How far back should a resume go?

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Backroads, Apr 19, 2020.

  1. Backroads

    Backroads Aficionado

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    Apr 19, 2020

    Funnily enough, while Googling views on this subject I found a thread from here asking the same question but it was super old so...

    A new one.

    I'm updating my resume and realized my first teaching job ended over ten years ago, preceding a 4-year gap. I'm not worried about the gap, but it and the time make that first job seem somewhat on the ancient side.

    The general trend seems to be no older than 10-15 years unless it's really good stuff, and that job fits toward the 15 years.

    But in the teaching world, is it still relevant enough?
     
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  3. bella84

    bella84 Aficionado

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    Apr 19, 2020

    I think that any job in a particular field should be on the resume if you are looking for a job in that field. So, any teaching job should be on your resume if you are looking for a teaching job. You may not include as many bullet points for the older positions, but they should still be there. For one thing, at least in my state, districts have to report how many years of experience their teachers have. They actually request verification from your former school district employers so that they can be sure that you actually have the number of years of experience that you say you do. It also helps with salary schedule placement in those districts that are willing to give you credit for your experience. Now, if you used to put para, aide, or sub jobs on your resume and you've since gathered enough experience as a teacher, then you can probably take off those other roles, but all actual teaching experience should stay on your resume.
     
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  4. sevenplus

    sevenplus Connoisseur

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    Apr 19, 2020

    I would include any relevant job. A teaching job from 10 years ago is still relevant and really not that long ago. I would not call it ancient by any means.
     
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  5. RainStorm

    RainStorm Phenom

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    Apr 19, 2020

    I agree about only including recent and related job history on a resume. But I will say this, when I moved to Florida, every single district here that I applied for required an online application form. You could not be considered for a job without one of these forms completed. These applications insist (and I do mean insist) that you list every single job you have ever held from the time you started working (which for me was in high school) until the present day. They won't allow ANY time gap. So if you left a job in July but didn't start a new job until September, you actually have to put "Unemployed" from July 20xx-Aug 20XX. (or "in school" or "summer vacation from college" or "student teaching" -- whatever the explanation is.) The computer program will not allow any time gaps, and each job has to include the name of the company, the full address, and the name of your direct supervisor. You also had to put in a phone number, which is, of course, impossible for places that no longer exist. But the program won't let you leave that line blank. I ended up putting in my own phone number just so the line would be filled and the program would let me continue.

    When I did these application forms, I was 56 years old, so I had been working for 40 years! The place I worked in high school was closed and torn down at least 20 years ago. The old address doesn't even exist any more (it was in a mall, and the wall was torn down, the street was redesigned and renamed, at least 20 years ago.) Half of my "former supervisors" are deceased, and a large number of the rest are long retired. I had to put entries for every ten months period I was in college, and enter all the jobs I worked over the summer each year. And the stupid programs will not let you leave anything blank! And of course the program keeps reminding you that any omissions or incorrect information will be ground for dismissal should you be hired by the district. They absolutely will not accept your application until it is filled out completely -- so I had to account for every month that I had worked or gone to school since 1980! You can't imagine how time consuming this was.

    Oh, and you may not know this, but Social Security actually keeps a list of every company you have EVER received a pay check from (that submitted a W2 form,) since your social security number was issued. (It doesn't keep track of times you were an independent contractor.) You can order this list online from them -- there is a small cost of it, but it is invaluable if you have to go back and completely reconstruct your job history. (I actually ordered one for my Dad's social security number a few months before he passed away, and it was amazing to see where he had worked and how much he had made. He made 32 cents an hour at his first job.)

    It was the most ridiculous and time consuming thing I've ever had to do. I mean really, do you remember the name of your direct supervisor from a summer job you held 39 years ago? It was insane. But application forms like this are very commonplace in some areas.

    And the worst part is this is just a Human Resources requirement -- the people at the school district could care less about anything except your direct teaching experience -- but you still have to jump through the hoops, or HR won't send your resume over to the district to even be considered.
     
  6. RainStorm

    RainStorm Phenom

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    Apr 19, 2020

    I also had to get these "experience verification forms" done from every school district I've ever worked for. This is very common place now in larger districts, and new teachers were started on the lowest pay grade until these forms came in from all of your school districts -- then you were moved-up to the correct pay level if the forms verified it.

    I found it very frustrating because they also disallowed any "partial" years -- so if you started in the second week of school or right after student teacher, even if you were full-time and on contract, they disallowed that entire year of experience.

    In my new state, they also won't pay for more than 7 years previous experience anymore. So even if you have 20 years prior experience, you will be started at the pay level for 7 years of experience, so experienced teachers here always have to take a huge pay cut to teach in this state.
     
  7. ChildWhisperer

    ChildWhisperer Groupie

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    That's crazy. I remember interviewing for a district once (didn't take that job), but they even counted my years in daycare when telling me what my salary would be. I thought that was awesome because my very first job was in a daycare for about 5 years while going through grad school.
     
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  8. whizkid

    whizkid Groupie

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    Apr 19, 2020

    What everyone else said....
     
  9. RainStorm

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    Apr 19, 2020

    ChildWhisperer,
    I remember those days -- I had one school that counted my student teaching! That doesn't happen any more.

    It is even worse … I am near 3 districts.
    1. The closest -- they will only count up to 7 years experience, but none of that can be in private schools, charter schools, or partial years. They only pay $700 TOTAL for a master's degree. Seven years, with a Master's degree pays around $45,000. Mandatory that two nights per week, you work until 5pm (mandatory weekly staff meeting, and departmental planning meeting.) The cost of living here is not cheap. They use teaching scripts.
    2. The next county over has excellent schools and an excellent reputation. As of 2015, they do not pay for years of experience at all anymore! Everyone starts in as if they are a new teacher -- which is like $34,000! They offer a $5,000 addition for a Master's degree, but ONLY if it is directly related to your current job. So if you have a Master's in Curriculum Design, and you are a teacher -- no Master's pay for you! You could only get the pay for that if you were hired as a Curriculum Designer for the district. The cost of living there is more expensive than any place else around here -- tourist area, and very expensive. So yes, a teacher like me with almost 20 years experience and a Master's degree would be paid about $39,000. The rent on a two bedroom apartment in this area (not especially nice) would run about $1,800 per month, not including utilities.
    3. The farthest-away district is the best paying. Only 3 of their schools are actually close enough that I could commute there -- about a 30 minute commute each way. They pay full years of experience and have a Master's supplement. I would make about $10,000 more by working there, but the commute is long, and the schools within my commuting rate are 99% free- and reduced-, and about 80% ELLs, and pretty horrendous state scores. They also have constant staff turnover. They use scripted programs.
    And they wonder why they have a constant teacher shortage here! And did I mention that every single certified teacher in this state has to become endorse in ESL and all elementary teachers must also become endorsed as a Reading Specialist within the next 4 years, or they cannot renew their certification. Each endorsement requires 5 college courses. (Many schools will pay the cost for it, but you still have to show up and do all the work for it...and that is exhausting after working a full day at school.)
     
  10. whizkid

    whizkid Groupie

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    Apr 19, 2020

    That is criminal.
     
  11. waterfall

    waterfall Virtuoso

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    Apr 19, 2020

    I agree with the advice to list any teaching job, but perhaps less bullet points for older positions. After a few years I had "real" experience to cover everything I did in ST, so I took that off. When I was starting off, I had a larger section for teaching ESY/summer school because I'd only had one real teaching job at that point.

    A few years ago when I was applying with like 8 years of experience, I only had big sections for my 3 actual teaching jobs and then had a section at the bottom that said "additional experience. " Then I just bullet listed other things I'd taught with the grade level and year. I figured it showed I had a range of experiences but I didn't need to go into detail about summer teaching and whatnot at that point. For example, "Summer School, Grade 2, Summer 2014" Reading Tutor, Grade 4, 2014-2015 School Year."

    Our applications here also require you to list any job you've ever had, even in HS, with your bosses name and contact info. I always just googled the organization and put the main phone number. I don't think my lifeguard boss from 15 years ago is available to give a reference :rolleyes:.

    They also don't pay you for experience past a certain point here. The most I'm aware of is our big city district which will pay for 11 years. My district is 8, as are most others. Some of the "best" (wealthiest) districts are 5 years because they know they can get away with it/people will still apply there.
     

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