How others view us

Discussion in 'Substitute Teachers' started by CD1980, Feb 12, 2010.

  1. CD1980

    CD1980 Rookie

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    Feb 12, 2010

    I've been wondering about this, lately.... How do you think others in the school system, especially teachers, view us as substitute teachers? Do you think they see us as colleagues or babysitters? Do they respect us or assume we're basically clueless? When we report misbehaviors in the classroom, do they figure we just don't know how to control a class? What are your opinions, based on your own experiences?
     
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  3. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Feb 12, 2010

    It depends on the substitute...I wouldn't make a generalization about all subs...there are the good, the great and the not so good (and the never let this person back in my classroom type :mad:) They are not colleagues but they should not be merely babysitters...my students are not babies. I hope my subs are responsible and reliable. I respect those who earn my respect. Some misbehaviors that are reported are 'the usual', some are due to having a sub in the room , and some are due to lack of skill in managing behaviors-depends on the sub - I welcome feedback from the sub regarding how the day went but I'll form my own opinion on that based on how well the plans were followed, what my students say, what my colleagues say (they notice)....I love when one of the great subs is scheduled for me, I know my kids and classroom are in good hands. When I have a new, unknown sub who does a good job, I let the office know. When I have a sub who does a bad job, I let the office know that too...I also sometimes request to NOT have certain subs back..
    As a sub, make yourself indispensible. Show up on time, follow the plans, be resourceful. You won't have to worry what the 'teachers' think if you are doing a great job- they'll request you. Your reputation depends on your own actions.
     
  4. msmullenjr

    msmullenjr Devotee

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    Feb 12, 2010

    I've always considered subs colleagues. There are a few out there that i barely see as employable, but they are few and far between. I have great respect for subs because, unlike a full time teacher, they need to gain the respect and attention of a new batch of kids each day. I know that different subs have their strengths and weaknesses, but so do teachers.:D
     
  5. Special-t

    Special-t Enthusiast

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    Feb 12, 2010

    I get a lot of support and smiles from regular teachers and administration. Recently, at a pretty rough school, a librarian actually said, "God bless you for being here."
     
  6. Ms. I

    Ms. I Maven

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    Feb 13, 2010

    I think they view us as some of both. Unless they know certain subs personally, then they may never know how capable & talented certain subs are. I think overall though, subs are respected for the most part.
     
  7. Cerek

    Cerek Aficionado

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    Feb 13, 2010

    I've been treated with respect by the teachers I've subbed for, as well as the principals and secretaries of the schools I've gone too.

    I had some problems with a certain group at one middle school last year and worried that it reflected badly on me for lack of management skills, but then the P came in and basically gave the entire class a good blasting for their behavior. They knew they had a sub and, instead of a handful acting out, a large portion of the class fed into the behavior. I spoke to the secretary and P afterwards and they assured me they didn't view the incident as a reflection on me - it was completely on the kids for the way they were acting.

    At the beginning of this semester, I went back to a principal I had subbed for before to ask if my name was still on their list. She said "Yes, as a matter of fact, we were just discussing subs this morning and your name came up." I told her I was concerned that my name might have been taken off the list since I did my student teaching during the first half of the year and had not been available. She said "No, your name hasn't been removed. You come when we call you, you show up on time, you follow the lesson plans and you're good with the kids. That's what we look for in our subs."

    I think that, as long as you follow those guidelines, you should have no problem earning the respect of the teachers.
     
  8. Toak

    Toak Cohort

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    Feb 13, 2010

    I think it also depends on the teacher in question. And obviously, if I'm being sent to sub in an area outside of my certification, the teacher isn't going to see me as equally capable. The first time I subbed in Sp. Ed. the teacher was in the room (made me a whole lot more nervous), but I spoke with her after a few classes to find out just what I should do. The next time I subbed in a different special ed room, I heard her telling someone that she taught me how to do everything I needed to be a good teacher

    I've had teachers that have helped me while I struggled (for uncontrollable reasons my teaching education was horrific and so I learned how to teach from subbing, not school). And I've had teachers that come into the room unannounced, change situations that I've corrected back to the original problem, and then leave. Which is really frustrating when you are subbing in a school that the teacher will be surprised to see you've got two lessons finished, its the beginning of the day and you've just gotten the entire class to listen and participate, only to have someone come in and change everything because "that's not how it usually is." And sometimes the things are relatively minor too, like moving a girl across the room who will act up for attention the entire time if she is left in her usual seat - and detentions and discipline reports will not effect the behavior
     
  9. swansong1

    swansong1 Virtuoso

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    Feb 13, 2010

    As teachers, we pass on info to each other about subs. The good ones are lauded and recommended to each other. They are given the utmost respect and treated as peers. Unfortunately, it is not the same for the subs who, time and time again, don't handle the children well or refuse to follow the lesson plans and choose to do their own thing. Those subs eventually become what is known in our district as the warm bodies. They will only be called if there is absolutely no one else available and I have seen some of them treated pretty disrespectfully by some teachers.
     
  10. WhatchaDoin?

    WhatchaDoin? Comrade

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    Feb 19, 2010

    As a sub, I worry about the same thing. Every time I leave a job, there is always something I would have done differently. Not necessarily major events, but things I still would like to change. I always wonder if these are glaring mistakes.

    The teachers have all been kind. When I think I need help, I do ask. I always wonder how that is perceived. I get compliments, but I always wonder if they are sincere. Again, these are very kind people...

    As a teacher, I was always thankful for the subs in my room. I tried to leave clear plans and all needed materials neatly organized. Things weren't always done exactly the way I would have done them, but objectives were usually met. I did hear some teachers negatively discuss a couple subs. One sub. ran to admin. with teacher/classroom routine shortcomings. The other sub left detailed notes to the teachers as to how they could improve their daily lessons and routines.
     
  11. oldstudent

    oldstudent Comrade

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    Feb 20, 2010

    I doubt teachers concern themselves much with forming opinions on subs, unless they need one long term. They have too much else to thing about.
    The same can be said for principals and administrators.
     
  12. YoungTeacherGuy

    YoungTeacherGuy Phenom

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    Feb 20, 2010

    There are good subs and bad subs, just like there are good teachers and bad teachers!

    I respect the people who sub for me. In fact, because of all the layoffs here in California, many of the subs are fully credentialed teachers!

    Because I am a former substitute teacher, I truly appreciate what substitute teachers do!
     
  13. myownwoman

    myownwoman Habitué

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    Feb 22, 2010

    Substitutes helps keep the school moving.
     
  14. webmistress

    webmistress Devotee

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    Feb 22, 2010

    Thankfully, same here.
     
  15. Toak

    Toak Cohort

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    Feb 23, 2010

    And substitutes that are poor in one grade may be excellent in another. Substituting helped me find my niche and made me realize I should not teach kindergarten - now if I could just convince the subbing lady of that..I believe she eventually clued in to the fact that i'd never accept a kindergarten job because I'd end up showing up for something only to be told "we need you in kindergarten instead of here" I've gotten a lot better at kindergarten but I still hate teaching it and have yet to spend a day in kindergarten without having a headache at the end of it. And though I enjoy fifth grade, i don't want anything to do with 6th graders - they are just like giant kindergartners. Third and fourth grade teachers are always amazed by me and praise me highly. Kindergarten teachers know I struggle and try to avoid subbing for them, though I suspect one always requests me since I've had kids from a few years tell me I was their only sub in kindergarten (I'd rather not hear that...)


    Of course I didn't know it until after I stopped subbing, but I think my main problem in kindergarten is related to a disability that effects my temporal lobe, making it difficult and sometimes impossible to function while there is alot of background noise going on. And kindergarten kids are noisy throughout a large portion of the day

    Before I started subbing I thought I would love kindergarten. i'm glad I didn't seek a job right away though, because I could have easily accepted K or 6 not realizing how that would effect my mental and emotional well being.
     
  16. mrachelle87

    mrachelle87 Fanatic

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    Feb 23, 2010

    It depends on the sub. Most I consider a very important part of our faculty. I am so glad they are willing to do a job that is underpaid and not always appreciated. I do have a few that I don't respect. I usually give them a couple chances before I make a judgement.
     
  17. webmistress

    webmistress Devotee

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    Feb 23, 2010

    Toak
    I'd end up showing up for something only to be told "we need you in kindergarten instead of here"

    Things like that almost totally turned me off to subbing. Sign up for one job only to be told you'll be working another grade level. Grade level is important. If it's a 'rough and tough' school with a lot of behavioral problems, I'm sorry but I can no longer take 4th or 5th grade. I've put up with the abuse and threats long enough.

    Yes, I can get the kids quiet. But it takes so much mental and emotional energy to keep things under control, I skip those jobs when I see them online...or if I get a call, I have to turn it down.

    If I showed up for 2nd grade at a rough school, and they told me I'd have 5th...I'd be really nervous. There's a huge difference.

    K-3 is not easier, it's just different. And that's a difference that suits my personality better. Thankfully, I haven't been switched around in a long time.
     
  18. Toak

    Toak Cohort

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    My first two days ever of subbing were the two classrooms in a rough and tumble school that no other sub was willing to teach. I didn't know that at the time though and I was ending the day thinking "What the hell is wrong with me that I can't control these kids or teach the lessons?" Later i had many days of hall roaming at the school and realized that their regular teachers had all those problems (and in one case it seemed to be the regular teacher always had less control than I did). Good thing I stuck around long enough to find that out rather than give up on trying to teach
     
  19. John Lee

    John Lee Groupie

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    I agree, that for the most part, individual teachers respect you. As for administration/district level, we are one-step above the french fry cooker at Burger King in their eyes.
     
  20. Tried&True

    Tried&True New Member

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    Mar 16, 2010

    i wouldn't spend my energy worrying about what they think of me. it gives people way too much power. they can think whatever they want to, because they are entltled to their own thought processes. as long as you are doing your job, then why does it matter what they think? itheir thoughts will not add more money to my check, food on my table or clothes on my back. i promise you, they don't care what you think about them. be positive, do your job and take the money. it's about the kids, not their thoughts!
     

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