How many teachers quit mid-year?

Discussion in 'General Education' started by DrivingPigeon, Oct 16, 2014.

  1. DrivingPigeon

    DrivingPigeon Phenom

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    Oct 16, 2014

    Just out of curiosity, how many teachers typically quit mid-year at your school? What are their reasons usually?

    Last year we had 2 teachers quit mid-year, and the year before there was one. They all found other jobs in districts that weren't as competitive as mine. My district tends to be an "up-and-coming" district, and they throw a million things at us at once. People are so stressed out that I've heard of one other person who is thinking about quitting already. She worked 16 years in another district, switched to my district, and now wants to quit.

    Is this normal?
     
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  3. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Maven

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    I think it depends on your school. At my school right now, since I've been here, nobody has left mid-year.

    At the school I previous taught at, I was hired mid-year for a long-term sub position because the teacher quit to become a pharmacist.
     
  4. KinderCowgirl

    KinderCowgirl Phenom

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    I don't know that we've ever had one mid-year. We've had newbies quit after pre-service or the first week of school with the kids. Mostly it's because the job was harder than they had expected. Everyone is pretty stressed at my school right now with new mandates but no one is talking about quitting-mostly maybe before next school year I might retire. ;)
     
  5. YoungTeacherGuy

    YoungTeacherGuy Phenom

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    Never heard of a teacher quitting mid-year.

    The only time I've heard of a teacher leaving in the middle of the year is when they become very ill and take an extended leave of absence.
     
  6. giraffe326

    giraffe326 Virtuoso

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    I've only worked with one who left because her husband got a ew job in another state.

    Of course I quit the charter school I worked at after 5-6 weeks. That was special though. I checked their website- they only have three returning teachers. Out of 11. And at least 2-3 quit midyear after I left. So that says a lot!
     
  7. bella84

    bella84 Aficionado

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    I quit mid-year a few years ago. I left an awful charter, where approximately half of the staff had either left voluntarily or been fired by the end of the first year. I was considered an at-will employee and found a MUCH better opportunity teaching in a local public school, so I did what was best for me and got out of there.

    I don't see as many people leave mid-year in my current district. I think this is mostly because it's a decent district. Despite all of the problems we have, it's considered one of the best in the area. With that said, it could also be because the district can blacklist you (meaning you lose your state certification) if you don't honor your full contract. I know a couple teachers left mid-year when I started - one had health issues and the other took a job in another state (although she told the district it was her husband who took a new job in another state).

    In order for me to leave my current job mid-year now, I'd have to be very sure that I don't want to teach in this state ever again. It's not guaranteed that you get blacklisted, but it's not a chance I'm willing to take right now.
     
  8. Pashtun

    Pashtun Fanatic

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    Never heard of a teacher quitting midyear at the school I work at.

    Kind of on topic, every middle and high school teacher that has come down to teach elementary at our school, has returned to their old position after one year.
     
  9. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    My first long-term sub assignment (16 years ago) was to replace a teacher who left in April to take a job in another school board. Since then, I've known 2 teachers who left mid-year. One, was "helped" out the door by several negative evaluations, the other initially went out on a "stress" leave, and then decided to leave teaching completely.
     
  10. Go Blue!

    Go Blue! Connoisseur

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    I have taught at 3 different schools in my 7 years in BCPS and every single year, at least 2 teachers leave before Christmas.

    This year we have had 2 teachers quit so far outside of the 4 teaching positions that have been taught by long-term subs since day one. My Admin claims they can't find certified teachers for these positions, but I don't buy that.

    At our last staff meeting, Admin said that they are looking on Craigslist for certified teachers ... Apparently, that is where they found two of my current co-workers.
     
  11. DrivingPigeon

    DrivingPigeon Phenom

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    That's how my district is, too, but they have such ridiculously high expectations that so many people are stressed and quitting. We're a fairly small district (only 5 elementary schools), and one of the highest-performing districts in the state.

    I don't think that any of the other elementary schools have had teachers quit mid-year since I've been in the district. I think part of the reason for that, though, is because we have a very young staff. The other schools are going through the same things, but the staff is more "established" and afraid to leave.
     
  12. swansong1

    swansong1 Virtuoso

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    I guess I have worked at the wrong schools! Every school I have ever worked at has had teachers leave mid year. Some left to take a better job, some had spousal transfers, some were fired, some just couldn't take it.
     
  13. Flanny108

    Flanny108 Rookie

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    There have been a few that have quit midyear in the schools where I have worked. The most memorable one was when a teacher walked out of her classroom in the middle of the day, hopped in her car and never came back.
     
  14. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    We always have at least a few teachers quit mid-year. We have lost a few already this year and I expect that we will lose at least a few more by the holidays. They usually quit because they are fed up with a lack of support from admin. Sometimes they quit because they can get a better paying job parking cars or working construction. Sometimes they "quit" indirectly by simply choosing not to take/pass their professional tests (Praxis, etc.) in time and are removed from the classroom.

    We also always have unfilled positions staffed by long-term subs. I'm sure we have at least a dozen of these such positions right now.
     
  15. Ima Teacher

    Ima Teacher Virtuoso

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    Typically, none.

    One year we had a teacher leave to take a job at a job in another county. (Higher paying position, too.)

    This year we had a teacher leave to go back to school, and another had to leave for letting her certification expire.

    As far as just leaving because they didn't like it, none.
     
  16. MissScrimmage

    MissScrimmage Aficionado

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    Nope, never.
     
  17. readingrules12

    readingrules12 Aficionado

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    In over 20 years, I have only seen it twice. One couldn't take it any more and got out of teaching. The other her husband got a job out of state. Both instances were many, many years ago.
     
  18. teacherintexas

    teacherintexas Maven

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    Lots of people at my campus are contemplating it this year.
     
  19. catnfiddle

    catnfiddle Moderator

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    It's happened twice in my department. One thought that online teaching would be easy and turn into part time work (HAH). Another decided he didn't want to teach high school and quit to be a full-time adjunct professor. Will never understand either mindset.
     
  20. waterfall

    waterfall Virtuoso

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    I've never heard that this has happened at my school. In fact, people don't generally quit at all, even at the end of the year. Most people have been there 15+ years. I got my position from a retirement.

    At my last school, we had two quit mid-year, because our admin was so horrible. They both left teaching all together. I strongly considered leaving mid-year, but didn't because I was afraid another district would never understand and I'd never get another teaching job. I know a lot of other teachers at that school felt the same way. 70% of the staff left at the end of the year or during the summer.
     
  21. smalltowngal

    smalltowngal Multitudinous

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    I quit mid-year due to medical issues. In the three districts that I've worked in, I've only known 2 that quit midyear. One quit to work the railroad so he had more time with his kids and more money, and the didn't pass the certification test in the allotted time.
     
  22. teacherguy111

    teacherguy111 Cohort

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    I haven't really heard of a teacher leaving mid school year. One teacher at my current school left a charter school to come and work at our school.
     
  23. a2z

    a2z Virtuoso

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    The only teachers I know who left mid-year did so for medical reasons for self or family. All, except for one who was in another school, went on medical leave.

    I've yet to know a teacher who just quit mid-year. That is not to say that it doesn't happen in schools I do not know about or in other districts.
     
  24. Ms.Blank

    Ms.Blank Companion

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    If someone quits mid-year, do they generally get a long term sub to complete the year, or will they hire a full-time teacher? Does it make a difference, since from what I've seen, most teachers (when they start out) are on year-to-year contracts? (edit...just realized the pay would be TOTALLY different...so I'd be likely to believe they'd rather give it to a long term sub, am I right?)

    Just trying to plan for when I'm teaching, as I'm going to be finishing my credential right smack dab in the middle of the school year :) From what you guys have posted, I think I might be weary of middle of the year jobs...seems like majority of the time, it's due to the district/administration/ being undesirable :/
     
  25. otterpop

    otterpop Phenom

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    This is a total guess, but it seems to me they would have to hire a teacher, or at least attempt to.

    A sub is only someone who is in a classroom because the assigned teacher can't be there (or a teacher cannot be found to be hired). I don't think you could have a sub in a classroom with no assigned teacher. I have seen positions posted as being "for the remainder of the school year".
     
  26. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    This might depend on district policies. In my district it is very common to have a long-term sub as the only teacher in the classroom all year. We have at least a dozen such teachers on my campus right now. They aren't filling in for anyone specific. They are there because the school couldn't fill those positions with licensed teachers.
     
  27. Go Blue!

    Go Blue! Connoisseur

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    Here, if the person quits before October, we might get a certified teacher as a replacement but this is rare. Most of the time, we just get a long-term sub for the rest of the year.

    I found out today that our 8th grade English teacher quit last Friday and Admin has already got a sub who is expected to be their teacher for the rest of the year. This is the same thing when our only Spanish teacher quit; now her classes are being taught by a sub who appears to be learning Spanish alongside the kids ...
     
  28. OhThePlaces

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    I was hired mid-year (the end of February) two years ago to fill an open position, so it definitely happens in some districts! The teacher I took over for had a major attendance issue, and they moved her into a different position that wouldn't hurt the kids so much if she wasn't there.
     
  29. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    In my experience here, it is generally a long-term sub who is hired to finish out the year.
     
  30. Pi-R-Squared

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    It just happened today in my school. The teacher found a position that opened up in her hometown. That hometown position opened up when someone left for a position on a college staff. I didn't realize that teachers could do this. I thought contracts are to be enforced by both sides. Never knew teachers could just give notice and be gone.
     
  31. waterfall

    waterfall Virtuoso

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    I got a call for an interview mid-year because someone had quit, the same year that I was seriously thinking of quitting my position mid-year. However, I figured if that person had quit mid-year, it had to be just as bad as the school I was at, and at least I liked my teammates that I was with at the time. I decided not to take the interview.
     
  32. DrivingPigeon

    DrivingPigeon Phenom

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    In my district, they hire a long-term sub for 2 main reasons:
    1) They don't have to pay benefits.
    2) The candidate pool isn't as large mid-year. They would rather wait until summer and have more choices for a permanent hire.
     
  33. pinkrobots27

    pinkrobots27 Rookie

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    I'm at a bilingual private school but we have had six people leave this year! That's a lot when consider the small size of our staff. Of those 6
    -5 were teachers/assistant teachers
    -1 was administration
    -2 were fired
    -1 left cursing and screaming, escorted by security

    Our administration says one thing and does another. Our pay is awful especially when you consider all the demands and random hours we are asked to stay late. The powers that be only look for a warm body to put in each classroom. They don't think long-term. I do and that's why I'm looking for a new school for next year (we run on a January to December calendar).
     
  34. FarFromHome

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    I've quit twice mid-year. Once was at the end of December and once in mid-March. Both were for military reasons, so I didn't have any problems.
     
  35. otterpop

    otterpop Phenom

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    I guess it's more of a regional thing than I thought, then. In my homestate, I think most schools would hire midyear. My new state has problems finding teachers, so having a sub in the classroom is common, since they are unable to fill the positions.
     
  36. mrachelle87

    mrachelle87 Fanatic

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    I was hired at my first two jobs after school started. The first in October and the second in late September...both schools started second week in August.
     
  37. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    I was initially hired after the school year started, and I've seen teachers hired mid-year several times. In all cases, though, these were not a result of teachers leaving, but because of adding a new teacher because of increased enrollment.
     

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