How long does it typically take you to lesson plan?

Discussion in 'Secondary Education' started by onestepcloser, Sep 6, 2010.

  1. onestepcloser

    onestepcloser Companion

    Joined:
    Jan 25, 2010
    Messages:
    119
    Likes Received:
    0

    Sep 6, 2010

    How long does it typically take you to lesson plan from scratch? Say for a day or week's worth of lessons. I'm a brand new teacher, so I'm starting from scratch mostly and am just curious as to how long you guys found it took you to plan when you were new teachers too. :)
     
  2.  
  3. WindyCityGal606

    WindyCityGal606 Enthusiast

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2006
    Messages:
    2,468
    Likes Received:
    12

    Sep 6, 2010

    I used to take forever then I got the hang of it after a while. Now, it takes forever again because we have to show differentiation for all subjects, every day! UGH! Below, At, and Above Levels. I have 4 preps so it takes about two hours per lesson plan for each prep. Not fun....I try to spread it out over the week.
     
  4. specialeduc8tor

    specialeduc8tor Rookie

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2010
    Messages:
    37
    Likes Received:
    0

    Sep 6, 2010

    I've been a "new teacher" for 4 years now...finally found a contract and know I"ll be teaching the same content for more than a year! It did take me a long time to lesson plan. Usually about 5-7 hours for each lesson (especially since I didn't know the content). Other teachers are your best resource. They helped me out a lot - beg, borrow, and steal (teacher's motto).

    Now that I'm teaching the same content for the second year in a row, it's much easier.

    It's tough the first year, but it does get better.
     
  5. apple25

    apple25 Comrade

    Joined:
    May 11, 2007
    Messages:
    275
    Likes Received:
    0

    Sep 6, 2010

    Whew -- well, a long time! I found planning on Saturdays and holidays the easiest, but my 1st year I was planning long into the night. I agree with the previous poster - on average it would be about 1 1/2 to 2 hours per lesson (though sometimes this would span a few days).
     
  6. onestepcloser

    onestepcloser Companion

    Joined:
    Jan 25, 2010
    Messages:
    119
    Likes Received:
    0

    Sep 6, 2010

    Thanks guys. I wasn't sure if I was just really slow, lol. So if I have 3 separate preps/classes, should I be allotting/expecting 4.5 to 6 hours of lesson planning for each day? Maybe not every day once I use some weekends to get ahead, but for now?
     
  7. chebrutta

    chebrutta Enthusiast

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2008
    Messages:
    2,489
    Likes Received:
    1

    Sep 6, 2010

    It takes me 2-3 hours per week to plan one week for two preps. I'm in my 5th year... and it's the first time I've had the same (main) prep two years in a row. Before this year... oh, HOURS. Lots of them. Late nights. Early mornings. Weekends.

    There's a lot of trial-and-error your first year - not only with lessons but with time management. Make sure you're carving out some "me" time for yourself :)
     
  8. 2ndTimeAround

    2ndTimeAround Phenom

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2010
    Messages:
    4,330
    Likes Received:
    572

    Sep 6, 2010

    YOu will find a rhythm. Last year I had to develop everything for myself. This year I"m at a different school and we do pretty much the same things as a cluster.

    I started out using powerpoints from other teachers at a different school. Then I found some online that worked well with my schedule. So I didn't have to build any of those (our school was big on using PPT if we were lecturing). I just modified.

    Then I found activities here and there to use. The key for me was to modify those activities as often as I could so I could just change small things and the kids would know the process even if it was new content.

    At the start of the year I went through my state's standards and figured out what chapters of the text covered that material. Then I decided in what order I wanted to teach the material.

    We would test every week and typically I would plan out the next week's lesson while they were testing. It would go something like this: read through the chapter. Build the test with a test editor. Modify any existing powerpoints. If the material was math-heavy, find worksheets for reinforcement. Look for a lab or demo I could do. Find or develop a project to match the material (usually took the longest time). Make sure there was something for the kinesthetic learner, auditory learner, etc. Then I would write out very simple lesson plans which looked more like daily itineraries for the week.

    Except for a brief question/answer session before each class, I had the whole day for planning each week. About six-seven hours worth of work.
     
    Last edited: Sep 6, 2010
  9. DallasLady

    DallasLady Rookie

    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2010
    Messages:
    66
    Likes Received:
    0

    Sep 17, 2010

    I guess it depends on what you mean by "lesson plan." Do you mean actually typing or writing out a calendar of lessons you plan to teach for the week? Or do you mean actually creating and prepping the lessons?

    The school that I'm currently at uses a standardized curriculum, so we don't have to write lesson plans. There are set lessons that we are supposed to teach with each unit, along with standardized unit tests. At first I thought I would hate it, but the lessons are very well thought out and it's so nice to not have to write up lesson plans.

    But that said, there is still time that I spend prepping my lessons, especially so because I teach science. I have to make copies, come up with demos and examples, set up labs, etc. Since I am teaching a new subject, it takes me a little longer to prepare myself, so about 45-60 minutes a day for me. That will get faster once I am more used to the subject.
     
  10. Muttling

    Muttling Devotee

    Joined:
    Sep 19, 2007
    Messages:
    1,095
    Likes Received:
    2

    Sep 17, 2010

    I come in early and do my daily lesson plan that day. If I don't it doesn't work as my plan for the week is usually out the door by Tuesday or Wednesday. (Sometimes they get it quick and sometimes they don't. What's more, it varies from one class to another so I sometimes have to do 3 different preps for 3 Algebra I classes.)

    I like doing it daily as it's fresh in my mind how I want it to go. The length of time varies greatly.

    Some topics, I can plan a 90 minute class in 15 minutes flat. Other topics can take as much as 2 hours to plan a 90 minute class. Average is 30 to 45 minutes for me. In my first year of teaching, it was over an hour per class.
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

Total: 244 (members: 1, guests: 218, robots: 25)
test