How is processing speed measured for kids?

Discussion in 'Special Education' started by WaterfallLady, Oct 26, 2009.

  1. WaterfallLady

    WaterfallLady Enthusiast

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    Oct 26, 2009

    I am working on post school planning for some of my kids and I have a really puzzling high school senior. She does great on everything she tries and is even pulling As in algebra. She comes off as mentally challenged in her speaking and actions though.

    I checked her IQ because I was trying to figure out what kind of training she could handle post school. I really figured she was cognitively challenged and just did well in schoolwork as many of my kids do. Her IQ is above 100, I think it was 108.

    Her processing speed is in the 0.1 percentile (not 1 percentile). How is that measured and how would it affect her?

    I don't like looking at IQ scores because in all honesty, a lot of times they don't tell me a lot about kids!
     
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  3. swansong1

    swansong1 Virtuoso

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    Oct 26, 2009

    She may come off as mentally challenged because her processing deficits make her take longer to respond to things. When someone says something to her or gives her an instruction, it will take a lot longer for her brain to process the information and respond. As you can see, that processing deficit does not affect her intelligence. I hope she has an IEP in place so she can receive modifications when she goes to college. With help, she will be an excellent student.
     
  4. Emily Bronte

    Emily Bronte Groupie

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    Oct 26, 2009

    Processing speed is in with the IQ subtests.
     
  5. WaterfallLady

    WaterfallLady Enthusiast

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    I teach at a special ed. school so thats taken care of :) She really is an excellent student. She's the sweetest kid to be around.

    Processing speed is just about the only aspect of testing I have no clue about. Thanks :)
     
  6. 3Sons

    3Sons Enthusiast

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    Oct 26, 2009

    IQ typically includes processing speed as part of the measure, so if her overall is 108 (about a half standard deviation above normal), then some of the other measures may be considerably higher to make up for the processing speed.

    It would surely affect speech -- I'm not sure what you mean by her actions seeming mentally challenged, though.

    It's probably best not to look at IQ scores all that much, though they can reveal surprising information at times.
     
  7. swansong1

    swansong1 Virtuoso

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    I have a couple of students like her. Just the sweetest, most loving children to ever enter my classroom!
     
  8. bros

    bros Phenom

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    It's basically how the brain processes things.

    The student could have difficulty processing what people are saying, then have difficulty with expressive language, so they come off slow, when they aren't.
     
  9. Sam Aye M

    Sam Aye M Mr. Know-It-All

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    Oct 26, 2009

    Processing speed on the WISC is measured with two subtests called coding and symbol search. With coding, you are basically "coding" a bunch of numbers from a key, as if you were trying to break a code of a secret message with a key. In symbol search, you look to see if a particular symbol is present,and mark yes or no. Both tests are timed.

    If her PSI is at the 0.1 percentile, I would guess that it just takes her more time to learn things, to do things, or to grasp the idea of things. It measures a number of things, including working memory, short term memory, visual motor coordination and visual motor discrimination. Also, the PSI subtests are the only ones that require pencil and paper participation, so if she has issues with visual motor coordination, that would also cause her PSI to end up pretty low.

    As for IQ scores telling you a lot about kids, you're right, they're mostly useless when just looking at the FSIQ. The best information comes from the interpretation of the scores, such as why her PSI came out so low, but still had an FSIQ that was in the average to above average range. YOu should look at the psychologists interpretation of her IQ test to learn more about what her strenghts and weaknesses are, which will hopefully help you to plan for her future.
     

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