How do you utilize peer grading/review/assessment, etc.

Discussion in 'Secondary Education' started by Peregrin5, Aug 6, 2014.

  1. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Maven

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    Aug 6, 2014

    I love the use of peer assessment. I especially use it for things that would take me forever to grade.

    This year I'm going to be attempting to use it for lab reports. Last year, grading lab reports was extremely difficult, because I would need to collect all of their notebooks. I couldn't take them home because there were too many, and they were generally difficult to read through especially if they were disorganized or in poor handwriting.

    Teachers who have used lab notebooks for years have told me that it takes them 3 weeks to get through grading theirs and then by that time they have more lab reports to grade. Gragh!

    So I decided: scientists use peer review. We're going to use peer review.

    I'm going to let students do the majority of the grading and feedback work. (specifically, I will have the students provide peer feedback based on a rubric, allow students to make changes as necessary and then allow them to self-grade their labs based on a rubric) Then I will briefly scan the work, the peer feedback, self-grades, and provide a single letter grade for multiple labs at once which will be the only one to go into the grade. I'm hoping this will cut down on my grading greatly.

    I know many people are leery about peer grades because there seems to be legislation affecting many states about who can see the scores of students. I don't think this law is in effect in California and I'd be working around it anyway by just allowing students to provide peer feedback and self-grades which are different from the official grade anyway.

    I use self-grading frequently for homework assignments, and peer correction for quizzes though.

    How do you feel about peer grading? If you use it, how do you use it in your class?
     
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  3. dgpiaffeteach

    dgpiaffeteach Aficionado

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    I use peer editing. It's another two pairs of eyes to look over their essays before they turn them in. I give them a sheet to use with guiding questions.

    I think it's okay. There's enough value to keep trying, but it's far from perfect or even great. I get a lot of "there's nothing wrong with this paper" and then I have to sit down and show them (again for the 15th time) how to find things to work on. They are also sometimes wrong. Like they change things that were already correct. It's a work in progress and I'm going to change a few things this year.

    I assess them on their peer editing sheet they turn in to see if they really tried to help their peers.
     
  4. 2ndTimeAround

    2ndTimeAround Phenom

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    I've used peer editing a few times. I had a rubric set up once where a student's lab report grade was in part determined by his peer review on a classmate's report. It pushed kids to do more than glance at a friend's paper and say "it's fine." I paired like students with like. So the top kids were with other top kids. But especially the lazy kids were with the lazy ones. Amazingly, the lazy kids really stepped up and once they found a mistake in their partner's paper they were far less likely to make the same one in their own.
     
  5. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Maven

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    I'm using rubrics and checklists as well. I'm hoping this gets them past the "There's nothing wrong" stage. It's very concrete things I'm having them check for.
     
  6. a2z

    a2z Maven

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    I don't believe in peer editing. It is useless for some and advantage for others. The child that has few editing skills isn't going to help anyone even with a rubric. The person with excellent skills will give a grade boost to the kid that doesn't have skills.

    Writing grades should be based on what students are capable of doing independently, not what another student can do for them.
     
  7. dgpiaffeteach

    dgpiaffeteach Aficionado

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    I think there are many benefits to peer editing though. I'm applying to a masters program this year. I will absolutely be asking the other English teachers (two of them) to look it over and give me feedback. Students need to realize that every good writer has someone to help them edit. We are offering tutoring this year. I will strongly encourage my weak writers to have someone help them with editing. In my experience, their grades don't show significant improvement from peer editing. Grammar is a small part of their overall grade.
     
  8. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Maven

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    Well for what I'm thinking of, even if they just complete the rubric, that is going to provide some feedback to the student. But I'm not grading on things like spelling or grammar so it might be different than what you think of when you say peer-editing.

    Mind if I show you my rubric and you can give me comments on it?
     
  9. chemteach55

    chemteach55 Connoisseur

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    What about peer editing in pairs? I do this sometimes with lab reports and have done it successfully done it with 8th graders in the past. Each pair gets 2 lab reports from another pair and together they peer edit using a rubric. Then the group of 4 get together and discuss all 4 of the reports--the good and the bad. Even my weaker students get much better at writing lab reports through this method. I would send you my rubric but I write a new one for each lab report because each report is different. They get the rubric with the lab instructions so they know what is expected.
     
  10. AdamnJakesMommy

    AdamnJakesMommy Habitué

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    That is really a great idea.
     
  11. Brendan

    Brendan Fanatic

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    I'd be careful about allowing students to grade subjective assignments like lab reports that are worth a large portion of student grades.
     
  12. 2ndTimeAround

    2ndTimeAround Phenom

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    Students aren't grading. They're peer editing. Big difference.

    And... you don't know how much lab reports are worth in our classes. Collectively mine are worth 20% of the course grade.
     
  13. a2z

    a2z Maven

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    How can you assure that a student independently knows the material you are grading them on when a peer or a group tells them what is wrong and most likely what the right answer is?

    I'm not saying there is no benefit at all for people working together, but peer editing and group work gives a false impression about what a student knows, understands, and can produce independently.
     
  14. a2z

    a2z Maven

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    You can show it to me, but I don't think it will change my mind.
     
  15. 2ndTimeAround

    2ndTimeAround Phenom

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    I don't really care if a student knows it when his paper goes to peer editing. As long as he knows it when he turns in the final draft to me. If it takes another person to drill in what a lab or a report is supposed to look like, then fine by me.

    In my room peer editing looks something like this: students come in, expecting to turn in their paper for me to grade. They switch papers, usually not getting the paper of the same person that has theirs. Students will read through the paper. Then, during a second reading I will have them get out a pen/pencil and make notations. I will give them direction for what I'm looking for that day. Peers might suggest that the writer moves the conclusion toward the end of the report. Peers might suggest a write clean up his spelling and grammar. Peers might comment that a student used an incorrect formula or that the math doesn't add up. The peer writes his/her name at the bottom of the report and the papers get turned into me.

    While the students are working on something independently that same day I will read through the peer comments and award a few points for the feedback, place that into the gradebook and then return the papers to the owners. Students are then given a choice - they can go ahead and submit their papers right then and I'll grade them or they can go home, revise their work and submit it the next day with corrections.

    Sometimes I will have students that do the revisions submit the original, marked up paper along with the revision.

    Like I said before, I'm not too concerned if a peer tells a student what to write. After all, I had just done the same thing myself the day before when we completed the lab in class. If it takes a second person to get the message through, I'm fine with that.
     
  16. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    I kind of like this.
     
  17. a2z

    a2z Maven

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    And what is your proof that the student understands what was put on the paper if someone else told the student what to put whether that be you or another student? At least with you, you know the conversation that was had with the student, the student's replies to you, and you can assess how well the connections are being made unless your comments are just written comments on a paper that are just being re-worked or answers found and added to a paper. The answer can't be the final lab report or paper because it wasn't independent and the paper doesn't indicate if it is knowledge that is known or knowledge that was just repeated.

    I'm not against kids working together, but the problem arises when grading. Grades should show independent ability.
     
  18. 2ndTimeAround

    2ndTimeAround Phenom

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    I must be missing something here. The way I'm understanding your statements is that all students should come into a class automatically knowing how to do everything. That a teacher's role is to simply grade a student's ability. That the students should know how, from the start, to correctly write a paper.

    NOTHING my students do is completely independent. Either I have directly instructed them on how to do something or I have provided a means for them to figure it out with a little assistance. Peer editing is simply one of those ways that I assist them.
     
  19. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Maven

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    Agreed.

    While it would be nice for students to learn the concepts independently through inquiry, there is always a handful of students who didn't get the lesson they were supposed to get through experimentation and they need to be taught it through direct instruction sometimes. Sometimes they will only realize that they achieved the knowledge through experimentation after they've directly been taught what they were supposed to understand.

    In my class, the peer review process is mostly for completion of the lab work, and formatting. (i.e. do they have their hypothesis?, is their claim, evidence, and reasoning present and sound?)

    We do a summarizing discussion after a lab in which students share their claim, evidence, and reasoning as a class, and we put it all up on the board to analyze the strengths of each argument. Then as a class we choose the best argument with the best evidence (with guidance from me).

    This is written as a reflection about the lab in the write-up. The peer review takes place afterwards just to check that everything has been completed.

    If I'm attempting to judge understanding for grading, I will use something like a quiz or an exam, but I think even those have more value if students can learn from them and correct them.
     
  20. mrs.whatsit

    mrs.whatsit Rookie

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    Aug 7, 2014

    at the end of every class period I give an exit ticket, in the last five minute my students switch their ticket with their elbow partner. We grade each others papers and then pass them in. Students get immediate feedback and I can quickly add their scores in the grade book to track mastery.
     

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