How much time off in summer?

Discussion in 'Teacher Time Out' started by Ima Teacher, May 6, 2019.

  1. Ima Teacher

    Ima Teacher Maven

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    How long is your summer break? As in, how many free weekdays do you have during the summer?

    I always hear non-teachers talk about how it must be nice to get three months off in the summer and get paid in the summer for not working. (The summer pay is a whole other thread, so we will stick with days off.)

    I counted today. When I remove PD days and other work-required days, I have 36 weekdays of summer. And I’ll have to take a couple of those to get my room ready. Even more if I decide to paint my classroom.
     
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  3. teacherintexas

    teacherintexas Maven

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    I get six weeks off.

    But the general public also complains that we don’t say the pledge, that we do not teach cursive, and have to take out analog clocks because our kids don’t get taught how to read them. . Non-teachers have no clue about what goes on.

    We also get comments about how we need to take Common Core out of our classrooms. Texas has never had CC. Parents look flabbergasted when we tell them this at conferences.
     
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  4. otterpop

    otterpop Aficionado

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    I get about seven weeks.
     
  5. agdamity

    agdamity Fanatic

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    We have ten weeks from the last day of one contract until the first day of the next. However, in that time, we have six days of required professional development. I am also teaching summer school this year, so that shortens my break considerably. I only have three weeks with zero commitments this year.
     
  6. otterpop

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    Is that in your contact? Is it something your school provides or plans for you, or do you choose what to go to?
     
  7. Ima Teacher

    Ima Teacher Maven

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    Our PD days are part of our contract. Some years the district or school decides the PD. Other times we find our own. This year we are doing three days provided by the district/school, and my DH and I are doing one together. (He’s in a different district.)

    When we have extra PD days, sometimes we get paid for them, but usually not. Of course, we can choose not to do them. One year I had enough extra PD hours that I was able to count them in place of a schedule staff work day when I was out for surgery so I didn’t have to use a sick day.
     
  8. whizkid

    whizkid Cohort

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    9 weeks
     
  9. waterfall

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    We have about 11 weeks off- I just counted and it's 58 week days. Teachers do go back about a week before students for required PD and work days, so students get 12 weeks. The district usually offers one or two things in the summer, but it's not mandatory and you're paid for attending. I would go just for the money, but it's always geared only toward classroom teachers.

    I never go in early to set up my room. We get two work days before students start and that is plenty for me. I don't do any fancy decorating- just organize things, hang up a few posters, and put borders/bulletin board paper up. The actual content of the bulletin boards is either anchor charts or student work.

    I've also posted before that trying to do any sort of "work ahead" in the summer is a waste of time in my school/district because they're always changing things. You'd just end up having to redo everything once you found out what the "new big things" are at back to school PD.

    I am considering taking some online classes to move up on the salary scale, since I won't be working at all this summer. I'm waiting to see how contract negotiations shake out to see if it's worth it. One of things they were supposedly talking about is making the lanes smaller, like in 15 credit increments instead of the 20 they are now. On the off chance that succeeded, I would only need 9 credits to move up to the next lane.

    ETA: I personally feel that the extensive time off is a benefit to the job that teachers need to acknowledge. Besides the 11 weeks in the summer, I get a week at Thanksgiving, at least 2 full weeks at Christmas, a week at spring break, and several 3 day weekends throughout the year. I do think some of it balances out with the fact that teachers have to be "on" all day long, which is rare in other salaried professions, and we're also not typically compensated for time worked outside of the contract day. I work pretty close to contract time- I always figure if I'm not going to get the benefit of a decent salary, then I'm certainly going to take the benefit of tons of time off. A lot of what I see teachers at my school spending "extra" time on is totally unnecessary stuff that is their choice to do.
     
    Last edited: May 6, 2019
  10. MissCeliaB

    MissCeliaB Aficionado

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    We have 57 work days off.
     
  11. Aces

    Aces Habitué

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    Students will end up having 11 weeks off (school starts on a Tuesday), classroom teachers will 10 (they go back a week before for pd/classroom set up/new teacher orientation/etc). I'll get three weeks, which starts three weeks after everybody else (this was ironed down this week). The admin/guidance team leaves after everyone else and comes back early in order to finish one school year and start another. But that's fine, I've got stuff planned for those three weeks off!
     
  12. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    9 weeks.
     
  13. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Aficionado

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    I don’t do professional development during the summers unless I want to. However, I do have two PD days during the school year that I am contracted to do (staff days where no students come to school).

    During the summer, I get 73 days off (~2.5 months or ~11 weeks).
     
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  14. TrademarkTer

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    I'm guessing this is no more, given your new administrative position. I've never known an administrator who gets more than a week or two off in the summer in any district.
     
  15. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Aficionado

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    I expected the same thing, but my principal said that I will still have about the same summer break as before because my predecessors were able to get everything done during the school year and so there is no reason that that should change. I was quite pleased to hear that because I dreaded losing my summer break. The only thing he said that I may have to do is return like a week early and end the school year a couple days later, which I totally don’t mind! :D
     
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  16. Backroads

    Backroads Aficionado

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    I went and checked. 11 weeks, not a single day I'm required to do anything (though there are several summer PD offerings...)
     
  17. Backroads

    Backroads Aficionado

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    So those of you [non-administrators] who do have required days in the middle of the summer, how does that look on contract? In my case, I am literally off-contract.
     
  18. Backroads

    Backroads Aficionado

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    I personally have no qualms about admitting the breaks are a big perk of being a teacher, nor will I apologize for them.

    I will, however, correct a common issue I hear of "paid for breaks". In my situation, we are not paid for summer, nor any of the breaks. It could be argued that I am being paid such-n-such for less than a year of work, but I have found some people are very bothered by the idea we are specifically being paid for breaks.
     
  19. swansong1

    swansong1 Virtuoso

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    If I was still going to work, I would have had 80 work days off this summer.
     
  20. Aces

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    I love how you have to specify "non-administrators", haha! I mean it's definitely a warranted destination!
     
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  21. agdamity

    agdamity Fanatic

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    Yes, it is in our contract. We do not get a choice in it, but the district does provide it. This year, we have two extra days because of a new state initiative that requires specific training in order to keep our license. We will get a stipend for those two extra days in June 2020.
     
  22. otterpop

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    I don't work in the summer but our contracts are for one full year.
     
  23. Ima Teacher

    Ima Teacher Maven

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    This is why we do our PD for next year at the end of the school year. That way we have all summer to work on the right stuff.
     
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  24. waterfall

    waterfall Maven

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    How does that work for new teachers? Do they do it all again for them at the beginning of the next school year? That just seems like an odd set up to me.
     
  25. MntnHiker

    MntnHiker Rookie

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    I get about ten weeks off. I don't do any work or PD in the summer. We have two PD days before the students come back, and I get my room ready in those two days. I relish my summers off; it is a perk of the job and I don't feel guilty about taking that time and enjoying it.
     
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  26. Ima Teacher

    Ima Teacher Maven

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    We generally hire before the school year ends, so they can attend summer PD. When they are hired later, we have to fill them in on things through our PLC work. We don’t have a lot of turnover, so it isn’t usually a problem.
     
  27. whizkid

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    What type of training is that? That really caught my attention.
     
  28. agdamity

    agdamity Fanatic

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    Arkansas has an initiative called RISE that focuses on the science of teaching reading. All elementary certified teachers are required to receive training and demonstrate profiency to keep their licenses. There are multiple pathways to show profiency, and it is up to each district to determine how to help their teachers meet the requirements. There is a large section devoted to RISE on the state department of education webpage if you’d like more information.
     
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  29. TrademarkTer

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    This is smart. Our district likes to spring this stuff on us when we have kids coming in the very next day.
     
  30. runsw/scissors

    runsw/scissors Phenom

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    9 weeks. I have to report back Aug. 5
     
  31. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Aficionado

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    I’m jealous. My summer break is only 2.5 months long.

    Edit: I misread your post. I thought you said 3 months and not 9 weeks for some reason...
     
    Last edited: Jun 2, 2019
  32. bella84

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    We have roughly nine weeks off this year (nine full weeks, plus an extra Friday and Monday). It should have been 10 weeks off, but we had to go an extra week due to snow days.

    Some teachers voluntarily teach summer school, attend PD, or participate in curriculum writing over the summer, but it's not required. Anyone who participates is compensated accordingly, and no one is forced to do any of the work. I'll attend PD sessions when they are of interest to me and directly applicable to my work, but otherwise I take my summers for me. I might opt to read professional books, take a class, or prepare for the next year in my own way, but that's all by choice.

    I should also mention that we are required to do home visits over the summer (or as late as during the first month of school) to get to know our incoming students and families, but we can set our own schedule for that and get compensated for our time. I prefer to do it before we are required to be back at work so that I'm not as stressed and pressed for time, but some teachers wait until our first contract day back before doing any home visits.
     
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  33. bella84

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    Isn't 2.5 months longer than 9 weeks? I also get nine weeks off, and it's only two months. It's basically the first week of June through until the first full week of August. 2.5 months would be longer.
     
  34. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Aficionado

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    Oh wow, I read her post as 3 months. I don’t know why. And you would be correct, 2.5 months is longer.
     

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