How does your school collect teacher input for IEPs?

Discussion in 'Special Education' started by Mrwinn, Dec 23, 2021.

  1. Mrwinn

    Mrwinn New Member

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    Dec 23, 2021

    I’ve been tasked with improving my school’s teacher input process for IEPs. Currently, our IEP case managers send out an email with a Google Form attached where teachers can fill out information about the student. The problem we are running into is many teachers aren’t completing the Google Forms, or they aren’t including quality information about the students. As I brainstorm solutions, I am curious how your school collects teacher input for IEPs.
     
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  3. whizkid

    whizkid Connoisseur

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    Dec 23, 2021

    We don't. The big wheels make all of the decisions.
     
  4. Tired Teacher

    Tired Teacher Connoisseur

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    Dec 24, 2021

    I used to get so many questionnaires for kids in sped that it was unreal. Some had hundreds of questions. When a teacher has 10 kids in sped, there is no way they can fill those out thoughtfully. I did them but did not ponder the questions deeply. If I wanted meaningful information, I'd ask a smaller number of questions. If I really wanted meaningful info, I'd offer to do their recess duty while they filled it out! :) I'd write you a meaningful essay on the child during recess! :)
     
  5. waterfall

    waterfall Virtuoso

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    Dec 24, 2021

    I've tried many ways, and found this is something I just needed to let go for my own sanity. I've tried the input forms, and I would have to hound teachers over and over to get them back, and if I ever did get them back, they included very generic, obvious information about the child that wasn't really helpful. I now send an email asking for two very specific data points that I need to include in present levels- a screenshot of the student's math performance (we have a computer program that tracks all of this, and all they need to do is send me a screenshot of the child's homepage) and the student's district writing prompt score. We use DIBELS to track progress in reading and I have access to the whole school for that, so no need to ask. I ask in the same email if there is other input they'd like to include. If we're somewhat near-ish a report card being sent out, I glance at that to see if there is anything specific I can include from that. I start this about a month before the student's IEP is due. That way I have time to send umpteen reminders if necessary. Most do respond, with that much notice, but for stragglers I will start bothering them in person about it.

    That way I can document that I've asked the teacher/they can't say they weren't included, but I don't waste my time hounding them for information. In the meeting, I review the present levels and needs and ask the teacher if they have something to add/have seen anything different in the classroom, again giving them the opportunity to contribute, in front of the parent. The vast majority just say, "No, that sounds like little Johnny," or "You covered everything."

    If the school/district is absolutely insisting that more input be given, the only way I see that consistently happening is to set up a "pre-meeting" before the IEP meeting, in person, with the sped team and the teacher, so they are forced to answer the questions. And if generic answers are given, you can ask follow up questions to get the answers you need. We do this for initial and tri IEPs, especially when it's needed because we're looking at social/emotional and rating scales HAVE to be filled out in order to be able to determine eligibility. If this is not coming from the district/school admin and it's just your team wanting to be "be better about getting input," I'd honestly let it go. Give the teachers chances to provide it if they want, but don't force it.
     
    EdEd likes this.
  6. teacherintexas

    teacherintexas Maven

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    Dec 24, 2021

    We have paper input forms.
     

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