How to deal with a student who tries to talk like he's a thug

Discussion in 'Secondary Education' started by bbelton60, Mar 29, 2016.

  1. bbelton60

    bbelton60 Rookie

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    Mar 29, 2016

    I feel like there is a huge issue at the school I work at with students who are severe "wannabes". There is a copycat culture of kids who want the persona of a thug or gang member.

    I am currently dealing with a student who has taken this desire to an extreme. The last few days he has talked ad nauseam about how he ditches school, how he gets high every day, how his probation officer won't leave him alone, running from the police, and all things criminal related. He literally has gone bell to bell talking about "thug life".

    For kicks and giggles, I looked up his cumulative, and nothing about it confirms his stories. No SARB tickets, has never been caught with drugs on campus, no arrests or citations, etc. I also looked him up in our system (which tells us when a student has a PO) and he does not have one.

    His spiel is getting really tiresome and it is bringing down the morale of what is generally a good class period. He's not breaking any school rules, but I definitely want to nip this issue in the bud. I feel like addressing this with counseling or campus aides would only feed into his "thug" persona. Another teacher recommended calling him out in front of the class about not having any record when he starts his nonsense but I'm worried that would turn him completely against me or embarrass him more than most 16-year-olds deserve...

    Any thoughts or comments?
     
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  3. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Mar 29, 2016

    I do not recommend calling him out in front of the class. That will be humiliating for him and could lead to him shutting down in class (best case) or retaliating in some way (worst case).

    I'd get his school counselor involved.
     
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  4. dgpiaffeteach

    dgpiaffeteach Aficionado

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    Mar 29, 2016

    I would absolutely get the counselor involved.
     
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  5. linswin23

    linswin23 Cohort

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    Mar 30, 2016

    Yes, I third the school counselor involved ASAP. Do not call him out. I had a few girls like this my first year teaching and I made the mistake of calling them out in class and they broke down/retaliated. This kid is clearly looking for a weird type of attention. Have you spoke to him one-on-one about his lack of record?
     
  6. bbelton60

    bbelton60 Rookie

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    Mar 31, 2016

    Today he's telling a story about how supposedly someone brandished a gun at him because he "jacked his homie's phone" :rolleyes:
     
  7. Linguist92021

    Linguist92021 Phenom

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    Mar 31, 2016

    50% of my students are wanna-bees. The rest of the students are either real, true gangmembers or don't want to be one.
    I would also not call him out in front of the class, it would make him either shut down or retaliate, or make him happy because he's looking for attention.
    I would simply say: You need to stop talking and focus on your work. This is not school appropriate talk anyways, so it needs to stop immediately.

    I would call home, because if nothing in his records indicate such behavior, he is possibly at the beginning of becoming a gang-member. First they're fascinated by it, then they want to be it, but they have to be accepted by other. They will have to prove themselves, and before they can "put in any work", they will just talk themselves up trying to fit in, and be accepted. It is also possible that he's just trying to get attention and fit in, because he has no friends and is a loner.

    Look at who he is friends with. If it is the "wrong crowd" he's trying to impress them and may be swayed into that life style, Involve counselor and parents and let them know. If he has no friends, so it looks like he's trying to be all hard and tough, just talk to him, and to his parents. He might actually go as far as really wanting to do anything just to do fit in.

    I've seen quite a few loners, who were otherwise not bad kids at my school gone bad. It always started with impressing the others, trying to fit in and gain attention and talking all hard.
     
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  8. 2ndTimeAround

    2ndTimeAround Phenom

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    Mar 31, 2016

    I agree with calling home. But I might also speak to him privately and let him know you know the truth and caution him to be a bit more authentic.
     
  9. Special-t

    Special-t Enthusiast

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    Apr 1, 2016

    Persistany fabricating elaborate stories could be a sign of mental illness. I recommend referring him to the counselor or school psychologist.
     

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