How to talk to general education teacher about ways to teach class?

Discussion in 'Special Education' started by teacher girl, Jul 22, 2013.

  1. teacher girl

    teacher girl Comrade

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    Jul 22, 2013

    First time LD teacher- I want to pull small groups, do you think that it would be easier to do that?


    OR
    do you think it would be easier to co-teach?


    I really don't wan't to co teach, I just want to work with my students. lol. But I am afraid that it won't be seen as inclusive. Your opinion from experience, which is easier to do?

    Share lessons with general ed teacher, or just pull out students?
     
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  3. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Jul 22, 2013

    Do you get a choice in this matter? In my experience, admin decides whether there will be co-teaching or pull-outs.
     
  4. bella84

    bella84 Aficionado

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    Jul 22, 2013

    :yeahthat:

    I can't remember if you've said what grade level(s) you're working with in any of your posts... If it's secondary, I think what Caesar said is correct, at least in most cases. If it's elementary, you may have a little more leeway. It would be determined by what is on the IEP though. If the IEP says services are provided in the regular ed setting, then you have to push-in/co-teach, at least until you revise the IEP. If the IEP says services are provided in the sped setting, then you have to pull the students out. It's pretty straightforward if you look in the IEP, but I would check with your administrator to make sure you are following the expectations.
     
  5. bros

    bros Phenom

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    Jul 22, 2013

    Check their IEPs and go from there.

    If you have to co-teach, then you'll face your fear and overcome it with flying colors.
     
  6. geoteacher

    geoteacher Devotee

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    Jul 23, 2013

    Also talk with the regular ed teacher to see how the two of you can collaborate. One of the LD teachers at my grade level wanted to co-teach - very good teacher, so that would be fine - but had a five minute walk to get to my room, so we had to make adjustments because class had already started.
     
  7. HistTchr

    HistTchr Habitué

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    Jul 23, 2013

    Doing pull-outs wouldn't fly at my school. Special ed teachers are expected to co-teach with the general ed teachers. I had a co-taught class for years, and the two of us were together in the room 90% of the time. Students with IEPs were only pulled out on test days so they could work in a smaller setting and have the tests read to them. On the other occasions when we did split up the class for small group teaching purposes, it would be with heterogeneous groups of students. Like others mentioned, much of this would depend on your students' IEPs, as well. If they are scheduled for co-taught instruction (or inclusion), you wouldn't be able to pull them out since that would be in violation of their plans.
     
  8. catnfiddle

    catnfiddle Moderator

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    Jul 23, 2013

    I have had some amazing co-teaching experiences. The best so far was dividing things so that I would teach the knowledge and Jenn (my SpEd counterpart) would the skills. She would also act as a "student advocate", asking me questions she was pretty sure the students might have and clarifying things that might go over their heads. It was amazeballs! I'm switching to a new grade level and am going to miss Jenn's skills, but I'm hoping it will work just as well with my new counterpart.
     
  9. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    I love this, cat. I would do the same thing when I was supporting in classrooms. I would ask the teacher for clarification of things that I knew some of the students might be struggling with but wouldn't ask themselves. She always knew what I was doing, and the students got the clarification they needed without feeling that they were appearing "dumb" for asking questions.
     
  10. BumbleB

    BumbleB Habitué

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    Jul 23, 2013

    I would definitely check with your admin before deciding if you're going to pull out or co-teach. I would say with 90% certainty that they have a certain way they'd like you to work with the kids that is non-negotiable.

    When I transitioned from all resource to all co-teaching a year ago, I thought I'd hate it. After spending a year co-teaching, I have to say that I really like it! If you have to co-teach, go into it with a positive attitude. You may end up liking it!
     
  11. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    I'm moving out of Special Ed next year for a variety of reasons. I'm exciting about the change and won't miss the paperwork, meetings and politics of Special Ed at all. I will miss, desperately, co-teaching.
     
  12. mopar

    mopar Multitudinous

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    Jul 26, 2013

    If your administration and the IEPs give you some flexibility on the model you use, I would definitely sit down with any teacher who works with students on your caseload. You don't want to demand how things are done, but you want to get an idea of how the two of you can work together to meet the needs of all students, but especially the students with IEPs.

    I would also not view your job as to just work with the students on your caseload. You definitely need to meet their needs, but you will also need to work with other students.
     
  13. bella84

    bella84 Aficionado

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    I think this is dependent upon the school/district. In my building, as long as I am doing pull-out resource services, I am strictly responsible for providing services to students on my caseload. If I choose to go through the hassle of paperwork (changing placement from sped to reg. ed.) and doubling the size of my group (to have at least as many non-IEP students as IEP students), then I can choose to work with other students, but it is not an expectation. I have made the choice the do that this year, as I think it is best for the school as a whole, but last year I told my assistant principal I was not able to handle the additional students. I had backing from the district-level sped admins, and my AP had no objections to me telling her no.

    I really think the OP should probably ask her admins what the expectations for her position are.
     
  14. ecteach

    ecteach Groupie

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    Jul 28, 2013

    Not only the administration, but the IEP as well.

    Most Special Ed teachers want to pull their children and work with them, but this isn't always allowed. Unfortunately, sometimes the inclusion teacher becomes more like an aide, just walking around helping kids.
     
  15. atkhorses

    atkhorses Rookie

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    Aug 25, 2013

    First day co-teach

    This is my second year to co-teach. I want to introduce myself in thhe most positive way so kids do NOT think of me as a para. I'd like to distinguish to the kids our roles. A question I got lastyear was 'why do we have 2 teachers'? I have agreat gen ed teacher and we worked a lot like catnfiddle.

    I want to set the bar up front with the students so they understand why there are 2 teachers. I am also working on an intro tograb their attention.

    I teach high school Bio, IPC & Physics
    Thanks
     
  16. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Aug 25, 2013

    Sounds promising, atkhorses. Is there something you'd like A to Z members to help with or make suggestions about?
     
  17. atkhorses

    atkhorses Rookie

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    Aug 27, 2013

    Intros

    Yes, I meant to ask, but my keyboard was not working.

    I was preparing for my first day (yesterday). I co-teach high school physics, bio and IPC. I was looking for some guidance on introducing myself to the class. Once the gen ed teacher introduces themselves, the student seem to wonder why there are two teachers. I didn't want to come across as the 'Special Education' teacher---they tend to want to know why there are two teachers and not one like other classes.

    So
    I incorporated that 'this is a large class so there is a need for two teachers. We will work together as a team to teach physics and how they are lucky to have gotten into this class! " During one class, mentioned the district hired too many teahers and so they had to put me somewhere!! That was an attention getter! i then gave them a little background about my family, hobbies and how I became a teacher----trying to establish an open door to communication with me in the future.

    It seemed to have gone well. I'm looking forwardto the year with my co-teachers. I'd sure like to hear how other co-teachers introduce themselves and handle the role in the classroom. Thanks everyone!
     
  18. dgpiaffeteach

    dgpiaffeteach Aficionado

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    Aug 27, 2013

    We introduce our sped teachers as sped teachers but explain that when they're in the room, they're there to help anyone who has a question. I believe in being completely upfront with my students. My students treat everyone pretty well. They obviously catch on that so and so leaves the room for every assessment. However, that type of bullying is one thing our school doesn't have as much trouble with. Our IEP kids are very upfront about needing extra help and some of them are the most popular kids in our school. We're also a very small school though. We have kids on IEPs even in our honors courses.
     
  19. RadiantBerg

    RadiantBerg Cohort

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    Aug 27, 2013

    It goes like this:

    Hi class, my name is Mr.___________, and this is Ms.________________.

    We have no reason to discuss why there are two teachers there---kids know.
     
  20. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    Aug 27, 2013

    I always introduced myself as a "Resource Teacher" (official title was Special Education Resource Teacher) who was there to offer extra help to any students who required it.
     

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