How does yours work?

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by teach2read10, Jul 26, 2009.

  1. teach2read10

    teach2read10 Companion

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    Jul 26, 2009

    How does your take home reading program work? How do you handle parents who don't seem to want to be involved? It seems like the students who could most benefit from extra reading at home are often the ones we can't get excited about reading with their parents.
     
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  3. teacherlissa

    teacherlissa Comrade

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    Jul 26, 2009

    My students have to read for twenty minutes then respond on a weekly homework response sheet. They can read whatever they want as long as it is on their reading level and they haven't read it 15 times already. I did have a response booklet but shortened it to a small response...just a couple of sentences. They write the title of the book, minutes read, response sentences and parent signature.

    Alot of parents like it but by December they are super bored (I don't blame them)...so I switch to math homework because they need extra practice by then.
     
  4. 2inspire

    2inspire Companion

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    Jul 26, 2009

    Mine doesn't work :D and let me rephrase that-our school/home reading program doesn't work. I only do it b/c we have to. I feel very strongly about grading a student on a parent's preformance and there is no way we can hold parents accountable.

    So when Chris doensn't have a parent at his house until 12:30 am and has to get himself up to school in the morning there is no one helping him read (cause heaven knows he can't do it on his own) or sign his sheet. But he recievs the below grade level grade and/or completes reading minutes at reward recess.

    Kat's mom has her so overbooked she just fills out the sheet for her. Perfect handwriting and everything. I'm more than sure Kat can read that much a night if she didn't have a million and one other things going on but oopps...there goes her PDA she's late for fencing class.

    Lance's mom couldn't care less but Lance wants to do well in school so mom just fills it out for the month and has Lance turn it in on the first of the month/week for all the reading he's going to do.

    Yeah...I changed the names of the kids but those are all scenarios I delt with last year.
     
  5. teach2read10

    teach2read10 Companion

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    Jul 26, 2009

    Teacherlissa

    Doing take home Reading for part of the year and switching to Math is a great idea. I never thought about the parents getting bored.
     
  6. greengables

    greengables Rookie

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    Jul 27, 2009

    Anyone have a problem with not getting books back? I let my kiddos check out books from my classroom to take home and read. Most were returned, but I had a few that got lost and the parents couldn't afford to replace them. I'm alittle worried about doing it again this year.
     
  7. teach2read10

    teach2read10 Companion

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    Jul 27, 2009

    Greengables

    I only send home books i am willing to never see again. The kids who are most likely to lose a book are often the ones whose parents are least likely to replace the book. i don't want to put any student in a situation where take home reading is a negative experience.
     
  8. greengables

    greengables Rookie

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    Yes, I agree. Unfortunately, I don't want to lose ANY of them;). And I don't blame the students, they always feel so bad, moreso than some of the parents! But it does get expensive, so I'm torn about offering the option this year.
     
  9. Lionteacher

    Lionteacher Companion

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    Jul 27, 2009

    My kids just read for 20 minutes at home. The fill out a log and the parents initial or sign it.
     
  10. jenejoy

    jenejoy Companion

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    Jul 28, 2009

    I didn't let my first graders take home my books, but I did let my 3rd graders and will be doing so again this year. I think it is especially important with chapter books. Anyways, we use charater counts at our school and we talk alot about respect and responsiblity. I allow students to take books home mon to thrs. not on the weekend, more seems to get lost on weekends. They also have to return the book the following day. They may recheck it out if they haven't finished it by the end of the day. If they forget or for any other reason don't bring it back they owe me recess until they bring it back. Typically the next day. If they are unable to find it at all (has only happened 3 times I think). They need to either buy the same book or if it is no longer easily found I will let them buy a book from the same level out of our next book order. There was one time that the parents were unable to afford the book at all though and we did work it out that the student did extra work to pay off his debt to me after school. Which worked out well because I was able to give him work that he really needed extra practice with and I would pay a small amount into a jar for him until it was enough to buy the book from the book order. He was so proud of the book that he bought because he really felt like he had righted the situation. But like i said those incidents were few and far between.
     
  11. CiniMini

    CiniMini Rookie

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    Jul 28, 2009

    We have a nightly fluency folder that the kids are expected to read for 1 minutes and have an adult sign it. About 50% do it right. About 25% of parents just write down a number and sign it but the kids don't read. The remaining 25% do nothing with it. I can't imagine not wanting to take 1 minute out of your life to read with your 1st grader.
     
  12. mom2ohc

    mom2ohc Habitué

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    Jul 28, 2009

    my kids in second grade used to read one chapter book a week, then fill out a log for it. They had a choice of about 12 different questions to answer for their reading. It worked very well. If they forgot their log, they had to stay in and read with me at recess. No one likes to do that.

    We called it the Reading Challenge.

    The questions were something like this
    • name your favorite part and tell why you liked it
    • List all the characters and who you like the most
    • Or list the character that is most like you.
    • List three words that you learned or that were new words to read, and copy the sentences from the book.
    • Tell me the setting and why it was important to the story
    • Compare the story to another story that you know
    • copy dialogue from the book with the correct punctuation
    • who do you know that would like this book and why?
    • tell me three clues from the story (mystery)
    • illustrate your favorite part

    the kids liked this, the parents liked it, and I was able to guide the students to reading chapter books that were appropriate for their level. It was very successful for me for the last few years.
     
  13. kinderdl

    kinderdl Rookie

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    Jul 28, 2009

    I teach Kinder and well this year we were a little more strict with parents (I know that this sounds harsh) but we really wanted the children to be prepared for first grade. We did start with the usual letter of the week, sounds, brainstorming words etc. But instead of waiting until Jan. to begin reading groups we started in sept. I know this sounds early. In addition, we divided up the pre primer and primer sight word lists into months. I teach the spanish part so I just used the spanish words. We would list about 20 to 22 words a month for the children to learn in addition to the book that they took home weekly. At the end of the month, the children would have a test to see if they had learned the words for the month. You would not believe that our little Kinder students learned 25 sight words a month which helped them become much better readers. We also used a little book that we made that incorporated sight word and blending words together and the children had to master this story every week. It took them a little bit but by november we could really see this was going to work. By May all of the children were reading, and 21 out of 22 students were able to recognize 126 sight words. We were so proud of their hard word they recieved a trophy at the ceremony. It sounds like a lot of work, but our team sat down talked about what our goals were and we all put in an effort for this. We have added another element to it this year and we are going to see how that goes. For you spanish teachers, this works just as well for SLA, just the kids read syllables instead of initial sounds. Hope this helps someone, it really made a difference for us this year.

    And the end of the month test really had the parents working with thier children cause the kids were quite motivated themselves, and they are only 5. If anyone needs any other explanations, I will be glad to share.
     

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