How does your school system handle extended school year?

Discussion in 'Special Education' started by ecteach, Sep 7, 2013.

  1. ecteach

    ecteach Devotee

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    Sep 7, 2013

    We don't do it. Yes, I know that is against the law, but we really don't do it. We have been told to never mention the option of extended school year to a parent. It's a box on the IEP and we just check that they aren't eligible for it. I am assuming no parent has ever fought against this.

    So, how does your school system handle ESY? Technically it's for students who will regress a lot without instruction over long breaks of time, but I have seen IEP's from counties that had no documentation about why that child is receiving ESY.
     
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  3. JustMe

    JustMe Virtuoso

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    Sep 7, 2013

    Never heard of this.
     
  4. bella84

    bella84 Aficionado

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    We do it. We have to have data to show that a child has regressed over an extended break, whether that be summer, fall, winter, or spring. It's not necessarily for the most severe students, unless they show regression. We don't typically have many high functioning students that receive it, but it's not automatically for students with severe needs either.
     
  5. bella84

    bella84 Aficionado

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    It's basically summer school for students in sped... but it's only for students in sped. Regular students are not eligible to attend. Some sped students can attend regular summer school if they are not ESY eligible, but regular students cannot attend ESY. They work strictly on IEP goals in ESY.
     
  6. bros

    bros Phenom

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    I was in ESY when I was young. We worked on preventing regression. I remember we did a lot of reading and math that we did during the year
     
  7. JustMe

    JustMe Virtuoso

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    Maybe it's handled differently in different schools, but is it ALL summer long? Are teachers paid their regular rate? What if no one wants to teach it?

    Very interesting.
     
  8. Preschool0929

    Preschool0929 Cohort

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    We always go over it during the IEP meeting and explain to parents what it is. I've never actually had a student qualify for it, but I feel like its not legal to never tell a parent what it means or make it an option if a child can't recoup skills after a break.
     
  9. bella84

    bella84 Aficionado

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    No, I think it's usually about four weeks long. An extra month. Every district probably schedules it differently, but the students are usually still off for a few weeks at the beginning and end of the summer.

    I don't think teachers get paid the regular rate, but I don't know off the top of my head how much they get paid. I've only offered to do it as a para, not as a teacher. Unless you're in a really small district, I don't think it's usually very hard to find teachers to teach it. I assume the admin would beg, raise the rate, hire outside the district, or find some other solution if they couldn't find teachers/paras for it. I've never heard of a situation where no one was willing to do it though. There is usually someone that wants the extra money over the summer.
     
  10. bethechange

    bethechange Comrade

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    Sep 8, 2013

    There are actually more ways to qualify than just regression/recoupment, which you are supposed to show data for, as previous posters mentioned. You can also qualify if you have IEP goals or receive services that are crucial to achieving or maintaining self-sufficiency or independence (this is how all of my kids qualify). Finally, you can qualify on unique need decided by IEP team.

    In my district, if the IEP is held before the determination of the ESY schedule, we have to check either more data needed (in which case you must meet again to address this) or no. However, if you check no and your regression/recoupment data shows the need, you have to meet again. I actually always wind up doing addendum/amendment sheets with my IEP's because all of my kids (moderate/severe autism) qualify under self-sufficiency.

    In practice, in my experience, ESY can be kind of a joke, which is sad but true. As you mentioned, in a lot of cases districts are limited to whoever wants to teach it, which may or may not be people with the skills and the knowledge to do so effectively. I find it easier to just teach it myself, because it is so much work to get set up and get all the materials, schedules, plans, and data to whoever else teaches it, and then come back and find out it was not followed at all.

    In my experience, ESY pays great (our district pays hourly), is pretty stress-less if you teach your own kids or in a place/with students you are familiar with. It is usually a modified schedule (ours was 8-1, with both breakfast and lunch served). My one beef with it is that it does not pay you to set up or plan at all. This past summer, I spent one whole week, 8-5 setting up my room and getting materials and data collection ready, as I was teaching not only my own students, but also other students with autism from across the district I was not familiar with. I got paid for none of that time, nor the time I spent subsequently planning.

    There are a lot of rural districts around here that sometimes pay to bus their students into our district for ESY, as they might have only 1 or 2 that qualify, and it can be cheaper than paying a teacher/aide for that one student.
     
  11. Preschool0929

    Preschool0929 Cohort

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    Our district pay $36/hour for teaching ESY, a little more for teachers who have been teaching more than 10 years.
     
  12. TeacherNY

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    Sep 8, 2013

    My mom has worked with summer school kids for years and they only do reading and math lessons. It is only a few hours a day (9am to 1pm I think). Some kids regress over winter break, imagine how poorly they would do with a whole summer off.

    What if a family moved into your district and demanded summer school?? Would they be able to send the student to another district that offered it?
     
  13. bros

    bros Phenom

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    Your district is completely and utterly out of compliance if they do not offer it to students who do not recoup skills within 6-8 weeks of the start of the year.

    If the parents knew their stuff, they'd just file due process against the district for violating IDEA - http://idea.ed.gov/explore/view/p/,root,regs,300,B,300%2E106,
     
  14. waterfall

    waterfall Maven

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    I'm not sure yet how my new district handles it, but when I first taught sped we had to have data points that showed severe regression over breaks. We then had to turn the data and a narrative explaining our rationale into a committee at the district level and they decided who qualified. Generally, the data had to show a pattern of regression (so if they only regressed over one break, that wasn't enough). I had two students qualify in mild-moderate both years I was there.

    They didn't have any problem recruiting teachers to do it. The class sizes were extremely small (my last summer there I had 4 mild-moderate students AND a para). School was 3 hours a day, Tuesday-Thursday for 6 weeks. Part of that 3 hours was snack and recess. I got paid for an additional hour each day for planning, so I took no work home/didn't work any time unpaid. I was paid 4 hours to set up the room/get organized for the summer and 2 additional hours for cleaning up the room/putting everything back. I got 45 dollars an hour. I thought it was pretty much the best summer gig ever- not much work and tons of extra money. I literally made almost as much as a regular paycheck in a month basically working 12 hours a week.
     
  15. ecteach

    ecteach Devotee

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    Sep 8, 2013

    This I know.
     
  16. Miss~Blue

    Miss~Blue Rookie

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    Sep 10, 2013

    I worked it as a para for two years and it was a five week program. Basically 8:30 - 1:30-ish. We would do math and reading activities in the morning after morning meeting and in between we would have a break for school jobs and often therapists would do full-group or pull-outs depending on the class. After lunch it was a little more laid back they would often do school-wide activities, read book as a class,recess, etc. One year when we had higher level students we even went on quite a few community based instruction trips where we would go on public transit and we would have them look at bus schedules. It was a pretty nice program, enjoyed working it.
     
  17. Nate

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    Sep 12, 2013

    We haven't always been really adherent to state law, but now we take a measure on IEP goals in the spring, measure again in September, and then measure nine weeks after school has started (which is just the end-of-year, beginning-of-year, and marking period assessment we were doing anyway). If there's a post-summer dip that hasn't been erased by the end of the first marking period, the kid qualifies. Not sure if this is state-by-state or national, but this is definitely the "by the book" way to do it here--we've had our noses rubbed in the law pretty hard.
     
  18. kevo2005

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    Sep 12, 2013

    The problem with ESY is that the law isn't strict about regression. Because some regression is typical. I hate it being a law nazi (yes that's what they call me), but it is open for interpretation.
     

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