How hard is the Praxis® Core Academic Skills for Educators Tests (Praxis Core)?

Discussion in 'Basic Skills Tests' started by thesub, Sep 9, 2015.

  1. sugarpot

    sugarpot Rookie

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    Dec 1, 2015

    Hi
    Thank you for the tips
    I took the core 5732 and got 146 lost by 4 points. passed both reading and writing. Math is been hard for me always.
    Can you please suggest any websites guides,( I do have dummies and learningexpress) and if you can post examples that will be helpful
    Planning to re take it in 2 weeks
    Thank You
     
  2. ladysasuke

    ladysasuke Rookie

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    Update: Hello everyone, I am back after retaking the core math exam earlier today. I studied hard this time since the first time I took in September. I went to tutoring, re-did the math problems and bought the practice test from ETS website and from my book. I even brought the book with me to the testing center and spent a few minutes reviewing before going inside. I ran into a few problems that I couldn't for the life of me understand.

    The first 10 problems I found to be similar to my book so I breezed through them, but I stumbled during the geometry despite their only being a few of them on the exam. I finished with 20 minutes left on the clock and two marked questions. I went back to my marked questions and tried to solve them and with the remaining time, I rechecked and changed about 2-3 of my answers. I had seven minutes left when I submitted my test.

    I will be back tomorrow to update about my experience retaking the writing exam for the 3rd time.
     
  3. goodlife4545

    goodlife4545 Rookie

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    Did you pass the math test?
     
  4. goodlife4545

    goodlife4545 Rookie

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    First, can you post the breakdown of your math score. You can post it on here or message me. If you trying to take the test in two weeks, then you need to focus on your weakness. Like I mention in my other post, if you have a Algebra book, that is the best way to study for the test. You can also use Khan Academy and Youtube. The way I do it when I study is go through each problem and try to solve it myself. If I can not figure how to do it; I would look at the answer in the book. If I still do not understand, then I would Google the topic I am having trouble with.

    For now, the only thing I can do is wait for you to post your score and for you to tell me your strength and weakness.
     
  5. ladysasuke

    ladysasuke Rookie

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    I will admit that I was too scared to look when the score popped up on the screen so I didn't. I reported the score though so I will find out in a few more days.
     
  6. Vulcan_Klaatu

    Vulcan_Klaatu Rookie

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    Hello everyone. I passed the Praxis core on my first attempt, largely due to my usage of the Praxis Core For Dummies study guide. This guide contains simple, concise information, which is followed up with quizzes and contains two practice tests. In addition, there is an online component to this study guide, which contains many quizzes and three additional practice tests. This makes your studying experience highly interactive, which reinforces concepts and makes learning more active and fun (definitely utilize the online tool). Overall, the main thing that contributed to my passing score was maintaining a positive mentality: don't get discouraged if you get answers wrong on the quizzes and tests; those mistakes are invaluable opportunities to hone in on your weaknesses and to help you grow.
     
    Last edited: Dec 2, 2015
  7. goodlife4545

    goodlife4545 Rookie

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    I was thinking about buying that book. I believe my Praxis core book by learning Express is out of date. I am going to give that book a try and hope that i pass the test when I take it again next Month
     
  8. Vulcan_Klaatu

    Vulcan_Klaatu Rookie

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    I wish you luck in your teaching endeavors, Good Life. Live long and prosper.
     
  9. sugarpot

    sugarpot Rookie

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    Dec 5, 2015


    HI
    1. Number 10 of 15
    2. Algebra 6 of 15
    3. geometry 6 of 10
    4 statics 6 of 10
    I used the Learning express also I think its also out dated but they have online exam which I think its more advanced for core math.
    I started using Khan Academy but its hard for me to find the correct topics for me to practice on
    I have to start google
    Thank you
     
  10. sugarpot

    sugarpot Rookie

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    Hi
    I do Have the praxis for Dummies
    I am not able to get on to the online one I tried contacting customer service but no luck
    how do I get access to online
    Thank you
     
  11. sugarpot

    sugarpot Rookie

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    Have you tried this one

    mgmtutoring
    please suggest
    Thank you
     
  12. goodlife4545

    goodlife4545 Rookie

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    The number and Algebra usually count the most when it come to praxis exams. On Khan academy the pre-Algebra can be use for the Number section. I will have to look up a good website for the rest. You can use Khan Academy to study for the whole test but it would take to long to figure out which problem is actually on the the test. with Khan. Now if you have free time I do recommend trying the Algebra, and basic Geometry section
     
  13. ladysasuke

    ladysasuke Rookie

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    Hello again,

    I received my scores for the math part of the praxis. I received a 146 and needed a 150. I did better in Numbers, Algebra, and Statistics, but worse in Geometry.

    Numbers: 8
    Algebra: 8
    Geometry: 2
    Statistics: 7
     
  14. Vulcan_Klaatu

    Vulcan_Klaatu Rookie

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    Hello, sugarpot. In order to access the praxis core for dummies online component, I created an account at learndummies selecting praxis core for dummies as the course name. After this, I was prompted to enter the 16 digit access code (scratch off found on the inner front cover). Upon completing that step, I gained access to the site.

    I hope customer service can resolve the problem. Good luck with your educational endeavors, sugarpot.
     
  15. goodlife4545

    goodlife4545 Rookie

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    For the Geometry section. I would Google Basic Geometry formulas, or Geometry Cheat Sheets. If you can memorize those formulas. It should be easy when it come to solving the problem. For example we know the perimeter of a Square is 4s and the area of a square is s².
    Example
    If the area of a square is 64 what is the perimeter of the square? we know that the area =s²
    so, s²=64
    s=√64
    s=8
    Perimeter = 4s
    so,
    4*8=p
    p=32

    Example 2 If the diameter of a circle is 10 meters, what is the area of the circle?
    We know that area of circle = πr²
    radius=½diameter
    we have r=½10=5
    area of circle= π5² =25π

    Example 3 If the Area of circle is 25π what is it Circumference?
    like mention in the last example, area of circle is πr²
    The formulas for Circumference = 2πr or πd
    a=25π we know by the formula that to find the area you must square the r but we already have the area. To find out what r is we must take the square root of r
    r=5
    circumference = 2πr = 2π5= 10π

    They might ask if a triangle can be form given 3 length
    for example a=3, b=7 c=10
    in order for this to be true
    a+b>c
    a+c>b
    b+c>a

    3+7>10 false
    3+10>7 true
    7 + 10>3 true.
    This is not a triangle because 10 is not greater than 10
    now if you change b to equal 8 then it would be a triangle.
     
  16. ladysasuke

    ladysasuke Rookie

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    Thank you goodlife4546 for the advice. I tried to follow your examples, but the forth one lost me. What do you mean by form? What am I finding?

    Are 3, 7, 10, the sides of the triangle? I think the language of the question can throw me off as well.
     
    Last edited: Dec 6, 2015
  17. goodlife4545

    goodlife4545 Rookie

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    I did 4 examples do you mean the one with the circle or the one with the triangle.
    Yes 3, 7 and 10 are the sides. The best way to understand that example is to draw it. If drawn correctly, one of the sides will not touch.
    I did these questions off the top of my head, that is why it is not explain as well.

    I will also do some Algebra, Algebra geometry type questions and more Geometry questions too(slope, midpoint, area, etc.)
     
  18. Vulcan_Klaatu

    Vulcan_Klaatu Rookie

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    If I understood Goodlife's triangle example correctly, then we are asked to determine if a triangle can be formed given 3 lengths a=3, b=7 c=10. In order to solve this, we need to recognize that a triangle can be formed if the sum of two sides is greater than the value of the other, or as goodlife put it:
    1." a+b>c
    2. a+c>b
    3. b+c>a" Goodlife

    Based on our values: a=3, b=7, c=10:
    "3+7>10 false (this produces a false statement)
    3+10>7 true
    7 + 10>3 true." Goodlife

    The first sum (3+7 or a+b) of 10 equaled the value of c, which is ten. However, the (a+b) value must be greater than the c value of 10 in order to form a triangle. Therefore, a triangle cannot be formed from the three lengths good life provided, because our first test produced a false statement (10 is not greater than ten). However, a triangle could be formed if we let b=8, because this would produce a sum greater than ten in our first statement, along with producing true statements in the second and third tests, passing the three conditions posted by goodlife.

    Have I understood you correctly Goodlife?
     
    goodlife4545 likes this.
  19. goodlife4545

    goodlife4545 Rookie

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    Yes that is correct. Like I mention I did it on the fly, and i didn't want to make the thread to long.
     
  20. ladysasuke

    ladysasuke Rookie

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    Thanks for explaining Vulcan and goodlife. I will try and work on the geometry. Does anyone have any recommendations for a good praxis workbook. I have one that I brought earlier this year, but I believe it is outdated. It's called 'Praxis I: PPST - 4th Edition.
     
  21. Vulcan_Klaatu

    Vulcan_Klaatu Rookie

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    Hello, ladysasuke. I do not have any suggestions for a praxis workbook other than the problems in the praxis core for dummies and its online component, which contain plenty of quizzes and tests.

    Although it is not a praxis workbook, a very useful source for geometry (along with the other praxis math areas) is the following: go to youtube and type the username mathispower4u into the searchbox. Specifically, the following playlists (mathispower4u) may be relevant to your inquiry: triangles and congruence; geometry of parallel and perpendicular lines; intro to geometry basics.

    Also, on a side note, would it be helpful if fellow forumites post potential praxis math questions on here for you to practice (I still have access to my guide and its online component)?
     
    Last edited: Dec 6, 2015
  22. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Math via online video can be very effective: one can SEE the problem being worked out, and one can re-watch it as desired. If the videos are linked in some sequence, even better: if some bit of the explanation for math concept S just doesn't make sense, one can look backward in the sequence until one finds that bit featured. And if one source doesn't match one's style, one can search for others, on YouTube or elsewhere. Khan Academy, www.khanacademy.org, is pretty popular. There really is no such thing as the one right test-prep resource for everyone.

    One caution, though: questions that are part of a test-prep provider may be the intellectual property of that provider. Please adapt any questions posted - change the numbers, change the unknown, change the incidental details in the story problems enough that it stops looking like plagiarism. (Let me add that making up test questions is a great way to learn the content.)
     
  23. goodlife4545

    goodlife4545 Rookie

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    You said you use the learning express book. If we are using the same book, you can go through the practice test and tell me what question you are having a problem with and I can answer it for you or show my steps.
     
  24. Vulcan_Klaatu

    Vulcan_Klaatu Rookie

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    For math problems and difficulties, goodlife is an excellent source (I'm a humanities guy who enjoys math as a hobby, nothing more). His background in math, combined with his willingness to help others out, shows that he's a very valuable source in helping others sort out their difficulties and misunderstandings. I hope people take you up on your offer, Goodlife.
     
    Last edited: Dec 6, 2015
  25. goodlife4545

    goodlife4545 Rookie

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    I can make up math problems all day long. Message me the questions and I will edit it so that everyone can see it. I know most is having trouble with Geometry and Algebra. Just give me a direct topic, and I can have a questions made up within a few mins.

    I am hoping in the near future to get my M.A.T in Mathematics and my research area will be in testing or improving math overall. I would be more direct in my research area once I get closer to my degree.
     
  26. ladysasuke

    ladysasuke Rookie

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    I think I will take you up on your offer goodlife4545. I appreciate all the help I can receive.
     
  27. sugarpot

    sugarpot Rookie

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    How can I send a private message
     
  28. Vulcan_Klaatu

    Vulcan_Klaatu Rookie

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    Sugarpot, I'm actually asking the same question myself. Due to the fact that we are new members, we might not be able to send pms yet (just a guess though). On that note, after reviewing your posted breakdown, it looks like algebra was a problem. If you can work on getting that score up, then your chances of passing your next time around will greatly increase. Do you agree?

    IMO, if your algebra is strong, then you'll also be able to pick up some more points on geometry too.
    (please note, I made the following example up)

    For example, the Pythagorean theorem (right triangle) is a^2+b^2=c^2. Suppose we have two lengths: a=1, b=2. Find c using the Pythagorean theorem (remember we're looking for c not c^2)?

    Also suppose we have two lengths: a=4, c=5. Find the value of b (you'll need to rearrange the Pythagorean theorem via algebra in order to solve for b
     
  29. sugarpot

    sugarpot Rookie

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    Thanks for your reply
    I am ok with pythagorean theorem
    my issue is slope and function
    Do we need to know quadratic equation I am lost on that too

    area and volume and ets I think I will make it if I remember the formulas
     
  30. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    To send another member a private message (PM), it's generally easiest to start by finding a public post by that member and clicking on the member's username in the little box to the left of the message: a box will pop up with the user's name etc. If there's a link labeled "Start a Conversation", it's true that (a) you can send private messages (PMs) and (b) the other member is willing to receive them. (I think it's still the case that a member can opt to block all PMs.) Both Vulcan and sugarpot can receive PMs, though I don't know yet whether either can initiate them.

    The Pythagorean theorem is indeed where geometry and algebra meet, especially in basic-skills teacher tests, and it's very popular with test makers. A couple of handy hints:
    1. The Pythagorean theorem works only with a right triangle. (To be precise, a^2 + b^2 = c^2 only if the triangle is a right triangle. If a^2 + b^2 > c^2, the hypotenuse (c or long side) is too short for a right triangle, so the triangle is acute, which means all angles < 90°; if a^2 + b^2 < c^2, the hypotenuse is too long for a right triangle and the triangle is obtuse.)
    2. On basic-skills tests, especially tests that don't allow calculators, Pythagorean-theorem questions usually involve Pythagorean triples, which are trios of integers that satisfy the theorem: the most common triple is 3, 4, 5 (that is, the triangle's sides are 3, 4, and 5, or 6, 8, and 10, or 1.5, 2, 2.5, or 30, 40, 50, or... you get the idea).
    3. If the question involves two triangles, even if both are right triangles, the chances are pretty good that the Pythagorean theorem is the wrong tool: the problem is better solved with a proportion.
     
  31. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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  32. Vulcan_Klaatu

    Vulcan_Klaatu Rookie

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    Gotcha. Thanks for your reply, sugarpot. I do not recall seeing the quadratic equation on my particular praxis core math test (the praxis core for dummies did not mention it either). Sugar, regarding slope and function, I'm going to post a few examples. If these are too easy, could you please specify what it is about the slope and functions that are unclear for you?

    Please note, in asking the following questions, I'm attempting to uncover any areas that may be unclear (my intent is not to quiz you). If these questions are not accomplishing this, please let me know. Thanks.

    Example One (slope):

    The basic formula for a slope is (y2-y1)/(x2-x1). The point slope formula is y-y1=m(x-x1) (please note the slope is m)

    Examples: suppose we have two points (0,1) or (x1,y1) and (1,3) (x2,y2). Then, using the slope formula, (3-1)/(1-0)=2/1 or 2, which is the slope. Suppose we have a point (1,1) or (x1,y1) and a slope of 2. Then via the point slope formula, y-1=2(x-1). Next, distribute the 2 on the right side to obtain y-1=2x-2. Finally, add one to both sides of the equation to obtain y=2x-1.

    a) Two points, (1,2) and (6,7), are located on the line y=mx + 1. What is the slope of the line?
    b) The slope of a line is 3 and a point on the line is (3,1). What is the equation of the line?
    c) Two points on a line are (-1,3) and (2,6). What is the equation of the line? (hint. first find the slope then use the point slope formula)
    d) y=x/2 + 1. What is the y intercept? Are (2,2) and (4,3) points on the line? Why?

    Example Two (function)

    According to the definition of a function, it is a relation where each x value (domain) is paired with only one y value (range). Put another way, different x values can have the same y value; however, a single x value cannot have more than one y value.

    a) Which of the following relations is a function?

    1) [(1,2), (3,4), (5,6), (5,-9)]
    2) [ (0,1), (4,1), (2,3), (33,72)]
    3)[ (0,2), (5,3), (5,7), (8,11)]

    b) The relation,[ (0,1), (2,3), (2,-3)], is not a function because?

    c) f(x)=x^2+3x-5
    find f(3)?

    Please let me know if this is useful, Sugarpot. If not, could you give me more specifics? Thanks and have a good night.
     
    Last edited: Dec 8, 2015
  33. goodlife4545

    goodlife4545 Rookie

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    Sugarpot when you took the practice test on the Praxis website, what did you make?
     
  34. goodlife4545

    goodlife4545 Rookie

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    Also, have you heard of quick study cards? If not, google "Quick Study math" You can buy one at any book store and on Quick study cards they have examples
     
  35. sugarpot

    sugarpot Rookie

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    Not well I took in was in January I bought the study guide for 90 days only used it 2 times
    is there other test in ets site?
     
  36. sugarpot

    sugarpot Rookie

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    Dec 8, 2015

    Thank you
    I am bit confused about the slope formula I get confused when I work on a problem on practice tests
    F(X) problem I am ok with that one now just repalce 3 for x and slove

    relation its you can not have 2 of the same value
    The relation,[ (0,1), (2,3), (2,-3)], is not a function because?
    you have 2 at both x values
    does it go same for y also


    What type of geometry problem should I foucs on
    Volume, area
    do I need to know for all shapes
    Thank you
     
  37. Vulcan_Klaatu

    Vulcan_Klaatu Rookie

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    Thank you for your response, Sugarpot. The relation [ (0,1), (2,3), (2,-3)] is not a function because the x value of 2 has two different y values. In order for a relation to be a function, each individual x value must have one y value only. For example, the following relation [(5,6), (6,8), (7,10)] is a function because each x value has exactly one y value. Think of a function like a legal monogamous marriage: each x value must have only one spouse (the y value), which produces a function (or a legal marriage); if the x value has multiple y values (or spouses) then the relation is not a function (it is an illegal marriage). Thus, the relation [(5,6) (5,7), (6,8)] is not a function (not a legal marriage), because the x value of 5 has two y values (or two spouses; 6 & 7 are not going to be happy when they find out about each other).

    In terms of geometry problems, The Pythagorean theorem is definitely important, so if you’ve got that down, then you should be good to go. In addition, I would suggest knowing the area of the following shapes: circle, triangle, rectangle and square, and trapezoid. Also know the perimeter of a rectangle (P=2l+2w) and the circumference of a circle (c=2*(pi)*r or c= (pi)*d). In addition, know the surface area and volume formulas for the following shapes: Rectangular solid or prism [surface area=2*(base area) + (base perimeter)*(height of prism); volume=l*w*h] , cylinder, cone, and sphere. Don't be scared by these equations; knowing them could help you pick up some points (unless you feel extremely confident and expeditious, tackle these at the end, as they can potentially be time drainers).

    * There may be one question on this, but knowing the volume and and surface area of a pyramid may also be useful (pyramids on the praxis core will have a square base). Surface area=base area +1/2*( base perimeter)*(slant height), and volume= 1/3*(base area)*(height of pyramid). A good way to envision slant height is to imagine an equilateral triangle (a typical face on a pyramid). If we divide it into two right triangles, then the hypotenuse (the longest leg) of one of our right triangles will be the slant height. Hence, the Pythagorean theorem plays a crucial role in determining slant height.


    *Please note that base area and base perimeter simply mean finding the normal area or perimeter of a prism's base. For example the base area of a rectangular solid is the area of one of its rectangular faces or simply length*width. The base perimeter of a rectangular solid is the perimeter of one of its rectangular faces or 2*length + 2*width.

    Regarding the slope, the basic formula is (y2-y1)/(x2-x1). For example, lets say that (y2-y1) is our vertical motion and (x2-x1) is our horizontal motion. When we divide both of them, it will tell us how much our vertical motion (jumping up and down) is changing in relation to our horizontal motion (skipping sideways).

    For example, lets say we have two points (0,1) and (1,2) and we want to know how the vertical motion (y2-y1) is changing in relation to the horizontal motion (x2-x1). First, before we even set the problem up, lets recognize which variables are x1,x2,y1,y2. Since (0,1) contains lesser values than (1,2), I’m going to make (0,1) our first point. So 0=x1 and 1=y1. Next, since (1,2) is our second point, then 1=x2 and 2=y2. Next, since the slope= (y2-y1)/(x2-x1), we can now plug in our respective numbers and solve for the slope: (2-1)/(1-0)=1/1 or 1. So are slope is equal to 1.

    Again, please let me know if I’m being useful. You will not hurt my feelings if I have failed to be clear. Thanks sugarpot.

    P.S Would you like me to work through and explain some of the problems I posted? Take care.
     
    Last edited: Dec 10, 2015
  38. sugarpot

    sugarpot Rookie

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    Dec 10, 2015

    Thank you very much for all this I have to remember all the formula. Made flash cards also included measurement. Your messages is pretty clear. Just have to go through one at a time
    Thank you
     
  39. sugarpot

    sugarpot Rookie

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    Dec 10, 2015



    Very good way to explain the function thank you I can remember that
     
  40. Vulcan_Klaatu

    Vulcan_Klaatu Rookie

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    Dec 10, 2015

    Thank you, Sugarpot. Your definitely right about measurement (metric system and English system). If you've got those straight, it can definitely help you pick up some points. You were so close to passing the last time. I think if your understanding of functions and slopes increases (definitely try to work more problems), then your algebra score will go up along with your overall score, provided you keep sharp with the other stuff (sounds like you've got that down). Good luck with your test and your future teaching endeavors. If you have any other questions, feel free to ask.
     

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