How does your pay scale work?

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by DrivingPigeon, Sep 20, 2014.

  1. DrivingPigeon

    DrivingPigeon Phenom

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    Sep 20, 2014

    We were introduced to our new pay model on Thursday. It's kind of interesting, and I was wondering if anyone else had anything like it.

    Teachers are ranked by both their administrator, and by themselves. They have to fall into one of four domains of influence: classroom, team, school, or district.

    Within each domain, there are 5 categories: certification, results of your teacher effectiveness rating (a state-wide initiative, based on yearly goal-setting and reflection), collaboration & leadership, creativity, and continuous improvement. We have to look at a rubric, and rate ourselves, and our principal does the same. Then you meet to see how your ratings matched, and decide which domain you fall into. Within each domain of influence there is a salary range, and your principal can decide where you fall within that range. If you don't have your master's degree you can only be in the classroom or team domain.

    There is also a separate stipend attached to number of grad credits, having your master's degree, and years of service. Teachers will get these raises regardless. The domain rating just determines an additional incentive/stipend amount. Teachers are re-evaluated every 3 years.

    I kind of like it. I think it's good that teachers who do more and work hard will be compensated, because I work my hinder off. It is in no way tied to student test results, either. The only thing that most of us are worried about is that our principal is NEVER in our classrooms. Last year she was only in my room one time for my formal observation. My school is really big and we don't have an AP. She also has tons of meetings to attend. So I have no clue how she knows what goes on in my classroom. It's not her fault-we just need an AP.

    If your district has a pay scale, what does it look like?
     
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  3. swansong1

    swansong1 Virtuoso

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    Sep 20, 2014

    The pay scale for the district I used to work in was new this year. 50% of the grade is based on test scores. 50% is based on your annual evaluation. No extra money for years of service or higher degree. Everyone starts at a base salary this year and the only way to get a raise each year is to end up in one of two categories (Excellent or meets expectations...don't know the real names). If you don't fall in either of those categories, you don't get a raise.
     
  4. waterfall

    waterfall Maven

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    My district is currently the only one in the area that still uses a traditional "step" pay scale. Our superintendent seems adamant that it will stay that way, but I imagine that at some point new laws will make it impossible. Our current pay scale heavily favors those with masters degrees- you pretty much have to get one to make a decent salary. Without any grad credits, you can't move past step 5, regardless of experience. You can't move past step 11 without a complete master's degree, and you can't move past 20 without any credits beyond a master's degree. In addition to that, teacher with a master's make significantly more at each step than those who don't. For example, I'm on step 4 and I make about 3,000 extra over a person with just a BA just for having 30 grad credits. When I finish my master's this December, I will make 7,000 more than a person on step 4 with just a BA. Theoretically, you're supposed to move up a step each year for experience, but there have been tons of freezes due to budget cuts. They have given the raises for grad credits every year even if there weren't step raises.

    Most other districts in the area have gone completely the opposite way- they pay little if anything for having a masters and all raises are based on performance, which is usually linked to test scores. That's why I was so hesitant to start my masters- although it totally makes sense in my district, if I go anywhere else it's pretty much useless, and obviously it took a lot of time and money to get it. There is also the fear that we will eventually go to a pay for performance type system instead. In my first district, you got a raise amount based on your performance, which was 50% building wide test scores and 50% based off of your individual evaluation. The whole thing was pretty much moot during the time I was there though, because with budget cuts they weren't giving raises anyway.
     
  5. giraffe326

    giraffe326 Virtuoso

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    Sep 20, 2014

    We have a traditional step schedule. It only has 11 steps on it (0-10). It pays for BA, BA +15, MA, MA +15, and MA +30. So once you get to your 11th year, you can only get pay raises by COL adjustments or getting more education. I started on step 5, so I will top out more quickly. If I stay.
     
  6. DrivingPigeon

    DrivingPigeon Phenom

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    Some of your step schedules sound like what we used to have. We were also stuck at step 5 unless we took grad credits.

    The step schedule went out the door when the unions lost the right to negotiate 4 years ago. So far I think I'm ok with the new approach, though!
     
  7. vickilyn

    vickilyn Magnifico

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    At the HS where I worked, we had a similar schedule, except that there were steps beyond MA +30. They had a step for dual masters, and another for doctorate, and they had teachers at all of them.

    Where I am now, everyone gets the same raise, this year 2%, unless you earn a master's, or add certifications such as TOSD, LDTC, or Reading Support. No increase for length of service. We do get tuition reimbursement, which helps to add more education that would lead to a pay increase.
     
  8. agdamity

    agdamity Fanatic

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    Sep 20, 2014

    We have a traditional step schedule.
     
  9. yellowdaisies

    yellowdaisies Fanatic

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    Sep 21, 2014

    We have a traditional step and column schedule. I'm in BA+60, but there is also BA +75 and BA +90 (our credential program in CA is 30 units post bacc so that explains higher units). I need to move over to the right eventually.
     
  10. FourSquare

    FourSquare Fanatic

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    We have lanes and steps based on education and years of service.

    I love the idea of bonus money for doing committees and things. It kills me that there are teachers who make more money than me by doing the absolute minimum between 8 and 3. Meanwhile, I am doing 3 committees, Saturday school, free tutoring, staff PD, and a gazillion other things....no $!

    And I am not the only one. If the 4 or 5 people who did EVERYTHING in my school just stopped...things would fall apart!
     
  11. ahodge79

    ahodge79 Companion

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    Hi Yellow Daisies, that's great but they make no accommodation for people who come from out of state whose license/credential was included in their bachelors. I had to get a masters to get plus 30!
     
  12. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Sep 22, 2014

    We have the traditional step schedule in my district.

    The pay scale described in the original post sounds terribly complicated to me.
     
  13. DrivingPigeon

    DrivingPigeon Phenom

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    It's really not too bad...It's basically a traditional step schedule, with an added stipend incentive for the extra work you do.
     
  14. smalltowngal

    smalltowngal Multitudinous

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    Sep 22, 2014

    We're on a traditional pay scale. You do get extra for a master's degree (though the district just recently reinstated this). Every district I've worked in has had a traditional pay scale.
     
  15. DrivingPigeon

    DrivingPigeon Phenom

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    Sep 22, 2014

    I should probably mention that I live in WI, where unions lost collective bargaining power in 2010. I think we always had the traditional step schedule, because the unions didn't want pay based on performance. I have to say that I'm really looking forward to it, though, because I feel like I do a lot more than a lot of other teachers. I think it's great that my hard work will be recognized! And I'm not talking about all of the extra hours I put in or anything, but just the amount of professional development, reflection, etc. that I do compared to others.
     
  16. iteachbx

    iteachbx Enthusiast

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    Sep 25, 2014

    That sounds complicated, but I like the idea of it too. There are people who go above and beyond in my school and people who do the bare minimum. Yet we all get the same salary. Doesn't seem fair.


    At my school you're salary increase yearly (slightly except for some of the "big" years.) You can get big increases for having a masters, masters +30, etc.
     

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