How should kids be reading in guided reading?

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by Radical Dreamer, Jan 22, 2015.

  1. Radical Dreamer

    Radical Dreamer Rookie

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    Jan 22, 2015

    I understand the idea and purpose of guided reading when it was taught in my studies, but I was a little confused about how to actually do it during my student teaching.

    When I first did it, my guide teacher gave me the highest group in her second grade class, but told me to have them read the books independently, and then simply have guided reading as a discussion facilitated by me. I thought this was a little weird. The kids were able to read and understand the literal content of the books by themselves, but I still felt like there was something missing by having them not actually read during the group.

    When I tried guided reading with one of the lowest groups in this second grade class, many of those students had so much difficulty decoding that it was difficult even getting through a page if they were reading it out loud.

    I also watched a video on Youtube that showed a sample guided reading lesson. After the teacher did a picture walk of the book, she told the students to start reading, and they started reading out loud, independently. Their out-loud reading was not coordinated with each other. With this method, I thought it might be a little hard to clarify parts of the book with the whole group if they're all reading out loud independently.

    So going back to the original question, how should kids be reading during guided reading? Out loud? In their heads? Choral reading together? Stop after each page.

    I understand that this would vary based on age group and reading skill, but I'm not sure what to do for any particular age group or reading level.
     
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  3. miss-m

    miss-m Devotee

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    Jan 22, 2015

    It really depends on the level, age, skill you're working on, etc. With reading like you saw in the video, the kids are reading out loud so the teacher knows they're reading every word, and individually so they're going at their own pace (I'm guessing it was probably also a younger grade; some younger kids haven't perfected quiet reading yet and will get lost otherwise). Kids can whisper read so the teacher can have individual kids read louder to listen and do informal assessments of their reading. This is my favorite strategy because I can still hear everyone, but I'm not rushing or holding anyone back at the same time.
    Choral reading is good if you're working on something like fluency and they're repeating the way you said something, or -- I've done this before -- if some kids are sneaky and just don't read. ;) Or if you want them to really tune in to a certain part of a text, choral reading can be good there too.

    Older kids can read in their heads, but you want to make sure you have lots of comprehension questions so you know they're paying attention as they read silently.

    I would look into Fountas and Pinnell's guided reading stuff -- they have a lot of good stuff -- comprehension questions, info on leveled books, different strategies, etc.
     
  4. EMonkey

    EMonkey Connoisseur

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    Jan 22, 2015

    I usually do several different things. I do a walk through a lot of the time. I might do reading as a whole group choral read, then round robin in small groups, reading along through the story, and partner reading. Depends on the book and the group. I have them discuss the story, write about the story, hunt for unknown words, hunt for words that started hard and got easy, vocabulary word hunting, I have them write text to self stuff, I usually spend about three days on a story then on to the next.
     
  5. iteachbx

    iteachbx Enthusiast

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    Jan 24, 2015

    We don't do choral or round robin reading at my school. During guided reading with my lower groups the kids read independently. With my higher group, kids that are reading complicated chapter books on 4th, 5th and 6th grade level, they read the book ahead of time and then we discuss specific questions I gave them to think about when we meet. I guess you wouldn't really call this guided reading at this stage.
     
  6. waterfall

    waterfall Virtuoso

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    Jan 24, 2015

    Round robin is generally frowned upon. Choral reading seems to be the most "favored" way to read right now. I once worked in a school that would only let us do choral reading if kids were reading aloud. I tried to mix it up by having different groups read chorally (boys, girls, people with tennis shoes on, people with jeans on, etc.) so it wasn't so boring. Now that I work somewhere else, I still use choral reading sometimes but not exclusively. Sometimes I have kids turn to the person next to them and each read a page (or split one page in half). Other times I'll have kids read a page to themselves and tell them, "Be ready to tell me (comprehension question) when you're done reading." Other times I'll do whisper reading and have one kid specifically read to me so I can hear them better. Other times I'll read the page aloud and tell students to listen for a decoding mistake that I make (so they really have to pay attention and read along with me). I did that in my last observation and my P didn't like it, but I think it's a good activity so I still do it when she's not around! I usually stop to discuss after each page or 2, depending on how long the pages are.
     
  7. yellowdaisies

    yellowdaisies Fanatic

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    Jan 24, 2015

    It varies SO much by grade level/ability! Have you read The Next Step in Guided Reading by Jan Richardson? That book is fantastic and helped me SO much in first grade.

    In first grade, I used to have them whisper read (staggered start times) so I could hear each student reading. I would occasionally choral read certain passages, usually after they had a chance to whisper read. Sometimes I would have them buddy read, especially in the higher groups.

    In fifth grade, they come to me after having read certain chapters. It's a comprehension discussion. I ask them questions and they discuss themes, character change, plot points, etc. I do have a few kids in fifth who need to work on fluency, but I do that in individual conferences, not in a small group.

    It depends on the needs of the students.
     
  8. WarriorPrncss

    WarriorPrncss Companion

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    Feb 7, 2015

    I'm not sure if this helps... but where I am student teaching I take the lowest 2nd grade reading group during their reading time (usually 5 children). We sit at a table together and each child reads a page and they help each other if they get stuck, I encourage them as well.

    Also, because they are a very low group I'll start them off by looking at the picture on the page and talking about what is in it. That way, they have an idea of what will be on the page and have clues if they reach a word they aren't sure about.

    Afterward we talk about what happened in the book and what the theme was and what "clues" were in the book to help us find the theme.
     
  9. Mr. Nobody

    Mr. Nobody Rookie

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    Feb 17, 2015

    Here is how I do guiding reading:

    1. Give each child a copy of the book, have them put their tracking finger under the title and read it with me.

    2. Each child takes a picture walk on their own.

    3. I ask the children to share with each other, then with me what they saw.

    4. We take a picture walk together and I draw the student's attention to words I suspect they will have trouble with. We briefly discuss strategies to help us figure out new words.

    5. The students read the story independently 3 - 4 times at their own speed. I listen as they read, help as needed, praise, reinforce good reading behaviors, etc.

    6. I acknowledge positive reading behaviors, then ask the students comprehension questions about the story.

    7. I give the students something to work on independently at their seats that involves the story then call up the next group.
     
  10. UditGanguly

    UditGanguly Rookie

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    Mar 18, 2015

    Guided reading is an instructional approach that involves a teacher. working with a small group of students who demonstrate similar reading behaviors and can all read similar levels of texts. The text is easy enough for students to read with your skillful support.
     
  11. ChildWhisperer

    ChildWhisperer Groupie

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    Jun 30, 2015

    For anyone in the future who wants to know how to do reading with a younger group (Pre-K), I read the book out loud and then ask them comprehension questions at the end. I usually read the entire story before asking questions (the kids did amazingly)
    The other Pre-K class had to stop after each page to ask questions since they were at a lower level.
     
  12. CFClassroom

    CFClassroom Connoisseur

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    Jul 3, 2015

    If you are not required to do guided reading I would suggest using a workshop model with 1:1 conferencing. My experiences have been that this progresses them quicker. :) Jodi
     

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