How to dive into robotics

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Camel13, Dec 24, 2019.

  1. Camel13

    Camel13 Companion

    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2013
    Messages:
    109
    Likes Received:
    26

    Dec 24, 2019

    Hello,
    After a recent application to a new teaching job that includes a robotics club along with the science courses I am proficient in, and having my own Makerspace/ STEM course this year, I am realizing I really need to understand robotics and coding! I have attended a PD on the implementation of coding standards that teachers need to be including and I definitely see the application, but I still feel in over my head. In my STEM class I have several students using LEGO Mindstorms and having a blast learning and teaching each other all on their own. I honestly don’t have a clue how they are coding their robots. I have done a little scratch/ block coding, but I get extremely impatient with it, because I feel so behind learning which includes progressing to Java, Python, etc.

    My question here is, does anyone have a good resource for teachers like me that are behind in learning this, and need to catch up quickly to help their students effectively? I know I should have been working on this before now, but only three years in teaching with six preps has made it hard to tackle much beyond keeping my head above water. Thank you for any suggestions folks have!
     
    Tired Teacher likes this.
  2.  
  3. Tired Teacher

    Tired Teacher Habitué

    Joined:
    Jul 31, 2019
    Messages:
    836
    Likes Received:
    458

    Dec 24, 2019

    The only type of resource I can think of is: I'd hire a college (or maybe even a HS- cheaper) student to teach me 1 on 1 in the summer. Over the years, there have been some things I just do not "get" when it is presented 1x to a huge group.
    I know a great young guy who has taught me whatever I needed to know. ( If you don't have access to teens, ask around at a high school, college, church, wherever you trust someone. You'll find one who wants to make $$ on the side.)
    Then make sure you have your exact questions and needs written down and keep/take detailed notes. Have him/her walk you through the process. Then if you get stuck later on , on your own, you can call (and pay) for their time.
    Also, if stuck and you have gotten someone you trust, you can have them do remote access when/if desperate.
    I haven't done this in a few years, but I had excellent success w/ it. The key is in making sure you know exactly what you need to learn or ask. It saves you time and money! :) Also, the key is finding the right tutor. I was very fortunate and hope the same for you. Good luck!
     
    Last edited: Dec 24, 2019
  4. Obadiah

    Obadiah Groupie

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2015
    Messages:
    1,358
    Likes Received:
    840

    Dec 26, 2019

    I'm a bit off topic, but perhaps not. I'm 61, and lately I've been considering how tremendously technology has changed education and the world. Yesterday, my Mom was telling about how they would walk to a nearby house to use the telephone, and how they got their own first telephone when she was a little girl. At that time it was a party line--I suppose that was a precursor to social media. Then there was television. Her father decided not to get a TV, but later on my grandmother did obtain one. Today, most everyone, including me, has a tiny rectangular box kept in their pocket. I can set it to play any kind of ring tone, vibrate, (or my favorite), no sound or vibration at all. But wait, that's not all. Right now I'm listening to swing/jazz on my phone, I have an uh-oh alarm set at 8:25 to get going, not long after I woke up I checked the news, if I want to, I could watch TV on my phone; I don't have to talk, I can type messages or even talk via video phone; I can listen in to fire and police radio all around the U.S.--and I thought our little scanner in the living room was something; why, this little rectangular device even slices, dices, and makes Julian fries (well, no, not really, at least not yet).

    Now we've got robots roaming around our food market. I waved to one just the other day prior to setting my groceries on another robotic self-checkout conveyor belt.

    Legos. Wow! Now when I was a kid, I thought I was high tech with my toy fan that lifted up a balloon with a toy spacecraft on the bottom in my living room. I did build cool stuff with my Lincoln Logs, but the only robots I was familiar with were "Robot" from Lost in Space and the one on Get Smart (who wasn't all that smart compared to today's robots. Max would say to the robot, "Kill the lights," and so he'd take out his gun and shoot the lights).

    I'm about ready to get in my remotely started car that has so much tech inside I feel like I'm on an episode of the Jetsons. Hmmm, now if only I could fly over the traffic, but I hear that's coming, too. In the meantime, here I am typing on a PC; when I was a kid, I thought my Mom's manual typewriter was high tech.

    And now we have kids learning robotics in school. That and coding. Coding. When I was in school, it was the manuscript alphabet, cursive alphabet (which is vanishing now), and 9-10th grade Spanish. OK, we did use an electric typewriter for 1 day in high school typing class; (forward to modern times, as a teacher, for awhile, another teacher and myself were in charge of the early elementary keyboarding lessons). Passwords; when I was a kid, to join our secret club you had to say the password. Now, on the New Posts, there's a post about keeping passwords secret; computers can decipher passwords so proficiently that we need to change them each month and soon alpha-numeric-symbol passwords won't be sufficient.

    Oh, well, I have a meeting on the planet Jupiter I have to get to. I'll write more later.
     
  5. Camel13

    Camel13 Companion

    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2013
    Messages:
    109
    Likes Received:
    26

    Dec 26, 2019

    Haha! You are so right. I was born in 1980 and I can’t believe the changes in my short life. I feel the constant pull and push and wanting to get students back to simple joys yet getting them prepared for jobs of the future...I always think of the possibility that humans will so mess up our planet or country that we have to go back to a subsistence living....and that high tech students will not be able to survive. Yet they love distortion novels! Makes you wonder...
     
    Pisces and Obadiah like this.
  6. Pisces

    Pisces Rookie

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2019
    Messages:
    69
    Likes Received:
    39

    Dec 31, 2019

     
    Last edited: Jan 2, 2020
  7. Pisces

    Pisces Rookie

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2019
    Messages:
    69
    Likes Received:
    39

    Dec 31, 2019

     
    Last edited: Jan 2, 2020

Share This Page

Members Online Now

  1. Roxy ruins,
  2. futuremathsprof,
  3. RainStorm,
  4. brandy sanchez,
  5. waterfall,
  6. tigger88
Total: 502 (members: 8, guests: 474, robots: 20)
test