How often do you progress monitor for IEP goals?

Discussion in 'Special Education' started by waterfall, Jul 24, 2013.

  1. waterfall

    waterfall Maven

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    Jul 24, 2013

    In my first position I used to progress monitor every Friday. It was very time consuming since most students had goals outside of the basic one minute ORF or 3 minute MAZE. Our math tests were 8 minutes, some kids had writing goals about writing paragraphs, etc. and some had reading comprehension goals where they would have to retell a story or answer short answer questions. I got a lot of data and made sure to chart it for each student. However, this took up my entire instructional time on Fridays. I had to wonder if it wouldn't be more beneficial for the students to get that extra day of instruction rather than being so focused on data- when you add up all of those days, that's a ton of missed time!

    I know that a lot of other teachers in the district would only progress monitor maybe once a month or only when we "had to" (for report cards, and to check before/after breaks to see if they qualified for ESY). I know the expectation for our RtI kids was always once a week, but that's because we needed all of that data to get them into sped if it turned out they needed it. If they're already in, is it a waste to collect so much? As far as using the data, it was helpful to me to see the charts over time, but when you work so closely with students you know how they're progressing anyway. On the other hand, I had students keep track on a sticker chart and that was extremely motivational to them. Is there a "right" way to do this?
     
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  3. FourSquare

    FourSquare Fanatic

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    Jul 24, 2013

    No!

    I do not obsessively progress monitor. Do I assess my children daily? Yes. Am I aware of their strengths and weaknesses? Yes. However, I took all that charting down too only to have NOBODY care about it or look at it. IEP report cards are a joke.

    I am moving towards formally assessing goals once a month. But I have a 0 pressure admin. If they were up my butt about it I would do more.
     
  4. Preschool0929

    Preschool0929 Cohort

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    Jul 24, 2013

    This is something that I struggle with and I'm hoping to figure out a better system this year...

    We're required to monitor weekly. Out weekly data has to be entered into our online system every 2 weeks. All the other Spec. Ed. Teachers have been there for a while and most only formally assess goals once a month, but I've been too nervous to do that, since it's only my 2nd year.

    Ugh...
     
  5. BumbleB

    BumbleB Habitué

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    Jul 24, 2013

    This is something I definitely want to improve, but I have yet to find a "user friendly way" to progress monitor. With the day-to-day chaos of teaching, the last thing on my mind is, "Ohmigosh, that's an IEP goal for one of my 20 kids!"

    Like waterfall said, my kids usually have IEP goals that can't be assessed in a short probe. Therefore, I have to constantly be alert to any and all classroom activities/assignments that I can "count" towards progress monitoring.

    I'm eagerly awaiting more advice...I suck at data collection lol.
     
  6. bella84

    bella84 Aficionado

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    Jul 24, 2013

    I, too, struggle with this and am looking for a better system.

    It really seems to depend on what the goal is.... For behavior goals that are monitored through an observation, I aim for once every two weeks, sometimes more, sometimes less. Another teacher told me that she does once per quarter. I don't feel that's enough, but maybe I'm just over-thinking it. For reading, writing, and math goals, I aimed for every Friday, but I also felt that it wasted tons of instructional time that my kids needed.

    Luckily, I don't have to turn in data to anyone, and I only have to report on the quarterly IEP goal progress reports. I would really like to get a good system going this year though. I just don't know what that system is. Maybe someone will come along with an answer soon....
     
  7. karebear76

    karebear76 Habitué

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    Jul 24, 2013

    I would like to do weekly or every two weks, but reality is that I get it done at interim and end of quarter. Then I'm rushing for state mandated reports. It takes me at least a week to check my whole class. I've tried using Fridays, but it forces my lessons to be contrived at times. I try to plan lessons thay will produce data as much as possible. I'm hoping we'll get our new super to change our district's interim policy so I won't have to report every 4.5 weeks. It seems I spend so much time assessing, my students aren't ever learning skills to allow them to make progress.
     
  8. teachersk

    teachersk Connoisseur

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    Jul 25, 2013

    I currently teach (and have always taught) in a more severe setting, so it's much different than a resource room or inclusion setting.

    However, I am always reminded by some information I got at a training many moons ago:

    If progress is monitored...... Then effectiveness may.....

    Daily, as a part of instruction.....be determined within 2 weeks
    Twice a week..... be determined within a month
    Weekly......be determined within a quarter
    Quarterly......not be determined even after a year

    This comes from "An Administrator's Guide to Measuring Achievement for Students with IEPs."

    In my classroom, each kid has a clipboard. We work directly on IEP goals in a 1:1 or 1:2 setting (that's why I said this probably wouldn't work for other settings) - and data is collected on each goal at least 2x a week, but usually 3-4x per week. This allows us to consistently move forward and choose new objectives for each student. My kids move "fast" compared to programs I taught in where data was sparsely collected.

    Just something to think about! I know most people think the data is for "someone else to look at..." - but it's really for you! How do you know you're effectively teaching without watching/monitoring the data! I constantly make adjustments to my students' programming based on the data we collect. Not a soul looks at my data, but I use it for IEP meetings, to show parents the kids' progress, and for my own information. For example, I had one kid who could not for the life of him get past 9 when counting. We made modifications and used a visual cue for him when counting past 9. This way, he started to move forward with his counting skills instead of staying stuck on 9. Just an example.

    I recently found an awesome app for data collection called IEPpal if anyone is interested. It makes it pretty easy to input and monitor. Saves a lot of time and paperwork. It costs $95 for a year but it is well worth the cost, in my opinion.
     
  9. teachersk

    teachersk Connoisseur

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    Jul 25, 2013

    I would also recommend apps like Bitsboard and programs like ScootPad, Kahn Academy, etc. to help with digital data collection, when possible. If your school has subscriptions to any programs that include progress monitoring, I would consider checking into this to take one thing off the to do list!

    Also, non-conventional methods such as folders for students that include probes for all of their skills, giving them worksheets to turn in (even a worksheet or written piece of evidence can be scored and used as data collection).

    It is definitely something that took me many years to perfect... I was not a stellar data collector until 2 years ago or so.
     
  10. Proud2BATeacher

    Proud2BATeacher Phenom

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    Jul 25, 2013

    I monitor all goals daily and I collect behavior data daily (my students all have severe behaviours). I collect academic data at least 2 times a week.
     
  11. Lisabobisa

    Lisabobisa Companion

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    Jul 25, 2013

    I've always had it written into the IEP. Example: "So and so will read 106 words per minute with 95% accuracy on a 4th grade level fluency probe given biweekly" so because it was written the IEP I usually follow what that says whether its weekly, biweekly, monthly, or quarterly.
     
  12. ZoomZoomZOOM

    ZoomZoomZOOM Devotee

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    Jul 25, 2013

    I try to PM every OTHER Friday - so twice per month. One Friday I'll do math, and the other Friday I'll do reading. Works out pretty well.

    Most of my PM is DIBELS.
     
  13. mopar

    mopar Multitudinous

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    Jul 25, 2013

    I would definitely look at the goals and decide what has to be done independently and what you can use instructional time to monitor. When I was in special education I worked with my regular education teachers to help with progress monitoring. I would have them give different assignments throughout the week as a warm up and then collect them from my students (or just hand me a stack and I would grade them).

    As a regular education teacher, I would incorporate the progress monitoring into my daily routine. We would vary our math warm up so that it could be used to progress monitor. For example, on Mondays I would give the students 10 fraction problems (one student had a goal of 8 out of 10 correct on mixed fraction problems), on Tuesdays we focused on math facts, on Wednesday we did a few word problems, etc.

    I also did a weekly 3 minute write with all my students. This helped my special education teacher because she could just collect each student's notebook for data. I would also keep all drafts of the writing process so that she had it for data time. She could just come in and grab a student's folder to access all their writing throughout the year.
     
  14. bella84

    bella84 Aficionado

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    Jul 25, 2013

    Thanks for sharing this. I'm now realizing that I've probably overlooked many opportunities to use work the students are doing in the regular classroom for data collection. I'll have to see how I can do a better job of incorporating it this year.
     
  15. mopar

    mopar Multitudinous

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    Jul 26, 2013

    A great way to get some of your regular education teachers to help you is to remind that they may need data for a student that they want to qualify for special education. If they begin day one keeping the data that you need for your students, then they will also have the data for any student who may need to qualify throughout the year.

    Keeping all the writing and math warm ups of all my students has helped me, as a regular education teacher, to help students to receive services much more quickly because I had multiple data points over time to show.
     

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