How does your school deal with "out of boundaries" students?

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Backroads, Sep 4, 2019.

  1. Backroads

    Backroads Aficionado

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    Sep 4, 2019

    Students who based on whatever local law you have, technically shouldn't be going to your school based on where they live.

    Does your school care? Have a system to deal with it?
     
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  3. MissCeliaB

    MissCeliaB Aficionado

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    We do home verifications if it's brought to our attention. Usually that happens if a student is failing multiple classes or has a discipline violation.
     
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  4. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    It seems to be on a case-by-case basis. Our grade 8 students (we are a k-8 school) can stay so that they don't have to transfer for one year before heading to high school. Transfer requests that had been approved may be reconsidered based on numbers or if a student is presenting with behaviour needs that we can't accommodate. As our school has grown, requests for transfers from out of area aren't granted very often. Parents are getting good at playing the game, though, using addresses of relatives in area or renting a basement apartment in area to give them the "required" address.
     
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  5. Ima Teacher

    Ima Teacher Maven

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    Typically unless we are seriously overcrowded or a student is a behavior or academic problem, I don’t think anyone cares.
     
    Last edited: Sep 4, 2019
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  6. vickilyn

    vickilyn Magnifico

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    Some schools care a great deal, especially if the student is coming from a mediocre district into a much better funded, more affluent district. Some districts won't even allow teachers to move their own children into the district where the parent teaches. We see many districts that become very vigilant if students suddenly show up from much less affluent districts, and the students have multiple needs/IEP's, since this costs the district real money. Often, however, the poorer parents have been moving frequently, making it hard to follow the address changes and the district borders, so the child stays "for the time being."
     
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  7. bella84

    bella84 Aficionado

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    My district has waivers where they will allow those students to continue attending our district based on their individual situation. If they are not offered the waiver and don't live in the district, then they cannot attend.
     
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  8. vickilyn

    vickilyn Magnifico

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    I suspect that districts that are funded by property taxes are more likely to be concerned with where students live. NJ funds the schools out of the property taxes, and since that can be a sensitive issue, I believe that may drive some of the decisions that are made.
     
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  9. waterfall

    waterfall Maven

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    My state is open enrollment, but there are some restrictions. For example, the school can say they are at capacity and won't take any more OOD (out of district) students. We did that last year in 1st when each class reached 30 kids. You can also deny OOD students for attendance or behavior issues.

    The other piece is that due to funding, students with IEPs must attend their home district. This is tough on my team because we must "kick out" several students each year. They get a letter over the summer, but of course many haven't read it/didn't notice it etc. and just show up , and then we have to turn them away. Just about 3 blocks over from my school is the dividing line between our district and the next, and many families don't even realize they've moved OOD. Parents can try to deny IEP services so they can attend the school of their choice anyway. You can fight them on it, but it's difficult because of course the district doesn't want to pay for legal action. We have a couple of kids with learning disabilities whose parents denied because they were smart enough to realize their kid was still getting just as much intervention through the title 1 program, and that was much better than going to their home district where kids with IEPs are just receiving push-in services.
     
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  10. Tired Teacher

    Tired Teacher Comrade

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    Sep 7, 2019

    Our kids can go to any school in the district provided they can get there. We have pretty huge distances too between schools. There are a few charter schools you have to "win" a lottery to get in though. By "win" I mean know someone who gets your child's name on the list. Kids who misbehave or need sped services do not get on the "win" list.
    If a kid is in SPED, they can get transportation really far if they threaten to sue!
     
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