How to reward speaking up with extra credit

Discussion in 'Secondary Education' started by a teacher, Jan 15, 2015.

  1. a teacher

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    I want kids to speak up more in class so I'm ready to give extra credit. It's too hard to remember afterwards who spoke, so I'm considering giving a student list to each kid when they speak up to put a point next to their name. It may be an awkward process. I'm wondering if anyone has suggestions. Thanks!
     
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  3. dgpiaffeteach

    dgpiaffeteach Aficionado

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    Have kids write their names on index cards. When they speak up, they pass up one index card.
     
  4. Linguist92021

    Linguist92021 Phenom

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    Class Dojo, used on your phone is the easiest, but you can use it on your laptop or ipad. It's instantaneous, easy to use, and no need to tally up anything later. You can even put it on the screen for them to see.
     
  5. Rockguykev

    Rockguykev Connoisseur

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    I'd hesitate to reward for something like this unless you only want them speaking up for the reward. Speaking out really ought to be an expectation.

    That said, I have tracked participating with tally marks on my seating chart before and had no trouble keeping up.
     
  6. a teacher

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    I'm just thinking if they see the points then it will be more motivating. If I just mark them myself, they don't realize it in the same way.

    It is an expectation, but that doesn't matter. If you don't reward them they don't speak up.

    Class Dojo they won't see unless they're signed up. Can they sign up without their parents having email? It seems a hassle because you have to go through a lot of steps to get a class set up.

    I like the index card idea. At first I thought that would require too many index cards over and over, but I could collect one and then pass it back to them to reuse for next time!
     
  7. Linguist92021

    Linguist92021 Phenom

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    They don't have to sign up for Class Dojo to see it. You can pull it up on your laptop, and if it's connected to the projector, they can see the main page where it shows everyone's point.
    Their parents don't have to sign up either, it's a nice addition if they want to stay in touch, but it's optional.
    Students don't have to do anything, you create the class by entering their names, and that's it.
     
  8. 2ndTimeAround

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    I'd do it randomly. Not every kid that speaks up gets rewarded. Like certain questions will get the reward, drawing sticks, something.
     
  9. a teacher

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    Isn't that going to be hard for the kids to figure out?
     
  10. Koriemo

    Koriemo Comrade

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    Can you have classes compete against each other? Each time someone speaks up, the class gets a point. You can have limits on how many points an individual can get to make sure that one student doesn't monopolize it. Then the winning class can get some sort of reward- a free homework pass, extra credit on a quiz, pick their own seats, etc.
     
  11. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Maven

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    I just use a seating chart and a tally mark.

    If they offer an answer, they get a plus next to their seat on my chart. If they are being non-productive, they get a minus. I could use this to calculate the points if I was being picky, but I usually just take a glance at my chart and give my participation points holistically, because other students show participation in ways that I don't always mark on my chart. (i.e. working quietly and in a focused manner, or guiding other students towards working effectively.)
     
  12. 2ndTimeAround

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    There's nothing to figure out. Say "I'm going to randomly choose students that participate today to earn bonus points." That way they don't expect points each time they speak, but it gives them incentive to try.
     
  13. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Maven

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    :thumb:
    Sometimes it's better to keep students in the dark about our grading procedures.
     
  14. CatfaceMeowmers

    CatfaceMeowmers Companion

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    I discovered fairness sticks while substituting and definitely plan to use them. You draw a random stick (all sticks have the students' names on it) and they are called on to answer the question. If they are prepared, they receive a tally on the roll sheet. If not, maybe next time and move on. The fairness sticks makes it so every kid has the possibility of being called on even if they are not prepared. It helps students listen, since they never know when they are going to get called on.

    As for bonus points, Class Dojo is pretty good, but I did a store with it and it too so much time. You could do class rewards. If a class reaches a certain number of points, the class is rewarded.
     
  15. CatfaceMeowmers

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    Also this! Definitely announce it to them! They will be on their toes and ready to listen. You could see which ones are participating actively and write down their name or type it in and do a random pick! That way they see it's random and don't feel cheated.
     
  16. msleep

    msleep Rookie

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    Jan 17, 2015

    You should never give extra credit.l Grades should reflect their knowledge of the materials. Extra credit does not reflect their knowledge.

    You should only grade the standards and not the path a student took getting there.
     
  17. Linguist92021

    Linguist92021 Phenom

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    I respectfully disagree with this. Extra credit is perfectly fine for speaking up in classes, especially if otherwise they just want to sit and do their work. I have an ELD class where they should be talking, so I use Class Dojo for participation. (it's true, they actually get a grade, not extra credit, but if I had a really hard time to get them to speak, I'd be ok with extra credit)

    And you can most definitely grade the 'path they take to get to a standard". It's not their final grade, but it's one of the many grades they will receive. (in class assignments, etc)
     
  18. 2ndTimeAround

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    I feel that way about curves. But not a few points extra credit here and there.
     
  19. olivecoffee

    olivecoffee Companion

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    The district in which I student taught had "participation grades." So speaking up in class would count for a grade and I would tally it on a clipboard if you don't want to use Class Dojo. You can announce to the class what you are doing, so that even though they don't *see* the points, they see you making the tally marks after a student speaks.
     
  20. a teacher

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    Yes, the extra credit won't add up to much, but because the idea of extra credit gets their attention and motivates them, it's something I can use.

    It was weird, because when I tried the index card idea the other day I didn't get much response. They're amazingly clueless that way. I have no problem giving extra points to kids who are going to check into reality and actually speak up. As for calling on kids, I do that all the time anyway. Why give them points? The points are for their taking incentive. I don't need sticks to call names off of unless I am concerned about not calling on a random enough group.
     
  21. a teacher

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    It's crazy. Been using the index card approach but not only am I not seeing a flurry of hands go up each time there is an opportunity to earn points by just speaking, those who do speak up often forget to put their index cards in my bin.

    WEIRD! And sad for them...
     
  22. swansong1

    swansong1 Virtuoso

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    Why? Because extrinsic motivation works for them?

    Glad you have found something that works!
     
  23. Myrisophilist

    Myrisophilist Habitué

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    I believe OP was saying that the method hasn't been working.
     
  24. a2z

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    I believe OP was talking about the fact that those that do speak up don't bother (or forget) to hand in the cards for their extra points.
     
  25. a teacher

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    Correct. The worse and sad situation is that they are still not very motivated. Maybe its time for negative reinforcement (i.e. deducting points for NOT speaking up)?
     
  26. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    CCSS has speaking and listening standards. Use a checklist.
     
  27. swansong1

    swansong1 Virtuoso

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    I understand that speaking up in class is very important to you.
    Is there any way you could have them talk about their completed art projects relating them to the theme, artist, etc that you are working on for that project?
     
  28. a teacher

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    You can always force them to talk by calling on them. The problem is that I want to see them volunteering. It shows motivation. Maybe I'm too hung up on that...
     
  29. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    You can call on them, but you can't force them to talk. Providing a variety of ways for students to participate--orally, in writing, on a "graffiti" wall, through movement (e.g. 4 Corners), can help all feel secure and comfortable.
     
  30. swansong1

    swansong1 Virtuoso

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    I have taught many children who are square/triangular pegs and don't fit into prescribed round holes. For those children, I find different techniques that encourage them to participate.
     

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