How much talking is TOO much talking....

Discussion in 'Behavior Management' started by trayums, Apr 8, 2008.

  1. trayums

    trayums Enthusiast

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    Apr 8, 2008

    I feel like I'm not tolerant enough of my first graders talking and behavior. I seem to forget that they are 6 and 7 years old sometimes. I guess my question is, how much do YOUR kids talk and what do you find to be "normal" amount of chatter? I just dont' know if I am setting them up to go crazy in second grade when their teacher isn't as tolerant of the chatter... does that make sense? Any ideas/thoughts are great appreciated!:D
     
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  3. cheeryteacher

    cheeryteacher Enthusiast

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    I generally do not like talking, but I have become more lenient to allow small chatter when passing out papers, and similar transitions. But when it's time to get back to work the talking better stop immediately. As long as they respect whatever boundaries the teacher has set forth they should be fine.
     
  4. TulipsGirl

    TulipsGirl Cohort

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    Apr 8, 2008

    It depends on your teaching style, I think.
    Personally, I have found background noise to be very distracting to me, even outside of the school setting. So if a student with a quite voice (I've got lots of them) is trying to talk to me and there is a soft murmer in the background from other students, it's hard for me to hear, and it's very frustrating. Same thing with squeaky desktops. And it's rude for students to carry on their own convo while their classmate is asking a question or making a comment. So absolutely no talking during that time. No talking while a student is reading aloud. No talking during a spelling test. That's a lot of "no"s.
    So.... with that in mind I try to give them times where they may talk to each other - during group work, or partner reading. As long as they stay on topic and they use quite voices. You must teach them what a quiet voice is, if you want them to use one.
    I also like to let them earn free time, where they can talk to each other, color, read.
     
  5. Proud2BATeacher

    Proud2BATeacher Phenom

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    When it starts getting on my nerves :)!
     
  6. PowerTeacher

    PowerTeacher Comrade

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    Apr 8, 2008

    You might consider setting an acceptable level of conversation at the beginning of each class. Check out Power Noise Control for ideas on that.

    Also, you can train them to give you their attention instantly, and with a smile. Check out "Class!-Yes!"
     
  7. TulipsGirl

    TulipsGirl Cohort

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    Proud,
    That was my first thought! :agreed:
     
  8. Master Pre-K

    Master Pre-K Virtuoso

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    1. when conversation becomes so deep, you are listening..and forget this is a 6-7 year old... or in my case 4 year old!!

    So, my mom, she, like got mad at my sister and put her out, and her boyfriend came banging on the door, and we thru her clothes out the window, cause hey..last time he came bustin' thru the door after her, and we don't know what to do...


    nip that in the bud. "That is too bad about your sister, tell me more about your picture."

    2. when they don't breathe between words!

    so, my mom, and sister, and me, and cousins,we went,to the store, yeah, we, me mom...

    ask them to tell you why, predict, explain... (which stops them from talking and causes them to think!)

    3. when the work doesn't add up to the brain power

    "Mary, I know this is not your best work. Please do it over me, and this time, no talking to your neighbor."

    4. yeah, and like Proud says... :p

    cut off the lights and have some D.E.A.R., drop everything and read or the technical term, SST Sustained Silent Reading time... To be effective, you must model behavior. Get a book, and refuse to respond to anything but blood or other body fluids! When princpal looks in, say nothing. Don't even look up when they tell you, unless this busybody comes up to your desk. If they haven't figured out what you are doing by then, the ball is in your court.

    "We are improve reading comprehension scores by engaging in silent reading."

    Watch for the dumb look on their face as they slowly leave your class.

    Nobody will know your little secret!
     
  9. blessedhands

    blessedhands Comrade

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    Apr 9, 2008

    Develop selective hearing. Not everything you need to address.

    However, I dislike talking. I allow some chatter as long as its respectful or on the lesson while doing group work or personal work, but I am intolerable of side chatter while I am lecturing/giving the lesson.

    The students know the deal with me so side chattering is not done unless I allow it.
     
  10. MrsMikesell

    MrsMikesell Cohort

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    I really feel that talking is vital to their language development.

    My students do not have conversations at home, so I have to let them learn those skills during school.

    My day is pretty much all hands-on, we don't do worksheets, so I let my kids talk all day.

    When I'm "teaching" is the only no talking time, otherwise, they talk all day.

    In my room, even independent reading is NOT quiet. Kids get excited and talk about books. I just feel that's fine. When I'm reading, I talk about it with my husband, the kids should be able to do the same thing.


    Kelly :)
     
  11. synapse

    synapse Comrade

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    Apr 9, 2008

    Kids need to talk. Consider the developmental needs of first graders.

    If it interferes with teaching, it is a discipline problem.
    If it interferes with the learning of the class it is a discipline problem.

    If it is a discipline problem, you need to correct it without becoming the source of a further discipline problem yourself. In other words, if everything comes to a halt to deal with the problem, YOU have created a new discipline problem.

    If it simply gets on your nerves, it is probably your problem.
     
  12. teacheratheart

    teacheratheart Companion

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    I am pretty lenient with the talking in my classroom. It just doesn't bother me as long as it is a quiet talk. It kind of drives my aide nuts at times and I have had my principal comment on it in one of her evaluations about me. But I just don't mind a low hum in my classroom. But I am the oldest of 7 kids and I think that may be part of it. It was never quiet in our house.
     
  13. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    Apr 9, 2008

    I was asked in an interview once, "What would I hear if I walked past your classroom?" The answer, "students talking". My room is rarely quiet. I find that students learn best when they are able to talk with each other about what they are learning and doing. They are encouraged to discuss their thoughts, ideas, questions and difficulties. There are, of course, a few times when they aren't able to talk--when I am teaching a lesson, when someone else is talking during a group discussion, and during a test.

    By the way...I got the job.
     
  14. Master Pre-K

    Master Pre-K Virtuoso

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    ok, but what about supposedly adult students in a college class, during discussions, and others are having sidebar conversations??? :confused:

    I think this is rude. I am old-school, and believe the instructor should politely tell them to shush! As we say, "Nobody was talking when you were talking to us."

    Although, I also agree that some chatter is productive...and I have seen movement, or alternate seating...kids outside in the hall, under my desk, sitting on the windowsill ledge...other bizarre places, doing some really good work!

    and...I am also just getting old! I know when too much pre-k chatter is annoying me, I need to step out the room. If I come back and feel better, that's good. If I don't, that means I must take off tomorrow!

    if it continues...time for a career change...

    that' is why I could not work with 2s. I can't have kids crying all day. Crying after they are fed, clean, and not hurt, just bust out crying, AFTER you pick them up. Crying in my ears!!! You know, that take a deep breath, pause...and... uh, uh.... WAAAAAAA!!!!

    can't do 2s... :unsure:
     
  15. Loomistrout

    Loomistrout Devotee

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    Apr 10, 2008

    Both Far West Labs and backed up with same statistics from Fred Jones' research found "talking to neighbors" accounted for 80% of disruptions in the typical non-problem classroom. Out of seat accounted for 15% while playing with objects took up remaining 5%.

    Bottom line for teachers to consider is the cost of undirected talking. Undirected talking can increase teacher stress. Being on one's toes all day long making management decisions -- "Hey, you two back there. Can you keep it down?" - "That's too noisy class" - "Remember what we said about 12" voices?" -- day after day can make one exhausted while obliterating the medicine cabinet. Undirected talking reduces time on task. It's just darn hard to concentrate on a difficult piece of work when someone is babbling away in your ear if not making a competitive indoor sport out of the gift of gab.
     
  16. jw13

    jw13 Groupie

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    It also depends on the age level of the class. You may find more of a "hum" with the lower grades. Most of the noise I had in my classrooms was from students just talking outloud to themselves, or when reading(silent reading wasn't always easy for students). I didn't mind directed task talking, but my students understood when talking wasn't appropriate. But, if you walked by my room, more often than not there was a "hum," which I don't consider is necessarily talking noise.
     
  17. Master Pre-K

    Master Pre-K Virtuoso

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    I also think today's kids being products of today's parents are more accoustomed to multi-tasking, and can work very well with distractions...even though we can't! Computers constantly popping up windows and sounds while they learn and play. Life is one big video game. One sound is too boring to them. They talk to entertain themselves.

    I worked for a customer service call center office, and the training was soo crazy. The co-workers talked every minute! there would be lectures, hands on, and demonstrations, and then hands on again. As soon as they did their steps on the computer, everyone else would started talking. I sat there struggling to work, frustrated with the noise level in the room. When I called my trainer over and complained and the co-workers talking, this is what happened.

    My trainer, clicked away without looking at me, and said..

    I seriously doubt that you are cut out for this job. :crosseyed

    sure enough, when I finished the training session, and got on the floor, I could not believe the constant level of talking going on between workers while waiting for calls. they even put callers on hold to stand up, look over the cubicles to their neighbors!

    It is very similiar to being in a hospital or or facility, with constant beeping, alarms, and cries and screams of other people. It is nerve wracking! When you are sick, you can sleep thru almost anything... once you are better, you know it, because you can't stand the constant noise around you.

    People say folks who live near trains, expressways, and other noisy places get accustomed to the sounds, and barely notice them. I am not one of them! I find it hard to sleep thru rainstorms, and I struggle to ignore the busses that zoom by my house every day, and never got over the freeway traffic noise when I lived in L.A.

    maybe we are on the verge of retirement...:unsure:
     
  18. mmswm

    mmswm Moderator

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    There is a huge difference between chatter about the lesson and unrelated chit chat. I don't mind if two students are talking about something we're doing in class, but when the conversation switched to which boy is cuter and what girl are you going to ask to the dance, then I put a stop to it.

    Actually, my students impressed me to the point where I let the side chatter go one day. We were studying formal logic, specifically implication statements, and I made the comment that the conversation didn't sound much like logic, so they immediately switched the FORM of their conversation to be entirely logic based. They listed arguments in various forms and developed conclusions based on their arguments, then would try to poke holes in each other's logic. The converstaion was about boys, but they were learning FAR more logic than I could ever have taught them on my own.
     
  19. Master Pre-K

    Master Pre-K Virtuoso

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    I find which-boy-is-cuter talk in college highly annoying...

    I hope to never enroll in another undergrad/grad class...I have been blindsided by the 400 class which is actually a 300 class, and two grad students. :( I know I will be safe if it is 500/600 level course only.
     
  20. Doug_HSTeach_07

    Doug_HSTeach_07 Comrade

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    Apr 19, 2008

    Any talking during a lesson is too much talking. I expect it quiet while I deliver the lesson until I ask the class a question for discussion. It just makes for good classroom order!
     
  21. Tasha

    Tasha Phenom

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    I only stop them from talking if I am giving a lesson, I am reading, and during their writing workshop time. Also, absolutely no talking in the hall. They have to whisper during center time so that I can meet with a guided reading group. Otherwise, they can pretty much talk as long as it isn't too loud or they are asking each other for specific answers. I think kids need a good foundation of oral language before they can read and write, it is also important to all other learning that they be able to discuss ideas and synthesize them through peer discussion.
     
  22. Tasha

    Tasha Phenom

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    This is much more appropriate with middle school students than first grade students. First grade students are much more able to talk about what they have learned than write about it. Middle school students need to concentrate more and are more likely to be taking notes than involved in a group learning activity where talking is necessary.
     

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