How to deal with suprises with Maturity

Discussion in 'Secondary Education' started by HistoryGuy89, Aug 15, 2011.

  1. HistoryGuy89

    HistoryGuy89 Rookie

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    Aug 15, 2011

    This spring, I student taught seniors, and the main thing that struck me was their lack of maturity. I honeslty felt like I was teaching much younger students. Even simple requests such as " be quiet while you do you work" were ignored. Has anyone else had to deal with such a scenario, and if so, what did you do to alleviate the situation?
     
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  3. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Aug 15, 2011

    Ignoring teacher directives isn't a sign of immaturity. It's a sign of disrespect, at least to me. I'd address it in the same way I'd address any other behavior issue: conference with the student, phone call home if necessary, reseating, maybe a detention--any or all of the above.

    How did you handle it during your student teaching? What did your cooperating teacher advise you to do?

    To me, immaturity is giggling at inappropriate things, making farting noises, that sort of thing. Generally I solve those problems with The Look or a "Really?." (I don't know how to punctuate the tone I use, but the question mark/period combo seems most appropriate.)
     
  4. KatherineParr

    KatherineParr Comrade

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    Aug 15, 2011

    I agree with Caesar about respect. I teach juniors, but last year the seniors gave a new teacher a hard time and it had nothing to do with maturity. They wanted to make her miserable and they worked to do it.

    So it's possible that somehow the classroom dynamic worked against you. You mentioned in the other thread that the main teacher undermined you at times. That probably didn't help them to respect you and listen to what you had to say.
     
  5. HistoryGuy89

    HistoryGuy89 Rookie

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    Well, he basically let me handle things on my own. I think it has to do with me being a bit to leineint with some little things. I'm not the most assertive person in the world which doesn't help either. Then again, I'm kind of a hard-case, and when I'm in work mode, I'm in work mode, and I expect the same of those around me. It doesn't help that, at least it seemed to me, that I was entirely different than what they were used to.
     
  6. misterdee

    misterdee Rookie

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    Aug 16, 2011

    Did other teachers in the building ask these students to be quiet while they worked? Perhaps the expectations throughout the district were that a certain amount of talking during work time is ok. Also, it is normal for students to test new teachers to see if they will follow through with discipline or just threaten.
     
  7. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Aug 16, 2011


    It sounds to me as though you're sending mixed signals to the kids-- and remember, as big as they are, they're still kids.

    On that first day, give them your expectations. You classroom is a place where learning will take place, and they need to be quiet if that is to occur.

    Then enforce it every single time.

    Seniors are good about reading people. If you are consistent, you'll find they're remarkably fun to work with.
     
  8. HistoryGuy89

    HistoryGuy89 Rookie

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    Aug 16, 2011

    I think consistency was a big problem of mine. I also really didn't lay down the law from day 1 when I took over, due to that observing the first 5 weeks, I didn't feel there were going to be problems, and that I didn't have to explain things that should have been obvious.
     
  9. a2z

    a2z Maven

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    Aug 16, 2011

    Unless you are in a school that requires all teachers to have the same policies in their classrooms, the same consequences consistently enforced, etc there is nothing that should be treated as "obvious". Teachers can be like night and day with what they tolerate or expect from very strict, structured teachers to lenient, laid back teachers where not much is a problem.

    Time to set expectations, set consequences and apply consistently and fairly.
     
  10. KatherineParr

    KatherineParr Comrade

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    Aug 16, 2011

    Agreed. It's not that you need to "lay down the law." It's that you need to figure out what your classroom management style is, then live it. Students, especially older students, respond to authenticity as much as anything else.
     
  11. 2ndTimeAround

    2ndTimeAround Phenom

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    Aug 16, 2011

    I've heard more teachers complain about seniors than freshmen. The seniors are way too entitled, IME, and they have this belief that they are big men/women on campus and that everyone, school staff included, are to bow down before them.

    My biggest challenges are with juniors.
     

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