How long does it take in your state?

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by Alyssa20, Dec 16, 2017.

  1. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Maven

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    Dec 17, 2017

    After you get a credential and your first job with the preliminary credential, you're still regarded as a full teacher and have the teacher salary etc. The clear credential doesn't change anything except to say that you're done with BTSA and they may not be breathing down your neck as much.

    Same pay and stuff.

    Though you did forget to mention that you need 45-60 hours of k12 classroom experience and have passed the csets before even being accepted to the teacher credentialing program. These are usually volunteer hours where you're working for free. (I did these at a time in my life where working for free seemed like crazy because I was just trying to scrape up enough to live on and get places witgout a car.)
     
  2. Alyssa20

    Alyssa20 Rookie

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    Do Oregon teachers have to take exams similar to the CSETS? If I could be a teacher while getting my masters... then I much rather move to Oregon. It's the exams that worry me though.
     
  3. vickilyn

    vickilyn Magnifico

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    I'm confused. When my son became a teacher, the student teaching was part of the university program leading up to graduation. Fail student teaching, and you most likely won't be a teacher. However, you still have to pass all of the exams before you can be hired.
     
  4. vickilyn

    vickilyn Magnifico

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    I know that there are programs where one learns to teach after the undergrad degree, some with student teaching, some without. I worked with a teacher who went a fifth year. It can be considered undergrad in some schools, or grad school in others. I, on the other hand, came to teaching through the AR program, and there is no "student teaching", but there are over 200 hours of instruction taken while teaching, in addition to any mandated new teacher programs required and prepared by the district. NJ has upped the amount of preclassroom hours/service for AR teachers just beginning their trek through the system since when I went through the system.
     
    Last edited: Dec 17, 2017
  5. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Maven

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    Yes. They're called ORELAs. Honestly these tests like CSETs and ORELAs really aren't that bad. In my opinion, a person could totally pass them without having any prior education in the subject if they just studied using the test performance standards and some books from the library. This may be less true for the more specialized subjects but they were plenty doable.
     
  6. AlwaysAttend

    AlwaysAttend Fanatic

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    Agreed, student teaching is before graduation. You can’t count it twice. If it is after and separated, that seems to be a school decision, not a state one.
     
  7. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Maven

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    No. Our program was 1 year. You did the student teaching at the same time that you would take courses (you would take the courses in the evening), so it all happened in a single year. During this year you also took the TPAs (which were the most painful part of getting my clear credential).
     
  8. MissyB

    MissyB Rookie

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    This was the same way my program was set up. They were considered graduate classes and I worked as a student teacher the entire year. First semester I was in the classroom working Mon.-Wed. and then taking classes Thursday and Friday. Then second semester I worked as a student teacher all week and took classes in the evening and on Saturday. To get into the program I had to already have at least 45hrs in the classroom and passed everything except the RICA (that had to be completed before the end of the credential program).

    By the time I had finished everything I had 4 years for my B.A., 1 year to get my credential, then another 2 years completing BTSA while working as a full-time teacher. Other than people who go through Teach America I haven't encountered anyone completing it all any other way.
     
  9. Alyssa20

    Alyssa20 Rookie

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    I'm attending a CSU and they let me in despite not passing all my CSETS...I wish they didn't. Because if I can't pass my SubtestII then it was a huge waste of my time....I just wanted to hurry up and become a teacher. I never realized how demanding the program would be, and how difficult the SubtestII would be. I thought I could wing the Subtest II like the CBEST Math...not the case...especially with those written response questions...

    If your program allows you in despite not passing all CSETS....please never do it. It'll be so incredibly stressful.
     
  10. Alyssa20

    Alyssa20 Rookie

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    Yes. I'm afraid the Subtest II will be the only thing preventing from my dream of being a kindergarten teacher.
     
  11. Alyssa20

    Alyssa20 Rookie

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    None yet; I'm scheduled for January 22nd. But I've taken workshops and been using the cliff notes. I don't feel so confident with it though from my studying :( going to try my best nonetheless.
     
  12. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Aficionado

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    You may just be psyching yourself out. This happens sometimes to the best of us, meaning the trepidation leading up to the test might be worse than the actual test. I would buy a test prep book and do problems from there until you gain mastery.

    I wish you the best of luck! :)
     
    Alyssa20 and Peregrin5 like this.
  13. Alyssa20

    Alyssa20 Rookie

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    You're right. It's so tough, because I feel like I can't relax until I take it @_@ I just have so much anxiety over this. It's constantly in the back of my mind. But I am going to keep trying and trying. I mean...it took me 5 times to get my drivers licenses...if that explains my test anxiety x_x. Only with that, it didn't cost $100 each time ^^;
     
  14. AlwaysAttend

    AlwaysAttend Fanatic

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    And likely damaging society, one poorly educated kid at a time.
     
  15. Alyssa20

    Alyssa20 Rookie

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    That is very rude. I specifically want to teach Prek-1st Grade. The CSET SubtestII is at least at a 6th grade+ level. I know people say that having a multiple subject credential allows you to teach Prek-8th grade, but that's not what I want to teach. And if a school ever tried to move me to a higher grade, I'd leave that school. I got my degree in Child Development specifically because I enjoy educating the little ones. I also feel it's unfair to base intelligence solely on an exam. I worked hard throughout my life, and to have it all based on me passing the Subtest II seems unjustified. Also, Liberal Studies graduates are waived from the CSETS all together. They had the luxury to have a teacher and assignments backing them up. I passed all my math courses throughout school and college, and that was due to not being pressured and left alone to study without any support. If I had an instructor and had a semester to pass math, then I would not have any problems.
     

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