How Long Has Your Sub Pay Been What it Is?

Discussion in 'Substitute Teachers' started by Ms. I, Nov 3, 2010.

  1. glitzeyes

    glitzeyes Rookie

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    Dec 23, 2010

    Aliceacc, I wish this were the case but the principal was there when the teacher said that she was NOT writing any lesson plans. In addition, this is for the entire 2nd semester, not just six weeks....They had to have a teacher who has my degree in order to fill this leave since it is so long. I am honored to be chosen but now I sorta feel like if they wanted me to have all these teacher responsibilities then shouldn't I be properly compensated? I don't want to turn down the job now after I already accepted..I should of found out the exact compensation before accepting. However, it would probably be foolish to turn this down since this is going to be a great experience and possible could lead to a contract positon for next year( which I so desperately want) but I can't help but feel a pit in my stomach when I think of all the work ahead of me for the same pay as someone who is teacher certified but has the plans all prepared...
     
  2. TeacherApr

    TeacherApr Groupie

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    Dec 25, 2010

    Yep, and I deal with that EVERY paycheck. I am at poverty level but not so bad that I can get any help. My daughter and I struggle every day.

    Right. And the topic wasn't LTS exclusively. In fact it was the general "sub" word. OF COURSE if you are a LTS you should get paid more BECAUSE you are fulfilling all teacher responsibilities which include lesson plans. Back home and where I am at now, LTS get paid more. I have also left lesson plans my ENTIRE maternity leave. They weren't followed. (I wasn't required to do this) What a waste of my time.

    I HAVE been a sub and I get the system. I get the teachers who left everything WONDERFULLY for me and I also get those that do a crappy job getting ready for a sub. My expectations are high with subs but not so high that no one can reach them. Unfortunately, I have been exposed to a lot of crappy subs that cannot deal with a classroom BUT I do remember fondly, those that did a fantastic job in my classroom. I :love:them heh. And those are the ones I ask back if they are available.

    I resent getting chewed out via a PM because I am "against" subs. Why would I be against subs and think they are "crap" if I have been one before for 5 YEARS+ before I got my job? Doesn't make sense. Save that kind of stuff for someone else that is TRULY against subs and think they are idiots because I sure don't!
     
  3. Cerek

    Cerek Aficionado

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    Dec 26, 2010

    To have a full credential and earn poverty wages with absolutely no benefits is not absurd....it is life.....and sometimes life is tough.

    A college degree does NOT guarantee success in life or even a well-paying job. Two of my best friends in college were computer programmers. They eventually earned over $100k/yr (one of them while working from home), but they both also eventually LOST their well paying jobs and had to go BACK to school to find a new career in their mid-30s. Sometimes life doesn't go the way you want.

    I have a chronic illness, so individual health care is unaffordable. I currently pay $300/month for a catastrophic plan that doesn't cover a single item until AFTER I pay $5k out of pocket.

    In 2007, I was hired to work in our local Social Services offices making decent pay. However, my manager gave me absolutely ZERO training, then fired me 4 months later because my work wasn't up to standards (Nah? Really?) Anytime I DID ask a question about procedure, I was told "It's in the manual" (which was online). I wasn't told WHERE to look in the manual, just that it was "in the manual". That's like sending someone into a SAM'S Warehouse to find a fishing pole (with no employee's inside to help).

    After being fired from that job, I went into the hospital for problems connected to my chronic conditions. That led to two surgeries (due to complications from the first one), near death, receiving of Last Rites, 3 days in a coma and a total of 6 weeks in the hospital (4 of them in ICU).

    After finally getting home, it was 3 months before I could even get out of the house without collapsing from exhaustion. It was during this time that I finally decided to pursue my desire to be a teacher.

    During the summer, I became certified as a substitute teacher. I then applied to my alma-mater to seek alternative licensure as a credentialed teacher. I subbed for 1 year while taking online courses, then managed to get my student teaching done last year (and began subbing again after Christmas Break). I also began working in the 21st Century After school, took a job as a desk clerk at a local hotel and worked TWO Summer Camps in the local district.

    This year, I was VERY lucky to receive an offer to teach - but it is only part time. So I am STILL working after school - usually until 5:30pm every day. I also still work as a desk clerk at the hotel, often working BOTH weekend days in addition to teaching and working after school all week. Oh Yeah, I also sub as a certified bus driver too. And I do not get any benefits or healthcare from ANY of these jobs.

    I had to work yesterday AND today at the hotel, since I'm still low man on the totem pole. I also had to work OVER for an hour because my manager decided the 2nd shift person could clean the rooms instead of bringing in housekeepers today. I am a single father and was supposed to have Christmas with my boys as soon as my shift ended. Last night, I had to tell them they would have to wait a little longer to open their gifts because of the different work schedule.

    So, I hope you'll understand why I have a difficult time feeling sympathy for someone making less than maximum wage and getting no benefits even though they are fully credentialed. All I can say is "Welcome to my world". Oh...did I mention I ALSO have a BSBA in Finance AND Marketing both? And yet, I still have to work 3 (and sometimes 4) part-time jobs to make ends meet. I DO understand your frustration (trust me, I know how it feels), but I also understand that ANY pay is better than NO pay.

    Like I said, Life is tough sometimes. But the strongest steel is forged in the hottest fire.

    BTW, the pay for subs in our district is around $63/day for non-credential and $91/day for credentialed subs. I've not had an LTS assignment, so I don't know if the district pays extra for that.
     
  4. Cerek

    Cerek Aficionado

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    Dec 26, 2010

    I agree with others that an LTS assignment should include a pay differential since you are taking on more of the regular teacher's daily responsibilities. It doesn't make any sense to me that sick leave WOULD offer higher pay for the LTS, but maternity leave does not. I don't know if admin deliberately took advantage of you personally, but they certainly took advantage of the loophole offered by maternity leave.

    The best thing you can do is use this as a learning experience. In your next interview, you will know to ask more specific questions about the pay or compensation for the job. Interviewees are supposed to have questions for the committee or person(s) conducting the interview. That shows they really have an interest in the position being offered and asking about the pay is a very legitimate question to ask. Sometimes, there might even be some negotiation room (but not always).

    You can also use the LTS assignment as solid experience in your area of expertise on your resume'. Classroom management techniques, lesson plans, daily routines, parent calls and conferences, staff meetings (possibly) and building a rapport with the students are just some of the skills and duties you will be able to improve and refine during this assignment. While it WOULD be nice to also get the extra pay you deserve, the best approach is to look at all the other rewards the assignment can offer, not to mention possibly getting your foot in the door for future openings. ;)
     
  5. oldstudent

    oldstudent Comrade

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    Dec 26, 2010

    What you went through was tough, but ALSO absurd. It is the unfairness of life taken to extremes, and you certainly have my symphathies.
    However, although the more tragically relative difficulties you have experienced when compared with subbing are certainly clear, it does not make the general treatments of subs OK. We should not be thankful for what districts provide us just because there are more tragic alternatives.

    Any time a group of employees has no representation(unions), and supply far outweighs demand, those employees will be walked over unfairly. This is what subs face, and will continue to face, as long as subs tolerate the way things are.

    My monthly expenses for health insurance is $415/mo. I have diabetes and high cholesterol as well.
     
  6. Cerek

    Cerek Aficionado

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    Dec 26, 2010

    OK....I see what you are saying and I agree those are fair points.

    It would be nice if subs were paid more money and, ideally, I think a good argument could be made for a credentialed sub earning up to 50% of regular teacher pay, since benefits still would not be involved. However, I am indeed, thankful that can earn at least some money as a substitute teacher. The pay is low, especially for non-credentialed subs, but I prefer working in the school system rather than Wal-Mart or McDonalds (where I did work for 6 years during HS and college).

    I knew substitute teacher wouldn't pay all of my bills, so I took measures to (a) make myself more marketable and (b) find other work to supplement my income. I became a fully licensed bus driver, which is always a "plus" for the schools I work for and I applied for the job as desk clerk because it seemed like a much less hectic work environment than Wal-Mart or some other retail chain.

    School districts across the country face severe budget cuts and it is only natural that substitute teachers will bear a large burden of the decreased budget. Districts can afford to offer lower pay because there is a plentiful supply of subs and, quite honestly, I would prefer districts that support their regular teachers first because most of them are also seriously underpaid for the education they received and the daily responsibilities they bear.

    You're correct that subs could (and maybe should) lobby for better pay, but I accept the fact that it is what it is and just find other ways to supplement my income.
     
  7. Ms. I

    Ms. I Maven

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    Dec 26, 2010

    I completely agree w/ ALL of the above. Us subs are human too who get ill, sometimes develop serious medical issues that may be chronic, etc., so for us not to have that security of any kind of benefits is a real shame!

    That's a shame! I'm glad my district isn't that picky as to give LT pay or not depending on the REASON the regular teacher's out. For me, as long as I'm in the same classroom starting that 26th day, I get more pay. I get $125/day for day-to-day subbing & $150/day for LTS.

    But, what I'm kind of upset about is that I'm a speech who subs for schools that don't even have a Speech-Language Pathologist because they've been short on them for the last decade & longer, but SLPs aren't at the same school consecutively at my district. For ex, it's something like MW at school A & THF at school B. So I'm still subbing daily, but since I'm not at the same school for DAYS IN A ROW, I still don't get that long-term pay even though I'm subbing for months & months, so that's unfair in a way too! :mad: Now some of you may think I'm being unreasonably picky, but I'm just venting like you guys about how you're paid.
     
  8. oldstudent

    oldstudent Comrade

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    Dec 27, 2010

    Some fair points are made here.

    I believe, however, that subbing, or any job that requires five years of college, should pay enough so that supplemental income is an option and not a necessity.
    Even in booming economic times, subs would still need to supplement their incomes.
    My main district lowered our wages by $10 per day due to budget restrictions while regular teachers had to lose wages in the form of furlough days.
    When the district recieved the expected funds, teachers got their furlough days back. But of course, we did not get our $10/day back.

    Any sub who attempts to lobby for better pay or benefits will not be called to work, and they will have no recourse because, ironically, they do not have any representation, which is one reason for lobbying in the first place.
    Of course, even though they will not be called, they will still be "employed', and hence disallowed from unemployment benefits while looking for another job.

    Here in CA, the average teacher earns between 60-70K, with benefits bringing it close to 80K. I average near 20K with no benefits. I am fully credentialed with 13+ years experience.
     
  9. glitzeyes

    glitzeyes Rookie

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    Dec 28, 2010

    Thank you Cerek. I appreciate your helpful suggestions in regards to using this as a learning experience. I did ask many questions and it is true, they did appreciate the fact I thought out questions on a notecard and added those that arose during the interview but I just didn't press the money issue...will make sure to do this in my next interview.
     
  10. Cerek

    Cerek Aficionado

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    Dec 28, 2010

    In our area, Substitute Teachers only need to take one course at the local community college to become a Certified Sub. It does not require any further college experience and, in my school, some of our most dependable subs are moms of our students.

    I understand your disappointment about losing the $10/hour, but I agree with the district for restoring the furlough days for the regular teachers first, just as I would expect any corporation to take care of their full time employees first and part-time or contract employees next. Your pay is still one of the best I've seen for subs, but I don't know what the cost of living is in your area, so $125/day there may not be that much better than the $91/day our district pays.

    Ms. I - it would be nice if schools offered health insurance to subs, but most companies do not offer benefits to part-time employees. It's one way they keep overhead down. Some companies have begun changing this practice. Even fast food restaurants often offer some benefits to their employees.

    In my district, I can qualify for benefits if I work a certain number of hours every week. That's one of the incentives I have for working in the afterschool program. Those hours are added to my teaching hours and bring me closer to the total hours needed to qualify for benefits. Still, I do accept the fact that part-time work usually does NOT include benefits and I don't blame companies or districts for not offering them. That's just the way it is.
     
  11. oldstudent

    oldstudent Comrade

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    Dec 28, 2010

    As I discussed in detail in an older post, I feel there should be two classes of subs, with some credentialed subs being full time employees.
    The system as it is now does work well for some subs, so it should not be eliminated.

    One benefit that all subs should be entitled to is accumulated sick days.
    For every 25-30 days worked, subs should be allowed one day off with pay to allow for unexpected illnesses or necessities.
    Even part time employees accumulate sick days, only at a slower rate.
     
  12. teacherintexas

    teacherintexas Maven

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    Dec 31, 2010

    Subs in my area are not required to even have an associate's degree. I think it is only 30 hours of college credit with no requirements in what type of credits earned. Certified teachers do earn more and I fully support that, but there are very few who sub here. There are a few retired teachers who sub but they are hard to get since they're requested so far in advance.

    Here, finding subs who read well enough to follow detailed plans is difficult. I've had subs who do not do a single assignment left for the class. Then, when I show the principal my plans and what was done, those subs don't get called again.
     
  13. TeacherApr

    TeacherApr Groupie

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    Dec 31, 2010

    Same here
     
  14. Ms. I

    Ms. I Maven

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    Dec 31, 2010

    Woah, so if subs can't read the plans well enough to follow them, this should tell the districts something...that they should require past an AA or AS degree. But, I know, they don't want to have to pay the higher pay that will then be fair to pay them!
     
  15. Vince

    Vince Rookie

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    Jan 14, 2011

    To the OP: how long have I been paid the same? Well last year in my district the rate DROPPED by $10 a day. That's $180-200 a month for an average of 18-20 days a month I typically get.

    We now make $100 a day and we don't have to be certified, but we do have to have a BA and pass the CBEST which is a three part basic skills test.

    After seeing what some of you make, I'm not complaining, but the cost of living here in So Cal is pretty high.

    Of course we have no benefits whatsoever.
     

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