How to modify for diverse learners?

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by dy11685, Jul 30, 2010.

  1. dy11685

    dy11685 Rookie

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    Jul 30, 2010

    I have to present a lesson as a student teacher and I am expected to modify my assignments for diverse learners (ESL students and students with ADHD). I am presenting it to a Kindergarten class and I would like some help as I have no idea where to begin since I've never given a lesson for diverse learners before.
    I am teaching rhyme through nursery rhymes.
    My assignments after the class are as follows:

    The students receive a sheet with sentences that have fill in the blanks and use long list of words they can choose from.

    They will play a memory game that they created based on the rhymes that was taught during the lesson (they were asked to write it down in boxes during the lesson

    They will receive a list of all the ABC’s and need to figure out which letters rhyme (they can choose to use a blank sheet or one that has the amount of columns equal to the amount of letters that rhyme to make it easier)

    During computer time, students will play a word sorting game to practice learning how to sort words that rhyme and end with the same letters.

    How do i provide modifications for such assignments? How can I make it simplier or allow for different types of responses.

    TIA!
     
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  3. mom2mikey

    mom2mikey Cohort

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    Jul 30, 2010

    If you have done any student teaching at all you have a taught a group of students who have diverse learning needs. You may not have set your lesson up for that but you were teaching students with diverse needs as I would venture to think you would be hard pressed to ever find a classroom without diverse needs.

    I'm not understanding your assignment. Are you supposed to pick one of the tasks that you have outlined or are you doing all of those things in one lesson? How long is the lesson?
     
  4. dy11685

    dy11685 Rookie

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    Jul 30, 2010

    The lesson is about 20-30 min and I go through different rhymes, first showing them how to identify rhymes and then having students work with me and identify rhymes or offer suggestions for rhyming words

    the first two assignments are mandatory and done in groups after the lesson. The second two assignments are extensions and are done during as additional extra credit or at later points in the day/week.
     
  5. roseteacher12

    roseteacher12 Habitué

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    Jul 30, 2010

    these lessons seem a little difficult for K. Are you going to be doing this in the beginning of the year?
     
  6. Lynnnn725

    Lynnnn725 Connoisseur

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    Jul 30, 2010

    I wouldn't use words. I would use pictures. That would make the child think about the sounds they hear in the word, and not the letters they see.
    The pictures are also good for those ESL students who may recognize a picture, but not a word.
    Having a hands-on activity will help the kids who need movement.
     
  7. KinderCowgirl

    KinderCowgirl Phenom

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    Jul 30, 2010

    I agree with Lynn a picture is worth a thousand confused faces. I might even start with or story-there are so many with rhythm and rhyme that can be identified. I usually preview any unknown vocab for ESL students (well, for the whole class because usually there aren't many who already know all the words) but it's an official modification for ESL.

    I agree the worksheet with a word bank and asking them to write words in a box for memory is going to be hard for them. You may want to do the memory game with picture cards? They could be given one set of the pair and have to come up with another word that rhymes (draw a picture and maybe sound out the word to write it). For the advanced kids, I'd have them make their pair of rhymes. I agree a hands-on activities are great for any kids, but particularly the young ones!
     
  8. MzMooreTeaches

    MzMooreTeaches Cohort

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    Jul 30, 2010

    Perhaps you can try acting out the nursery rhyme. For example with Humpty Dumpty... have children pretend that they are humpty dumpty... build a wall with blocks, have the child sit on it, fall and the kings horseman try to put humpty together again.

    Another idea to extend on humpty dumpty... (and im not sure if you can do this) but we let a real unboiled egg fall and tried to have the kids put him back together again... the kids loved both activities especially the egg!
     
  9. MzMooreTeaches

    MzMooreTeaches Cohort

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    Jul 30, 2010

    With Kindergarten... another idea.. just think of a way to incorporate movement along with the nursery rhyme..
     
  10. dy11685

    dy11685 Rookie

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    Aug 1, 2010

    I know the lesson sounds a little difficult but it is easier than it sounds and this school promotes literacy very early on. I really loved the picture idea for the ESL students that's exactly what i wanted. Any other ideas of how to modify any of the assignments for a student with a different type of learning disability (particularly ADHD)?
     
  11. Lynnnn725

    Lynnnn725 Connoisseur

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    Aug 1, 2010

    The fact that they are playing a game and not doing a worksheet is great for ADHD (and everyone else, lol).

    How are those lessons mandatory? I teach first and wouldn't dream of giving my kids sentences at the beginning of the year. I would probably do a shared reading (we are all reading together) of the nursery rhyme and talk about how some of the words sound the same at the end. Whenever we read the poem - whenever they notice a rhyming word they could put a thumb up or pat their belly or something. this gives them movement and engagement.

    Then play the memory game with pictures of words that were in the poem, not the actual words. A picture of Jack, a hill, etc.

    I would have magnetic letters and let them sort them by sound instead of having it written down. I must say I don't agree with this activity though.... It will be confusing (in my mind) for them to be focusing on how the sound of the names of letters rhyme.
     

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