How long at a school?

Discussion in 'General Education' started by 1stGradeRocks, Aug 5, 2011.

  1. 1stGradeRocks

    1stGradeRocks Comrade

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    How long do you think you have to teach at a school before you are truly respected and not viewed as the new person?
     
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  3. TeachinHicks

    TeachinHicks Comrade

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    I think it depends on your school. My team gave me respect my first year and I really felt like part of the school family. Last year was my 3rd year there and I was grade level chair and was asked to be again this year. My P even had me help interview for a position that suddenly came open on our team during the year.
     
  4. 5throx

    5throx Rookie

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    At my school it is immediately after hire! I was the newbie on my team last year, and I never once felt like anyone treated me any different because I was new. Everyone at the school immediately accepts newcomers as valuable team members. It's a very supportive, extremely collaborative environment.
     
  5. bandnerdtx

    bandnerdtx Aficionado

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    It really does depend on the school and its climate. I am one of those people that likes to take on leadership roles, so I settle in pretty quickly. Can you do something like that at your school? Sponsor a club? Join a committee?

    At my current school, just about all of us opened the building 5 years ago. It was a neat feeling to all be new and create our traditions together.
     
  6. Mrs.SLF

    Mrs.SLF Comrade

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    I think it definitely depends on your school. I've taught for a number of years but am at a new school this year but my school has such a great adult culture that I'm definitely respected now (as is everyone in my building). And I just love my new school! :)
     
  7. HWilson

    HWilson Comrade

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    As eveyone else stated it really does depend on your school. When I was first hired at my school (3 days before the students returned) It was my first year, I missed most of the team work and activities. The teacher in my position was "riffed" to my school and was offered to return to her old school so she did. So coming in late etc it was obvious I was the new person becasue of the situation. I will never forget I was terrified bc the first encounter with anyone on my team (other than the team leader in the interview) didn't even acknowledge or speak to me. Then 30 minutes later they called for staff to report to a faculty meeting and as I was walking there I passed 2 teachers that literally looked me up and down as they were passing, didn't speak or smile or anything. I turned and looked and after they walked passed me they gave each other "a look". Thank goodness for my team leader!! She gave me a little welcome gift, ran in and hugged me and told me how happy she was I took the position!! That made all the difference b/c I honostly was not feeling welcomed at all. Needless to say she and I became very close and are really good friends now. (She is no longer my team leader). The "unwelcoming" people are no longer at my school and I put in all the effort now to welcome new teachers and make them feel at home..... Overall my school is ok at accepting newbies. Could be better but could be worse. My team is very good at treating 1st year and 20 year veterens the same and equal!! Which is great!!!!!!
     
  8. waterfall

    waterfall Maven

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    Last year was my first year and I can honestly say I felt respected and not like the "newbie" within a month. Once I proved I knew my stuff, being a "newbie" was no longer relevant to how people viewed me as a teacher.
     
  9. smalltowngal

    smalltowngal Multitudinous

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    It depends on the school/district. When I was an aide, I immediately felt like one of the team. When I switched to a teaching position in a neighboring town in the high school....well, it took awhile and I STILL don't feel like part of the team. Of course we have a few new people so that might change when we actually get in there.
     
  10. pwhatley

    pwhatley Maven

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    It depends upon the school. At the first school at which I taught, I felt separate and unworthy the entire year. I am now entering my 3rd year at my current school, and I have been treated as a professional and equal since day 1.
     
  11. Ron6103

    Ron6103 Habitué

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    My school is TERRIBLE about this. Many veteran teachers have the mindset that if you're not outright from the community, or have lived/worked there for at least a decade or so, your opinion has no value. I'd been outright told multiple times "you don't know how things go here, wait a few more years, then make suggestions".

    When in my 3rd year at the school I was placed on the Building Leadership team, and worked on the construction of the master schedule of courses, many were literally furious. Several went to the school board to demand my termination because "rookies cannot be given that kind of authority. it's just dangerous and reckless!". *sighs*
     
  12. dgpiaffeteach

    dgpiaffeteach Aficionado

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    I'm going into my first year at a very small school. We have one teacher for each grade PreK-6 and then two or three teachers per subject area 7-12. They hired 7 or 8 new teachers this year so I'm hoping it will be easy since a lot of the staff will be new plus we have a new P too! The other English teacher called me the other day and seemed very welcoming and friendly. It's only his second year teaching and he even said, "I remember how stressed I was at this time last year so whatever I can help you with, just let me know!" That made me feel so much better! He's the only other English teacher so I'm looking forward to working with him!
     
  13. queenie

    queenie Groupie

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    I think it depends on a lot of things. First of all, I believe it might be more difficult to be accepted in a middle or high school than in an elementary- and, perhaps, more difficult in a larger school than a smaller one. Although smaller schools are sometimes so close knit that it's hard to "break into the group." Also, your personality has something to do with it. I've noticed that teachers who seem more confident and outgoing are accepted more quickly than those (like me) who tend to be more quiet and introverted at first. It also depends on the current group of teachers and the overall work environment. This will be my fifth year at the same school and my first year I felt like a complete outsider. It has gotten better each year and I think my third year teaching was when I actually felt like I belonged there. My school is a small rural school (about 250 students) in a very close-knit community. The teachers my first year included SEVERAL long time veterans who had been at the school for a long time. Now, out of 12 teachers, only 5 of the original teachers remain. So most of us are newbies =) I feel like I'm an integral part of the school now, and have for a couple years I guess. But it took about 2 or three years for me to feel that way.
     
  14. queenie

    queenie Groupie

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    BTW, it's not that anyone was rude or mean to me in any way. It's just that no one really offered to help out with anything- I had to find my way and figure things out by myself, and I often felt like I was being talked down to ("you'll soon find out how things are around here", etc.) or ignored.
     
  15. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    I think it also depends on the teacher and their attitude. We have one teacher who is often still thought of as "new", although she has been at the school longer than I have. She is unwilling to take on new challenges, becomes visually and vocally distressed when every child in her class isn't 'perfect', complains about the workload, etc. She isn't making attempts to grow as a teacher, and that impacts how she is perceived. Contrast that with a brand-new teacher who pushes up their sleeves and jumps right in, never complains and is eager for new challenges; we don't think of him as a 'new teacher'.
     
  16. katrinkakat

    katrinkakat Connoisseur

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    I was at a new school three years in a row, so I felt like the new kid on the block, just because it's tough learning where everything is, who everyone is, and how everything works. By the time I knew my way around, I moved to another school. Thankfully I've been at school #3 starting my third year now. Hooray! I definitely feel like a local now, especially because we have 5 new teachers! :D
     
  17. BioAngel

    BioAngel Science Teacher - Grades 3-6

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    We have 3 new teachers at my school this year, so I'm hoping I no longer feel like the newbie. I'm a newer teacher (only been teaching for 3 years) and I was brand new last year, so that was scary :) Everybody (except one person) is very nice to me (I think that one person doesn't like me because I took her co-worker/friend's position), but hopefully this year I'll fit in more.
     
  18. Mrs.SLF

    Mrs.SLF Comrade

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    I feel so very fortunate to be working at a school that places actually being a team and cultivating our adult culture as an important part of meeting our school's mission to our scholars. The last two weeks at my new school has honestly been eye opening. It has inspired me to think about the future and seeing how our methods can be translated on a larger scale at more schools. I wish everyone good luck this year and I hope those feeling "new and undervalued" find their place and niche at their perspective schools. :)
     
  19. Opal

    Opal Companion

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    This year will be my first year back in the classroom after a seven year maternity leave.

    Luckily, my new school is just that - brand spankin' new! We are all "new" to each other, and after last week's training, I feel that we will all be working together quite well. My team is just fantastic and I am looking forward to working with them this year.
     
  20. Ms. I

    Ms. I Maven

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    I think the start of one's 3rd yr, maybe even the 4th, is about when the newbie's "proven themselves" to colleagues, the P, etc., NOT that it should be that way. But, many times, the staff wants to see what this new person can do, how they contribute to & enhance the staff, etc. Some people can get pretty "territorial" about their school.
     
  21. carrieSAtoUSA

    carrieSAtoUSA Rookie

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    That's AWFUL!!! Those are the types of people who are not there for the right reasons .. they have just been there forever and feel that it's their right to say and do what they please. I am so sorry! You just stick to your guns and do and say what you feel is right for you and your kids. You were obviously seen by administration as one whose input was valuable, when working on the schedule, so go with that and don't let the rest worry you.

    Good luck for this school year.
     
  22. MATgrad

    MATgrad Groupie

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    I think some of it also depends upon your position in the school. If you teach something where you may be the only one like band, drama, etc then I can see it taking a really long time. Since I'm usually the last to know anything I don't feel like an accepted member of the faculty at times but hey I'm there to teach kids so whatever.
     
  23. traveler

    traveler Comrade

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    I was definitely not wanted the first year. I made a huge switch from 8th grade to lower elementary. My "team" told me they didn't think I would do a good job. The school was not supportive. The P was not nice to me. I wanted to leave after the first year. I had to prove myself to me and to the other teachers. I stuck with it though and I'm now entering my 4th year and things are much better. I'm now someone who many of the teachers come to for advice on technology and other things.
     
  24. princessbloom

    princessbloom Comrade

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    Last year was my first year and I felt respected. I think it also depends on the person and how well that "newbie" contributes to the team. I'm going on my 2nd year and I still feel like I have so much to learn but I ask questions when needed and I contribute to the activities and lessons we come up with.

    I found I had the most problems with parents who really wanted to test my "newbie" status. I found it difficult to earn their respect the most.
     
  25. Marci07

    Marci07 Devotee

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    I agree with the previous posts. It depends on the school and also on the personality and/or attitude of the new teacher. I've been at 3 different schools and the circumstances at each one of them could have easily put me on the "bad" list with teachers but I decided to have an attitude of "I'm here to be a team player and help at anything I can". I didn't let some teacher's negativity get to me and I jumped at any chance to help them if they needed help.

    For example, last year I came to a new school because I knew the principal and I replaced a veteran teacher who was very good friends with the teachers in my team and was moved to 2nd grade. You can imagine the tension at the beginning of the year. There were some teachers who stayed away from me and were hesitant to hang out with me. I just did my job and volunteered to offer my help. Some teachers needed help with their promethean boards or with their computers so I helped. Little by little they began to trust me and I don't feel any hostility at all.

    Before becoming a teacher I was a customer care liaison and I had to deal with difficult people at my job. I learned how to see past negativity and turn that around with some people.
     
  26. Emily Bronte

    Emily Bronte Groupie

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    Aug 8, 2011

    My team was really supportive my first year. But, it was a really small team. I was one of 4 teachers. Now we are a team of 10 and I can see how some of the veterans who have been there since the beginning treat newer members. They are now more quick to judge, etc.
     

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