How important is a grade

Discussion in 'Job Seekers' started by newbee, Dec 11, 2008.

  1. newbee

    newbee Rookie

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    Dec 11, 2008

    I am hoping that some of you can give me an insight of this question that popped up in another teacher's site.
    Are all the teachers in this country straight A students?If a person has a passion for teaching and had a good knowledge on the subject matter that they want to teach-will that stop him or her to become a teacher because he/she wasn't a stright A student? Ofcourse inorder to be a teacher, you will also have to pass the licensing test-which itself will tell if you have the knowledge and capacity to teach. Doesn't that itself say-if you are capable of teaching?
    I do believe that getting great grades is a wonderful thing and you can be what ever you want.
    I have seen so many average students in my life, who have done so wonderful in their field even though they were average students.
    I maybe wrong. But I am very baffled by the fact that how one is judged by his or her grade to become something they have passion for.
     
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  3. smalltowngal

    smalltowngal Multitudinous

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    Not ALL teachers were straight A students. I was in HS but not in college.
     
  4. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    I would be very surprised if MOST or even MANY teachers were straight-A students.

    As to the tests, some do test teaching skill, but the MTEL exams are primarily designed to test subject-area knowledge (which is also extremely important). That's the case in most states as well - and a passing score is generally between about 55% and 75% of available points (which would be a D to an F in most college courses).
     
  5. newbee

    newbee Rookie

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    Exactly my point. One need not be a straight A student to become any teacher. I bought this topic only because in an another teachers chatroom, someone-mostlikely a college student, was asking if becoming a math teacher will be the right job for her. She also mentioned that she had a hard time in math during her grammar school years, but got interest in math after learning from a current math teacher. For this another person replied that if one cannot be a straight A student, they have no business to become a teacher.
    I totally disagree. I believe that as long as one knows the subject matter and loves to teach-they have all the right to become a teacher.
    During my school days, I averaged between A- and B. So this guy says I am unfit to become one and that this is the reason why our school system is failing.
    I believe in the fact that if one can pass their praxis or mtel, that itself shows they have the knowledge to teach.
    I know when I get a teaching job, I will do everything possible to teach my student. No one is an expert in anything. They may be good. But we are all learners and we need to learn from others too.
    Thanks for all your input. I felt bad when that person commented that one cannot think of becoming a teacher because they are not straight A student. And I am very sure many teachers are not straight A.
     
  6. emmakate218

    emmakate218 Connoisseur

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    I think it's probably a good thing for schools to have a staff full of teachers that range from having been A students to F students. I think those that have failed or not done well in certain subjects make some of the best teachers. They can definitely be more understanding at times than those that always succeeded in a particular subject area.
     
  7. newbee

    newbee Rookie

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    Thanks for all your responses. I tell you, this site is far better to communicate than other sites-where I see only nerds.
    I feel so much better, that I am not alone in this opinion.
    I decided to myself, not even to think twice to go to that site.
    This site is more informative and helpful
     
  8. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Some of the best teachers are those who have had to struggle a bit for their grades.

    People to whom academics always come easy sometimes have a hard time understanding how a kid can "not get it." They realize it's possible, but don't really understand HOW it's possible.

    I worked with a math teacher like that once. The brightest kids LOVED her, because she kept them on her toes. The kids who struggled a bit HATED her, because she simply didn't have any patience for them.

    Having struggled a bit gives you more of a sense of empathy with those kids who struggle now and then.
     
  9. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Though the fact remains that teachers HAVE to know the material (I know you're not disputing the point, Alice) - and MTEL and Praxis and the like typically only scratch the surface.
     
  10. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Oh, and you KNOW that's one of my most favorite rants!!!

    I'm not talking about the teachers who can't write a coherent sentence. I'm talking about those who didn't get straight A's, or who had to break a serious sweat in order to get some of those A's.
     
  11. Sheba

    Sheba Companion

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    Did you know what any of your teachers' GPAs were? Ultimately it will come down to what your students and colleagues think of you, not a uni transcript. When I was a secondary school student all I needed to know was that if someone as stupid as Mr _____ or Mr ______ could get an education degree it had to be a fairly useless indicator of whether someone was very smart. The fact that Mrs _________ had an MA in her field and Mr _________ was working on his PhD were things that had very little relevance to me; but the fact that they were obviously way the hell smarter than the other two sure counted for a lot. In the end it will come down to how you come across to the students, parents, and co-workers.
     
  12. Bored of Ed

    Bored of Ed Enthusiast

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    I agree with TG that you have to know your stuff to teach it, but frankly I find many of the teachers who never struggled a day in their life easy to spot because they're so darn annoying. They're not ALL like that, of course, but I've had enough of the type who don't understand anything outside of their straight-A existence.
     
  13. tcherjen

    tcherjen Comrade

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    I was not an A student. I went back to finish school when my 2 year old was just 3 months old. I struggled with being a mom, interning and school work. I am graduating with a 3.5, not a 4.0. Hopefully it doesn't hurt me in the job field.
     
  14. monsieurteacher

    monsieurteacher Aficionado

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    I had a 3.6 (I think) and it wasn't even an issue. My school where I did my internship wanted me when I was done, and from there, it's all based on references. If you've got people that know you are a good teacher (especially people like my co-operating teacher was who are well-respected throughout the district) you are much better off than if you had a 4.0 GPA. I don't even think anyone looked at my grades.
     
  15. nasimi77

    nasimi77 Groupie

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    I struggled a lot in school. I surely was not a straight A student. It wasn't really until I got my license that I became serious about school. I think I even had ADD, back before it was a "known" thing to be diagnosed. My own struggles cause me to be that much more understanding towards the students who struggle, or who get easily bored, as I did. There's plenty of straight A teachers out there, I'm sure.....however not all make great teachers. As we know, there are many components to making a great teacher, and having always had good grades isn't IMHO the most important. At the same time, subject matter competency is important, so I don't advocate not knowing your subject either! ;)
     
  16. Brendan

    Brendan Fanatic

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    My GPA was a 3.8 in High School, I got As and Bs (well only As in History). I completely agree with Alice, having struggled in school helps you relate to students. In my Geo CP class, I can relate to my students when they strike a problem, because I had to work my a$$ of in math to get an A, it did not come easy to me.
     
  17. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    While I do not think that teachers need have been straight-A students, I ABSOLUTELY believe teachers should be smart people... (Grades are not always a reflection of intelligence!)
     
  18. trayums

    trayums Enthusiast

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    Ditto!
     
  19. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Absolutely.

    I've met one or two teachers along the way who have left me wondering about the quality of the education they provide for their kids.
     
  20. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    My grades were always good, although there are one or two C's on my university transcripts. I think that it is important for teachers to be intelligent people who are willing and eager to keep learning.
     

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