How to teach comprehension?

Discussion in 'Second Grade' started by Teachnewbie12, Aug 23, 2011.

  1. Teachnewbie12

    Teachnewbie12 Rookie

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    Aug 23, 2011

    I'm Special Ed, and I work currently with two students in the classroom. My question is, how do you teach comprehension?

    Do you stay on one strategy for two weeks? I have lower level students.

    How do you extend the strategy for that period of time? Do you usually use the same book, over that course of time?

    I was thinking of using Reading A-Z books, since those are accessible to me, or the Harcourt intervention books. I unfortunately do not have the workbooks that go along with the books!

    In a typical week, of teaching a comprehension strategy, what would it look like? I would need to start with connections first. Would I read the book aloud first *think aloud*, read together, and then have them read?
    I also only have 45 minutes every day to do this.

    Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated!
     
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  3. mopar

    mopar Multitudinous

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    Aug 24, 2011

    I think that you can be flexible with your strategy instruction. When I teach comprehension, I spend a lot of time modeling and guiding the students. You may even ask the students to read something and then one or both students could do a think aloud. You can always extend to writing or drawing pictures as well.
     
  4. pjones858

    pjones858 Rookie

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    Sep 12, 2011

    Teaching them subjects and predicates will improve comprehension. I always have them identify the action word (verb) first, then tell "who" does the action to lead them to the subject. When I read a story aloud to them, I stop and we pick out the verb and then the subject in sentences as we go along.
     
  5. ladyinpink

    ladyinpink Rookie

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    Nov 10, 2011

    Teaching comprehension strategies will last as long as you need them to. Work on it until they get it. The Reading A-Z books are ok. I really only enjoy the non-fiction ones. I use sticky notes a lot with my kids and it has really helped my low kids. They have so much fun using the sticky notes they don't even realize they are learning something.
     
  6. Cathy Pelzmann

    Cathy Pelzmann New Member

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    Nov 17, 2011

    I am a special education teacher and often work with young kids. When you are working with children this young, you will want to do a lot of games with words. At this age I wouldn’t worry about being eclectic. Sing Spell Read and Write Reading Kits is a mini language arts curriculum.

    Some suggestions for reading material: Primary Phonics Storybooks by Educators Publishing Service. This series combines well with the Bob Books. My First Phonics Readers from Scholastic. These can be purchased through school book clubs which you can join as a home schooler. A Beka Book. These readers are from a Christian view point. Also, you might try the beginning Explode the Code workbooks; they are excellent for work on phonics.

    The materials below will help you with your home program. I suggest combining them with active games (an active game I use is described below.)

    * Jumpstart Phonics Learning System Ages 3-8: Software.
    * LeapFrog - Letter Factory
    * Leap Frog - Learn to Read at the Storybook Factory
    * Meet the Letters: by Preschool Prep
    * Reader Rabbit: The Great Alphabet Race
    * Reader Rabbit: The Letter Factory

    Jumping Game: Write letters with contrasting sounds on sheets of paper, perhaps use m, s, and t. Use lower case letters—you might want to start with only two and be sure that only one of the letters is new. Set the letters out on the floor so they are all facing the same way. Spread them apart with about a foot of space between words. Review the sounds of the letters. Instructions: I will call out a word and you repeat it. Jump to the sound you hear at the beginning of the word. The word is [say word]. Your child repeats the word and jumps to the letter. You might have to demonstrate this. Bring me your letter. Now say the first sound. (Some children jump first and then say the sound, which is also fine.)
     
  7. Rabbitt

    Rabbitt Connoisseur

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    Feb 12, 2012

    I use the Daily 5 CAFE.
     
  8. TamiJ

    TamiJ Virtuoso

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    Feb 12, 2012

    I do focus on one strategy a week. I model a lot, and we practice together, and when they do their own reading they journal about it after reading time.
     
  9. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Feb 12, 2012

    I'm spending a lot of time on each strategy...and embedding those lessons in genre studies as well.
     

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