how to make autistic student read?

Discussion in 'Special Education' started by ambitiousgirl, Sep 11, 2007.

  1. ambitiousgirl

    ambitiousgirl Rookie

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    Sep 11, 2007

    Hi,

    has anyone ideas how to help an autistic student to read? My student (elementary school) tends to open up a book and then look at it, but he doesn't read. He is able to read, but when it comes to free reading time, he is oppositional to read. Like I said he just looks at the book/words.

    Thanks for any input!
     
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  3. tchecse

    tchecse Companion

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    Sep 12, 2007

    Vary the reading options....menus, catalogs, comic books, etc.

    Put a preferred activity after the free reading time so that he knows he has to follow directions in order to get a "fun" activity

    Find a computerized reading program/stories on the net he can read

    Vary indiv. reading time with being read to.
     
  4. Proud2BATeacher

    Proud2BATeacher Phenom

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    Sep 12, 2007

    I am not sure of the age of your student but maybe have him read with another student -- they can take turns. You may also have him record himself reading.
     
  5. ambitiousgirl

    ambitiousgirl Rookie

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    Sep 15, 2007

    Tchecse,

    thanks for your input. I will try some of your ideas!

    Thanks!
     
  6. ambitiousgirl

    ambitiousgirl Rookie

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    Sep 15, 2007

    Proud2BAteacher,

    thank you, too, for your suggestion! This is also something I definetely can try!

    Thanks!
     
  7. AspieTeacher

    AspieTeacher Comrade

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    Sep 19, 2007

    ambitiousgirl,

    I know how you feel. Students with autism (ALL LEVELS not just severe) feel blocked when they are suddenly "requested" to do something that they weren't even aware of. I would suggest that you do a mini-visual activity schedule with a choice of the student's favorite "reinforcer" and allow him to make the choice of what he wants to do. If he is given a choice and he sees what you want "visually" it will reduce his anxiety level of feeling like he's "on the spot". Start out real slowly and once he gets the "routine or ritual', you can fade out the reinforcer. Students with autism prefer structured, patterns, with a level of expectancy and very little surprises. I hope this helps you.

    aspieteacher
     
  8. ambitiousgirl

    ambitiousgirl Rookie

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    Sep 19, 2007

    Aspieteacher,

    thank you so much for your input. I will try a reinforcer...maybe I can try stickers..... usually reinforcer don't work that well with him.. the other day I explained him my 'deal'... that I want him to read two sentences to me and then I would give him his space (he doesn't like having a helper b/c he doesn't want to be different at all- I am his one on one - so sometimes he asks me to step away ;-) So this worked :) I think I will try to increase the number of sentences after a while. Other teachers are working with him on reading and reading comprehension as well. My goal right now is to get him used to reading (not only opening a book, looking at the pictures and words) during his free reading time. We will see how that works.

    Thanks for your suggestions!
     
  9. AspieTeacher

    AspieTeacher Comrade

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    Sep 19, 2007

    You're welcome and THANK you for working with ASD students!

    Ambitiousgirl,

    I'm also a teacher in the Los Angeles area except that I work for the County Office of Education. I have been teaching students with moderate-severe autism for about 7 years now and I love it. This is one of the most rewarding careers I've chosen. I also was diagnosed with AD (Asperger's Disorder) before I became an autism teacher. I know exactly how these students think, because I walk in their shoes.

    Troy aka Aspieteacher:D
     
  10. ambitiousgirl

    ambitiousgirl Rookie

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    Sep 19, 2007

    Aspieteacher, I am sure you are wonderful with your students. And I am sure that you can help them even better as you exactly know how they think! Yes, I think it is very rewarding to work with children with special needs. I love working with autistic children, too. Just to see a little progress each day makes me happy! or gettin a little hug from one of my students who then tells me 'that we are friends'. :) This is only my second school year but I have never been happier!
     

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