How Long Has Your Sub Pay Been What it Is?

Discussion in 'Substitute Teachers' started by Ms. I, Nov 3, 2010.

  1. Ms. I

    Ms. I Maven

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    I know we subs all deserve raises! I've been getting paid the same daily pay for the last 6 yrs at least ($125/day)! :mad:
     
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  3. TeacherApr

    TeacherApr Groupie

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    ONLY $125/day????

    Be thankful! When I was subbing 4 yrs ago, one district was $80/day and another was $116/day. With my calculations, as a full time teacher, I am only getting $165/day. Pretty pitiful. Subs should not be getting more than classroom teachers in my opinion.
     
  4. Ms. I

    Ms. I Maven

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    Oh I'm grateful! :) Isn't that something that it's only a $40 difference between a sub & actual teacher who has a whole boatload more responsibilities?! When I was a resource specialist, I calculated my salary by the hour & I agree that it isn't a lot.
     
  5. TeacherApr

    TeacherApr Groupie

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    It should be going up though based on cost of living! = )

    Are you guys required to be certified? If so, then I think you should be getting pay raises...
     
  6. sunshine*inc

    sunshine*inc Cohort

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    The pay is actually lower in my main district now than it was 10 years ago. It went down last year. My second district pays $20 per day higher.
     
  7. Ms. I

    Ms. I Maven

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    TeacherApr, I honestly don't know. I've been a sub w/ them since way before I got my 2 credentials, so I have no idea if there's new requirements regarding that. I'm thinking no & that an emergency sub permit is all that's still required (in which one needs an undergrad degree in any subject, passing of CBEST, TB test, & fingerprinting). But, I have had 2 credentials since 2006, so I should be getting paid more than the subs w/ the minimum requirements!
     
  8. webmistress

    webmistress Devotee

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    When I started subbing in 2005 it was $46 per day if not certified, which I wasn't at the time. It's now $65 per day if not certified.

    Certified is now $90 a day, you get paid once a month and also, your check will be 2 months after the day you worked. For example if you sub in March, you get that payment in May.
     
  9. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    In this economy, pretty much no one is getting raises.

    It's not a of "deserving" or not.

    It's a matter of not being able to get blood from a stone.
     
  10. ku_alum

    ku_alum Aficionado

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    What Alice said.
    Our sub pay is the same regardless of qualifications.
     
  11. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    That's the same here; only contracted teachers' salary is tied in any way to experience and qualifications.
     
  12. springmac

    springmac Companion

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    In my state, subs are required to be certified. The pay here has been the same forever! We start at $70/day. Then, the pay goes up based on number of sub days. The next step is $80, and the final is $90. I start a LTS in a few weeks, but thankfully I will be getting paid teacher salary from my start date until the end of the school year.
     
  13. gossamer

    gossamer Rookie

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    Here there is a difference between, degreed, certified and Long Term Subs. I am currently in a LTS position and I get 108 a day.
     
  14. John Lee

    John Lee Groupie

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    But this is NOT because of the current state of the economy, 2010.

    Our pay and the way it's structured (flat rate, no chance of raise, no benefit, etc.) has never been a consideration. They simply don't think it's an issue worth addressing. (e.g. Teachers clearly consider us a separate breed altogether.)

    I've not had a raise in... 8 years?
     
  15. kcjo13

    kcjo13 Phenom

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    Wait...teachers don't determine pay, administrators do. And school boards.
     
  16. PCdiva

    PCdiva Connoisseur

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    That is not true for every where though...In the district I worked in last before getting the job I have now, we paid union dues (which were only $2/per day worked) but that was definitely worth it...bc of that the union negotiated our pay and we recieved a $1 raise per year....it was also one of the highest paying districts for subs around.

    I would think other districts would have the same...but who knows.
     
  17. azure

    azure Companion

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    We do not have to be certified. I'm in a city of about 50,000 population. If you do not have a degree I think it's $65 or $70. With a Bachelors degree I get 80/day and if you have a masters it's $90. I think it's been at that rate for about 12 years.

    The county schools pay less-- in the $55-65 range.
     
  18. Kangaroo22

    Kangaroo22 Virtuoso

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    One of the districts I sub in has a sub union and the dues (which I think are about $70/year) are definitely worth it! Every year the pay has gone up $4/day for the last few years and there is a good increase once you sub 20 days in the district for the year.
     
  19. Tutor

    Tutor Comrade

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    I teach in a Catholic school and the sub pay is $55 a day. It's very hard to find people to work for that little money.
     
  20. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    I realize I'm getting older.

    But how does "never" equate to "8 years"??

    And what do teachers have to do with it? They're most certainly not the ones determining the budget.
     
  21. azure

    azure Companion

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    Did you ever consider that he meant that he's been subbing 8 years and hasn't had a raise?
     
  22. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Alice is a smart cookie- I'm absolutely certain that she understands that the sub in question hasn't had a raise in 8 years.

    The quote was "Our pay and the way it's structured (flat rate, no chance of raise, no benefit, etc.) has never been a consideration. They simply don't think it's an issue worth addressing. (e.g. Teachers clearly consider us a separate breed altogether.)"

    Never is an awful long time...districts are under budgetary constraints- even in better economic times. The cost of healthcare and benefits for contracted employees has been rising for far more than 8 years while school aid and budgets have been under pressure to do more with less. Teachers are not the ones who 'address the issue' of sub pay...and for the record, teachers do appreciate and respect good subs...but do know that these are times where EVERYONE'S job, pay and benefits are under attack- so when the tough budget decisions are made, district priorities will differ from the wants and needs of subs (and contracted staff as well.) :sorry:
     
  23. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Thank you czacza.

    Yes, I'm happy to report that I have no issues with reading comprehension.
     
  24. KateA

    KateA Rookie

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    Sigh...
     
  25. pjlmom

    pjlmom Rookie

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    no raise

    I make 63 dollars a day. I have a degree, but I am not certified to teach. Even long term assignments are payed the same. I have worked four years and have never gotten a raise.
     
  26. mom2ohc

    mom2ohc Habitué

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    our subs get 70, 80 or 90 dependign on how long they have been subbing and their certification.
     
  27. oldstudent

    oldstudent Comrade

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    But administrators listen to teachers.

    I recently had a union rep tell me that teachers always vote against increased representation for subs.

    My three districts pay $140, $125 and $115 per day.

    The district that pays $115 gave subs a raise about five years ago from $100, but also took away the extra period pay that brought the total at that to $116 and change.

    The district that pays $140 has had the same rate for the last five years.

    The district that gives me 90% of my work paid $135 last year, but reduced our wages to $125 due to budget cuts.

    This district recently received some budget money, so they they brought back five furlough days for the kids.

    Any chance subs will get our $10/ day back? Yeah right!

    In my districts , the average teacher makes about $60,000 per year plus benefits and sick days.

    As a fully credentialed sub, I average about $20,000 per year with no benefits or sick pay.
    Therefore, contracted teachers , I would estimate, earn about 25% of what contracted teachers make.

    I believe we should get about 50-60% of what contracted teachers make, with greater accountability.
     
  28. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    As a teacher, I have never had any say in salary or work conditions or contracts for subs--those contracts are between the sub union and the school board.
     
  29. INteacher

    INteacher Aficionado

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    Same here - our school board determines sub pay without ANY consideration from the union or the teaching staff.
     
  30. oldstudent

    oldstudent Comrade

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    Certainly teachers do not make decisions on our pay scale, but at least in some districts their input is considered.
    I doubt the union rep I spoke with is making this up.

    What sub union? I wish we had one.
     
  31. Muttling

    Muttling Devotee

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    Our school system hasn't changed it's pay scales for non-salaried (e.g. substitutes, cafeteria, etc.) in 6 years. 10 years for salaried.

    Now they say, "We can't do it now because we're in a budget crisis."



    Well, 2 points....

    1 - You didn't do it when we weren't in a budget crisis so what's the difference?????

    2 - You expect tremendous performance and GREAT changes while cutting the funding. You want to attract the best teachers, but expect them to show up for lower pay than other counties. Don't go onto a Mercedes lot with a check that belongs on the Buy Here Pay Here lot.
     
  32. Lindager

    Lindager Companion

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    We got a $5/day raise this year

    I live in one of the richest areas in the country. Many if not most of the districts in this area have raised teacher starting salaries to over $50K/year + benefits. In Sept. I was trying to decide what new districts to apply to. The lowest paying district was my local one where Sub. aides (same requirements as sub teachers) made $55 and sub teachers made $70/day. The highest paying district had a sliding scale based on days worked per year with $90/day after 20 days worked. These work out to $7.33 to ~$12.00/hr. This is in an area where Walmart starts at $9/hr. The requirements to sub are just 60 college credits, but there is no change in pay even if you have a Masters.

    When I was among several subs that said we would no longer come in to sub as an aide our sub coordinater went to the Superintendant and asked for a raise. they raised aides to $70/ day and teachers to $75. It does not make a big difference in my check, but I feel a little more appreciated.

    If you take the $50K a new teacher makes and divide it by 190 days(about the number of days a teacher reports to work/year and give them an extra 2 hrs/day for prep and assessment. That is still over $27/hr. + sick time, personnal time, health and retirement etc. etc.
    I just think a good substitute should be worth more then 1/3-1/4 of what a new teacher is.

    just my :2cents:
     
  33. oldstudent

    oldstudent Comrade

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    I am fully credentialed, but when lack of perks is taken into account, I earn about about 20-25% of what a contracted teacher earns.
    My main district dropped our wage from $135/day to $125/day this year.
    There was an announcement recently that due to additional funds recieved from the state, the contracted teachers get back their furlough days.
    Will subs get thier $10/day back? Yeah right!
     
  34. hac711

    hac711 Companion

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    I get $85 dollars a day..before taxes...I could make more being a nanny...
     
  35. TeacherApr

    TeacherApr Groupie

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    I'm not trying to start arguments or anything just giving a different perspective on subs.

    Subs are not required to make lesson plans. They are not required to plan the day out. You have the day laid out in front of you and you just follow it. IF it was required that one be fully certified then yes, sub pay should be about $100 a day depending on your location. Back home teachers start at $36K and subs make $105/day. If the requirement is some college credits then the pay shouldn't be as much as if you had to be certified.


    You can also quit at any time and refuse jobs at any time. Teachers can't just suddenly not come into work without having to do extra work to plan for the sub.

    From what I am seeing, I think sub pay is pretty fair across the board.
     
  36. oldstudent

    oldstudent Comrade

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    Subs do not work as hard as contracted teachers, so I would never argue we should make as much, although we do have our own special challenges.
    However the discrepency is far too great.
    Credentialed subs should be catagorized seperately.

    To have a full credential and earn poverty wages with absolutely no benefits is absurd.
    Credentialed subs should earn 50-60% of what contracted teachers earn. Only 20-25% is certainly not fair. Losing a day's pay because we have an emergency and cannot make it in for a day is also unfair.

    The disadvantages of "choosing not to work" far outweigh the advantages.
     
  37. midwestteacher

    midwestteacher Cohort

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    Our sub pay is $75 a day and our subs have to be certified before they can step foot inside the classroom.
     
  38. glitzeyes

    glitzeyes Rookie

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    I am really bummed as I got a LTS job for the rest of the year but am getting paid the same($75) a day because it is for a materity leave not a sick leave..I am excited about the experience but I am going to be doing so much work and not being paid for it by the slightest bit :( I would be so happy with even $100 a day. I am a certified teacher so I especially deserve higher pay considering my degree but hopefully this will lead to a teaching position and then it is all worth it! I know another city school system pays $120 if you sub for 3 weeks or more for the same teacher but mine only does if it is a sick leave..bummer for me I guess...
     
  39. glitzeyes

    glitzeyes Rookie

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    TeacherApr: I agree that subs usually just have to follow the lesson except that when it is a LONG TERM SUB JOB in my situation I am doing all the planning, grading and all the other teacher responsibilities but not getting paid anymore than a sub who walks in the door with a lesson to follow..that is not right, especially when I have studied in college to be a teacher and am fully certified and qualified for this position(hence, the reason they chose me). But the principal doesn't make the rules. The school system decided that sub pay isnt different unless the teacher is out for sick leave and since it is a materity leave I get takin advantage of. (I wasn't told this or the dollar amount and should of asked in the second interview but I was so happy to be offered the position I didn't want to ruin my chances) However, I hope this may lead to a contract position so in the long run it will be worth it! Also please remember that subs sometimes are teachers who really want jobs but aren't able to find them due to the harsh economy and subbing isn't easy...plus a true teacher who is a sub is going to go above and beyond and help the students in all the ways she can while the teacher is out and deserves to make a decent living....
     
  40. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Glitzeyes, is it possible that the assumption is that the maternity leave teachers will leave a full set of lesson plans? (WHile someone who suddenly finds that she's having surgery doesn't have time to do so?)

    The two times I went out on maternity leave I left a full 6 weeks of lesson plans. (And in our building, we sub internally. So I was leaving math lessons for math teachers. I was just concerned that someone who hadn't taught, say, precalculus might end up with the class, so my notes were pretty complete.)

    I agree with you, though: if you're in the room for 6 weeks, it's an entirely different matter than walking into a lesson someone else has all planned out.
     
  41. John Lee

    John Lee Groupie

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    :thumb:

    THANK YOU.

    You also made a good point. People think that, "oh you can take days off whenever you want." No you can't. Unless you want to make no money. Unless you want the sub coordinator to think you are flaky and potentially not call you as much. It's a myth. We're not all retired teachers earning our pension, doing this as a diversion.
     

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