Fanatic

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    Sep 20, 2011

    No law prevents me from blocking the door to prevent escape --this teacher is keeping the child safe.


    An idea...I had a student like this once. He needed a place to calm himself. I had an open door closet that was on it's own lightswitch. I put a large pillow in there and when he needed to get away, he would go lay in there. I discovered he would usually sleep. When he was tired it was worse.
    I have seen teachers who have had soft fuzzy rug for these children.

    I am sorry your friend has to go through this...it is exhausting.
     
  9. texteacher

    texteacher Companion

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    We actually have a place like that for him, but he never wants to go there. Today he hit and kicked the teacher, threw wooden hall passes at students, destroyed the trashcan, threw her entire library on the floor and later in the day was given a cupcake...
     
  10. texteacher

    texteacher Companion

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    From rereading the above posts it sounds like most schools would go the special ed route? My school is very anti special ed but I'm hoping they'll make an exception. This poor child needs more help than what we can currently give him.
     
  11. BioAngel

    BioAngel Science Teacher - Grades 3-6

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    Sounds like having him be in the classroom is the WORSE/most restrictive learning environment for him and he needs to be removed to a more individualized instruction.
     
  12. swansong1

    swansong1 Virtuoso

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    Extreme measure, but if this teacher can't get any help, she needs to file assault charges on the student. At least that will bring the kind of authorities who can actually do something to remove the child from the classroom. The child is most definitely in the wrong placement.
     
  13. soleil00

    soleil00 Comrade

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    During my ST I had one kid that was a screamer. He would throw these massive fits if he did something wrong (cut wrong, colored wrong, etc.) or was told to do something that the directions didn't state directly. He threw scissors, kicked people, threw his pencil box, anything within his reach. We had to pry him off his desk one day to send him out of the room.

    Here, as I was getting to, we send them out of the room to a behavior specialist aka "Buddy Room" where they have to stay for however long the teacher specified which can be a full day or even multiple days. They don't eat lunch with us, they don't go to recess or special areas (art/music/library) with us. They are kept with the specialist. She talks to them about socialization, rules, finds out what caused the tantrum, and other stuff like that to get to the bottom of what in the world happened.

    He is being tested for autism this year if we can get him recommended for it... but I agree with others that there is definitely something deeper going on here and he may not need to be in your room all day, if at all.
     
  14. JustMe

    JustMe Virtuoso

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    I cannot imagine blocking the door being illegal. The alternative is to let the elementary student run out of the classroom, down the hall, and out of the building?

    Not sure how my school would handle it...but I bet it wouldn't be amazing, so I don't have anything to offer there. Good luck!
     
  15. Auter12

    Auter12 Comrade

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    This sounds VERY similar to a student I had. He was a 4th grader, and had ODD (oppositional defiance disorder: lehman's terms - tell him no and he freaks out; obviously there is a lot more to it than that, I know) The admin did very little, and when he was sent out of my room, they ended up giving him rewards of sorts!:confused: I ended up teaching from my door as well. My class was well practiced in ignoring him!! When it got to the point the disruptions got so bad that we couldn't teach/learn over them, I would send him out, knowing he was getting rewarded for his behavior, but also knowing that the rest of the class would suffer if he stayed.
    We had clear procedures for this, but the admin wouldn't follow through, so I did what I could in-house, within those guidelines. I would suggest following school procedures for the situation, and that teacher seeking some kind of help for intervention. Maybe ask for admin to observe, request a parapro for one-on-one, etc. It isn't fair for anyone involved in this situation (including the student) and something needs to be done.
     
  16. bros

    bros Phenom

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    The phrase special ed tends to evoke images of a self-contained classroom.

    The child needs an FBA to be performed. Why is the child acting like this? What does the child's private doctor say about this and how to manage it in the classroom?
     
  17. bros

    bros Phenom

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    Yeah, blocking the door isn't illegal.

    As long as you aren't let's say, locking a student in a room.
     
  18. teacherintexas

    teacherintexas Maven

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    If this is in Texas, they are breaking the nutrition law.
     
  19. shouldbeasleep

    shouldbeasleep Enthusiast

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    Our principal takes the child out of the classroom, documents the distruction (if there has been any) with a camera, then if the child can't calm down, he calls the parents/guardian to come get the kid. I don't know about a lot of the melt-downs because no one talks about them at our school. I did see the aftermath of the office after one 1st grade kid threw things around last year. I know that the resource officer was called in, the grandparents had copies of the pictures of the destruction, and the child was suspended from school for a few days.

    I don't know what he says to the parents. These kids are in kindergarten and first grade, once in a while in 2nd grade and new to the school. We don't have any kids like this in the upper grades unless they have just transferred in. Perhaps it's because the principal doesn't allow students who are disruptive to stay in the classroom disturbing the learning of others? Perhaps parents are made to be accountable and we don't consider ourselves to be a babysitting service where you just drop off your kid and go on your way?

    We have BD students, we have a few kids who have outbursts (and they get detention even if they are kindergarten), we have a consistent school-wide discipline plan, and we have the backing of the principal.

    The kids love our school and love the administrator. The principal stands at a major intersection every morning, greets each kid by name, hugs them if they want one, discusses positive things with them both at school and at home, teases them, admonishes them in a friendly tone, congratulates them, etc. They adore him.

    The assistant principal greets each kid as they come off the bus and does the same thing as the principal. Very friendly atmosphere, but you'd better not act up and keep others from learning. Your parents will be called and you'll be sitting at home.

    I would also say that neither one of them cares about the number of referrals to detention that the school has. Many schools in our district have principals who think it looks bad if the school has a lot. He prefers to have a reputation of "You'll love this school, but you have to respect it."
     
  20. Loomistrout

    Loomistrout Devotee

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    Sep 21, 2011

    Yup. Reinforcement error. Let's see... you get out of class and get a treat? Can't beat a deal like that.

    Actually, sounds like the office gives out the goods because they don't know what else to do. This is why relying on the office just because it is the "office" is not always a good strategy. Title "Administrator" does not guarantee they are any better equipped to deal with problem students than a typical person off the street.
     
  21. kpa1b2

    kpa1b2 Aficionado

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    Sep 21, 2011

    Sounds like a child I had a couple of years ago. Major screaming tantrums when he didn't get his way i.e. time to clean up, or I asked him to move away from someone. Mom was no help. She was too busy to help her son.

    We got to the point that after x number of tantrums Mom was called. Then it progressed to him only coming to school for 1/2 a day.

    He left our school at the end of the year. I heard later that he was doing the same thing at the next school.

    BTW the behavior for me didn't start until after Christmas break.
     

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