How To Move For a New Job

Discussion in 'Job Seekers' started by NewTeacherNJ, Oct 20, 2012.

  1. NewTeacherNJ

    NewTeacherNJ Rookie

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    Oct 20, 2012

    I'm posting this seperate then my other post since its about something completely different but i'm wondering how this works. Should you bother applying for jobs in other states before you have a license in that state? How do you go about getting a license in another state? It's a lot of money so how do you decide where youre going to transfer your license over to and risk not being able to get a job there as well?

    I ask because i've been seriously considering moving as of late and im just trying to figure out the game plan for how to do this.
     
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  3. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Oct 20, 2012

    I think that it would be best if you had a license in the state where you're planning to apply. The second best option is to have an application for that state's license in progress when you apply for a job there.

    Some states may be willing to consider candidates who don't have an in-state license. With this economy, however, and the fact that teaching jobs are so scarce in many places, I think that you should do whatever it takes to make yourself the best possible candidate for a job. That probably means, at a minimum, having the state's license in hand when you apply.

    I think that you should go ahead and begin the licensing application in a couple of states right now. I know it's expensive, but it's less expensive in the long run than not having a job at all. Pick a few states where you think jobs might be available and where you could see yourself living for at least a couple of years.
     
  4. waterfall

    waterfall Virtuoso

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    You definitely the state's license. Pick just one other state and you've doubled your chances of getting a job. Some states have complete reciprocity where you don't have to do anything but pay for the license, which is generally less than a hundred dollars. I moved to a new state for my first teaching job and the opportunities/market here is just SO much better than my home state. I can almost guarantee I'd still be subbing if I hadn't moved.
     
  5. SCTeacher23

    SCTeacher23 Comrade

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    Oct 21, 2012

    I definitely think you need to have it in hand. I graduated from college in North Carolina, so I had my teaching license in NC soon after graduation. I moved back to my home state, SC, and could not get any interviews in the state! This is because my certification in SC was pending. But when I applied for jobs in NC where I had my certificate, I got a few interviews. As a result, I did not get hired in SC and had to wait for the next school year to get a position in SC. I got called for several interviews the next year when I had my certification.

    Same for when I moved to NJ a year ago. I did not have my certification in hand and while it was pending, did not get interviews. However, once I got it, I got some interviews and ended up getting hired in September. And others are right, it is often just about paying a fee and getting your materials together. I was able to get my SC and NJ certification by simply paying a fee. I only took the NC praxis.
     
  6. OneBerry

    OneBerry Comrade

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    Oct 23, 2012

    I have had a similar experience. Whenever you figure out where you may want to go, I'd advise you to apply for the new certification IMMEDIATELY. My most recent certification took literally 6 months to transfer from one state to another, and I didn't even need additional coursework or anything... it just took them that long because evidently they were swamped with applications. I was unable to get a classroom teaching position for this academic year and I'm betting that had something to do with it, as the certification didn't come in until schools had started. I'm sure that's not the norm, but it's something to be aware of. :2cents:
     
  7. DKM

    DKM Rookie

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    Oct 23, 2012

    I got hired before I had my certification in North Carolina and just got it today. It took 3 months for it to be processed.

    You have to craft your CV to mention that you qualify for the state's teaching qualifications. Also, if they interview you, you better have turned in the paperwork already or they won't even consider you.

    I purchased 3 state license... only got jobs in two of them. And the one I didn't get a job in was my home state.
     
  8. tonysam

    tonysam Comrade

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    Oct 30, 2012

    Like that is practical. You do understand it can cost up to a thousand dollars to get certified in each state. I couldn't afford to even get a substitute license in Oregon; I had to have Job Council pay for it. It cost almost 500 dollars just for the sub license. (You have to take a teacher ethics/civil rights exam from Pearson just to be certified as a sub in Oregon on top of all of the fees.) I STILL have to get licensed for sped and elementary ed. Since I am not considered a good enough teacher for Oregon, despite having six years of contracted experience in another state, I have to take the same idiot tests a sophomore in college here takes. That's because I don't have five years in one subject area. That would probably cost me--and the Job Council won't help here--upwards of 1,000.

    I guess it doesn't matter because most of you guys are married and have another income.

    It's not really practical advice. You can thank Congress and No Child Left Behind for this garbage. The law makes it almost impossible to move from state to state without having to be tested over and over and over if the states don't count your experience as equivalent to some bimbo's right out of college.

    Pearson (and, to a lesser extent, ETS) is making money hand over fist with these unnecessary exams.
     
  9. tonysam

    tonysam Comrade

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    Oct 30, 2012

    Few or no states have true "reciprocity." Few are going to let you slip by without paying exorbitant fees.

    You may be talking about provisional licenses. However, that isn't possible for me since mine expired years ago.

    BTW, any state or district that has jobs is not going to be a good one to work for. It's time for a little bit of honesty. The best districts will have a great amount of competition. The worst districts just chew up and burn out teachers so that they can never work elsewhere.
     
  10. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Oct 30, 2012

    Wow, tonysam. Bimbos? Really? Your negative attitude towards others who go through the processes needed to find a job is unnecessary.

    My district, high performing as it is, hires between 3-5 teachers a year due to retirements and student population needs. Yes, it's competitive...but so is the job market at large. The best advice is for a potential candidate to make themselves as competitive as possible in terms of education and experience....and a positive, professional attitude.:thumb:You might want to work on the latter, tony.
     
  11. Lovetoteach15

    Lovetoteach15 Rookie

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    Oct 30, 2012

    As someone earlier mentioned, I actually got a job in NC before I had my license as well. At least in this state, as long as your license is pending, you will probably still have a chance at getting a job. Whenever I was asked at interviews about my teaching license (something I did not mention at all in cover letters), I let them know that I had applied a couple of months ago and the principals seemed to be fine with that.

    I also, as someone said, would make sure that you do have your paperwork in before you apply though. If you don't have paperwork in at all in the other state, you won't have a chance at the job.

    I think having your license in multiple states can only improve your chances at landing a job.

    Also, I disagree with the fact that the best states/districts won't have jobs available. Some of the best schools in my area still have positions open right now, mid-year. So I would suggest to keep trying.
     
  12. donziejo

    donziejo Devotee

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    Oct 30, 2012

    When I moved from Utah, I applied for a license in Nebraska, Arizona, Louisiana, Nevada, Florida, and Mississippi. (maybe one other)
    Nebraska was around 100 dollars plus fingerprinting, Arizona, I paid nothing but did not get an actual license, Louisiana did pay can't remember how much, Nevada, never followed through to license but no money changed hands.

    In Nevada, I did interview over the phone and sent in transcripts, Florida, had to take state tests in state (did not find this out until I had sent a ck for over 100 dollars) so I did not follow through.

    Mississippi, talked to someone at MDE, sent 25 dollars, transcripts, 3 letters of recomendation, references, and received 5 year license, Now I had 3 out-of-state licenses, Applied for jobs in La, Ms, Nebraska, and two jobs in Arizona (no license.)Offered job first in Mississippi. I live in a STAR district and a very nice part of the state. However, I work in a rural school district and drive 13 miles to another district. It's the best move I could have made and I'm Happy.

    I got offers from La, and Nebraska and ARizonz. Arizona, told me I needed to get a license before I went futher.

    The states I got the serious job offers are the states I had the license.

    It was a lot of work. For each job I had to send in my transcripts, resume, cover letter, and letters of recomendations. The biggest headache was many districts would send my references an online request. I was applying to many different schools so it was time consuming for them to continue to fill out all the paperwork.

    I should proof what I just typed, but I need to leave. So excuse the mistakes....but in my experience, My job offers came from states that I had the license.

    Good Luck!
     
  13. Cicero

    Cicero Companion

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    Oct 31, 2012

    I'll go ahead and be the third person to note being hired in NC before being licensed here. Maybe this is the place to come, ha! I did look up and see the requirements to become licensed in my area for NC before applying, however, to see if I could even be considered. My district only needed my Praxis scores, my TN license, and transcripts as proof while my NC license was processing.
     
  14. NewTeacherNJ

    NewTeacherNJ Rookie

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    Nov 5, 2012

    My school had reciprocity with 49/50 states. However one thing Tony did say that I agreed with is its very pricey. Its hard working on sub paycheck (in nj right now after hurricane sandy schools have been closed for 6 days my paycheck will literally be $0) having near $400 in student loans per month and then paying hundreds of dollars to all these states with no job offers.

    Funny a bunch of you mentioned NC as that is the state im seriously considering moving to. I just don't want to move without a job. Is job market in NC the same as NJ?

    Wondering how they interview? If i get a job interview but i live out of state do they skype or phone call? Does that lower my chances? Do they really expect you to hop a plane for an interview?

    I feel im probably going to have to get a license before applying. Or at least have it pending. Max im going to be able to do is 2 states. And that wont be for a bit as well. What states are really hiring right now? I always hear good things about Ohio for teaching but i always wanted to live near a beach.
     
  15. houseofbooks

    houseofbooks Companion

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    Nov 5, 2012

    I would also like to have more information about NC.
     
  16. mcqxu

    mcqxu Comrade

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    Nov 5, 2012

    Ohio is a tough area for teaching jobs right now, and your chances are much higher if you already live here when you apply. Definitely make sure to have an Ohio license first. It is a strong union state, so in my opinion a good place to teach in the public sector.

    I know a few teachers who taught in NC for a year or two and came running back to Ohio. My understanding is that in NC public teacher salaries are set by the state, rather than individual districts. So for example, in Ohio there are districts that pay very well with great benefits, and others not so much, but you always have the option to apply to better paying districts and possibly increase your standard of living by a lot.

    *FYI, I truly mean no offense or disrespect to NC teachers, so please correct me if this info is wrong!
     
  17. HeatherY

    HeatherY Habitué

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    Nov 6, 2012

    I'm going to go against the crowd on this one.

    First, I'd find out which states your state has reciprocity with. To do that, call the state you are interested in and ask. They'll send you a packet of info that tells you what you need to do.

    Then, I'd put something on my resume that says "Willing to relocate, capable of being licensed in X"

    If you do get an interview in another state, then start the ball rolling so you can go into the interview and say "Yes, I am in the process."

    I've been relicensed several times and it gets pricy. I don't think places would realistically expect someone from out of state to have it before they were interviewed, but it'd be good if you knew the requirements and could expand on that in an interview- then you look capable. ; )
     
  18. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    When there are 500+ people vying for a single position, the school/district isn't going to waste their time on someone who isn't already licensed in the state. Licensing can take months, which can mean that a newly hired teacher who isn't yet licensed might not get into the classroom until well into the year.
     
  19. houseofbooks

    houseofbooks Companion

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    I agree with Caesar. I know NJ is so competitive that they won't even consider someone who isn't certified in the state. Because of a new law, they can't even hire a teacher who lives in another state. It's definitely a good idea to have the certification done ahead of time. It can take awhile to receive the certificate, too. When I applied for my K-12 English CEAS, it took a little over three months to receive it. My K-5 Elementary CEAS took 2 months.
     
  20. Lovetoteach15

    Lovetoteach15 Rookie

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    I am not sure how the job market in NC compares to NJ, however, I do know in my area there are still multiple positions posted weekly, so there are at least some openings. There is a lot of competition with many large colleges in the area, but I would not say it is impossible to get a job. I got a job after applying for three months (and this was mid-year).

    As far as the salaries in NC, there is a base salary, but most districts have a supplement on top of that. You will get paid more in certain districts than other. Most counties have their pay scale on their websites.
     
  21. Cicero

    Cicero Companion

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    Nov 9, 2012


    Someone before me mentioned salaries. This is what I know from my experience: NC salaries are set by the state, but I know my district actually supplements the salary on top of that so I actually make a little bit more than I would if I were teaching in other nearby districts. This is shown in our "salary schedule" located on our district website.

    I had two phone interviews before I ever made the 5 hour trek to my current city. One ended in a job offer over the phone (which, honestly, I thought a tad odd) and ther other ended in a follow-up call to arrange for me to come in for a face-to-face. I appreciated that system, because if they didn't like me over the phone that saved me the trip.

    I just received my NC license a few weeks ago, but I have been teaching since day one in my position.
     
  22. teach42

    teach42 Comrade

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    Nov 11, 2012

    I would target a few states and apply for the licenses. I think it would be very difficult to get a job in NC without at least having applied for the license first unless it was perhaps a private school. I tried before without applying for one and never got any interest. Compared to NJ, they don't pay very much at all but the COL is slightly lower. They don't have a union either. I'm interested in eventually moving there too but sigh, the ~20k salary cut is making me hesitate. Some districts do give supplements but it's not that much.
     
  23. SCTeacher23

    SCTeacher23 Comrade

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    Nov 18, 2012

    Unless things have changed drastically in the last 2 years, I would say NC is a much better market than NJ in my opinion. I went to college in NC and graduated in 2009. I never actually taught in NC, but I did apply for some jobs and considered teaching there. I think I went on about 4 interviews in the state and eventually was later hired in SC. After I accepted my position in SC, I continued to get several calls for interviews in NC (probably about 7 or 8 additional calls) that I had to all decline since I already accepted a position in SC. I moved to NJ a year ago and was hired a few months ago, and I must have applied for hundreds of jobs and only got 3 interviews and was eventually hired from one of those interviews to my current district. I am just basing it on the fact that I got called for about a dozen interviews in NC and only 3 in NJ. I also applied for way more jobs in NJ and was very selective in NC, but still got way more calls in NC.

    Also, I keep in touch with several friends from college, most of who applied in NC, and almost all of them got jobs straight out of college. Even friends that I have that were younger than me - 2010/2011 graduates were hired out of college. Most of them though, got hired very last minute - weeks or even days before school started, but all got hired. The college I graduated from in NC has a really good reputation in the state for education.. I don't know if that helped a bunch or not.
     
  24. waterfall

    waterfall Virtuoso

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    Nov 18, 2012

    I agree also...I know a friend who even had that experience in NC. She is a sped teacher, which from what she said they're still pretty desperate for in that state. She applied all over the state and wasn't hearing anything, so she literally drove down there (about a 12 hour drive) just for a job fair. If you're driving 12 hours to go to a job fair, I think that shows you're really interested and committed to relocating...but she found that the first question out of people's mouths was if she had a license, and when she said she didn't but would apply, they wouldn't even give her the time of day. They told her to come back when she had the license. She ended up getting it just 3-4 weeks before school started, and got something like 15 interviews in that time and was hired. On the flip side, she also said the working conditions were bad. She did move out of state, but it could have just been her school...as a special ed teacher she had almost 50 students on her caseload because NC offers no protections about how many students can be with one teacher. In our home state of OH, there is a law that says you can't have more than 16 as a sped teacher, so that was obviously a huge shock to her.

    ETA: To the person talking about moving to OH...I wouldn't recommend it. In my college program I knew only two people that were able to get jobs in OH, and they were both hard to fill positions that were outside of their license area. My program was dual elementary ed and mild/moderate special ed. One person got a middle school sped position and another person got a severe/profound needs pre-k position. Everyone else had to move. I literally applied to every district in the state my first year out and couldn't find anything. My dad works at public school and his school literally gets 4,000- 6,000 applicants for each position, and they're not even one of the best or highest paying in the area. They also routinely let people go for budget reasons each year, so even if you're the lucky one out of 4,000 to the get the job, the chances of keeping it the next year area slim. It's really crazy. At this point, I'm very happy where I am and don't see myself trying to go back anyway, but I knew even before entering college that if I really wanted to teach I wouldn't be staying in Ohio. The pay is good compared to the COL, good benefits, and it's a strong union state...that's why people never leave their teaching jobs!
     
  25. SandyCastles

    SandyCastles Companion

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    Nov 18, 2012

    I also was hired in NC this year. I did not have the state license nor had I yet applied for it, but I knew my praxis scores would transfer because I had taken the same test. I had quite a few phone interviews and one Skype interview. I was offered 3 positions within the span of a week and ended up with my choice of a job. This was after years of searching in the Northeast and also teaching overseas. I also know one other person from my state who moved down a week before I did with the exact same situation. My county has applied for my license for me, but I haven't gotten it yet.
     

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